Now Viewing: Social determinants of health

Entrepreneurs and Underserved Communities: StartUp Health's New Accelerator

Feb 18, 2014, 8:00 AM, Posted by Paul Tarini

Members of the public stand at tables at a polling center, signing in to vote and have flu vaccinations

The past few years have been marked with a surge in health care business accelerators—programs that provide support to help health care entrepreneurs develop their ideas and raise initial funding. In tracking the success of these innovation hubs, we realized something was missing.

On the complex journey of taking a health care idea to market, most entrepreneurs aren’t seeing underserved communities—the people and the providers who serve them—as target markets. The result is that health care innovations are passing by some of the communities that could benefit the most from innovation. But what if we could help entrepreneurs see these patients and their providers as a viable market? What if we could make it easier for health care businesses to design solutions for the needs of our most vulnerable populations?

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Pioneering Idea: Your Patient’s Community Health Needs Assessment on the Desktop

Dec 21, 2012, 10:06 AM, Posted by Ted Eytan

Ted Eytan, MD Ted Eytan

In medical school, we were taught an ahead-of-its-time curriculum called "Community Oriented Primary Care." It looks like now we're going to get to be able to practice it.

When I was with the Project HealthDesign (@PrjHealthDesign) team in Nashville earlier this year (see: A visit to Project HealthDesign and the patient voice, spoken through their observations of daily living | Ted Eytan, MD), we participated in an interesting exercise while wearing silly hats. It involved turning our thinking 180 degrees around about the future of health.

 

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Positioned for Transformation: Expanding the Scope of Health Care

May 18, 2012, 10:58 AM, Posted by Deborah Bae, Jane Isaacs Lowe

In the Stanford Social Innovation Review’s “Realigning Health with Care,” authors Rebecca Onie, Paul Farmer and Heidi Behforouz express their collective belief that—in the United States—we need to expand our understanding of the scope of health care, where it’s delivered and who delivers it. They also make it clear that the time to do so is now if we are going to confront our country’s rising health care costs, primary care physician shortage and expansion of the ranks of those living in poverty or hovering just above it. 

Onie, Farmer and Behforouz also propose that we need to look beyond our shores and borders for models for how to do so, pointing out that “in the developing world, there is no choice but to design health care systems that account for limited financial resources, scarce health care professionals and significant poverty.” 

We couldn’t agree more.

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