Now Viewing: Data

A Conversation with the Health Data Exploration Project

Mar 31, 2014, 1:12 PM, Posted by Pioneer Blog Team

Person tracking their health data on a mobile device.

RWJF’s Lori Melichar and Steve Downs sat down with grantees Kevin Patrick and Jerry Sheehan who lead the Health Data Exploration project to discuss early insights from their work, shared in the recent report Personal Data for the Public Good: New Opportunities to Enrich Understanding of Individual and Population Health.”

Patrick and Sheehan are working on a team that is exploring the use of personal health data in research and how to bridge the “worlds” of individuals who track data about their own personal health, companies that develop tracking apps and devices and typically hold these data, and health researchers.

Here are highlights from their conversation:

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Big News in Big Data: NIH Launches Largest and Most Diverse Genetics Database Ever Created

Feb 26, 2014, 7:21 PM, Posted by Nancy Barrand

biobank

Eighteen years ago this month, Big Data had a cultural coming out party when IBM's Deep Blue defeated international chess champion Gary Kasparov in a game. Gary Kasparov was a chess genius. But Deep Blue could mine the records of 700,000 grandmaster chess games and evaluate 200 million positions per second. The famously nimble Kasparov ultimately could not match the brute computing force of Deep Blue. 

This week we mark another historic milestone in Big Data history. This time, there is more at stake than bragging rights from a chess competition. 

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Utility Data May Create Innovative Safety Net for Seniors

Jan 30, 2014, 4:30 PM, Posted by Pioneer Blog Team

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In the wake of Google’s acquisition of Nest, the much buzzed about maker of sensor driven thermostats, we’ve made our own investment in a Silicon Valley organization that seeks to make smart use of household utility data. The Palo Alto Medical Foundation Innovation Center is developing a home-based solution for proactively detecting changes in a senior’s social and physical health status. LinkAges Connect will use in-home data signals, such as utility use patterns, to monitor older adults’ health and support independent living at home.  Significant changes in use patterns will automatically trigger an alert to caregivers, thus providing a community safety net for seniors and peace of mind for their loved ones. As we look for sustainable solutions in elderly care, this nonintrusive home-based system could improve health outcomes for seniors by reducing accidents and hospitalizations.

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Persuading People to be Healthy: Thoughts from a Healthspottr Innovation Salon on Microtargeting

Jan 24, 2014, 8:00 AM, Posted by Lori Melichar

Lori Melichar, director Lori Melichar, director

If we're going to create a culture of health in this country, then we need to re-examine our influence strategies. In other words: We need to get better at delivering the exact right message or intervention that is most likely to get someone to take action that improves their health, their family or friends' health or the healthiness of their community. And that means we need to get better at microtargeting — applying the vast amounts of data available about people's habits and preferences to identify who is most persuadable.

I recently co-hosted an RWJF-funded Healthspottr Innovation Salon focused on the subject of microtargeting, where I met Ricky Gonzales of Enroll America and Erek Dyskant of BlueLabs, both of whom were on the Obama campaign's data analytics team. They talked about how they used microtargeting during the campaign and how those innovations may apply to health, something you can read more about in articles from The New York Times, Mother Jones, and the Wall Street Journal, among other sources. When I observed that several approaches they described might have applications for health and health care, Dyskant said, "Influencing people to make healthy decisions is much harder than getting someone to vote in a single election."

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Engaging Patients in Research

Dec 3, 2013, 8:00 AM, Posted by Paul Tarini

What happens when you engage patients in research? That’s a question RWJF is exploring with grants to Sage Bionetworks and PatientsLikeMe to build online, open-source platforms that give patients the opportunity to contribute to and collaborate on research.

Sage Bionetworks’ BRIDGE platform will allow patients to share and track their health data and collaborate on research into diseases and health problems that matter most to them. Three research projects will be piloted on BRIDGE in the coming year, focusing on diabetes, Fanconi anemia and sleeping disorders.

PatientsLikeMe’s Open Research Exchange (ORE) will give researchers and patients a space to work together to develop health outcome measures that better reflect outcomes that are meaningful to patients. After several months building the ORE, PatientsLikeMe is now in testing mode, putting the platform through its paces. But it’s not just an academic exercise. PatientsLikeMe has recruited four researchers to pilot the ORE. These researchers will be providing feedback on the site while working with patients in the PatientsLikeMe network to develop and test an initial set of health outcome measures.

Sage Bionetwork’s Stephen Friend discusses collaboration between patients and researchers

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