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Explore Opportunities and Trends at Health Datapalooza

Apr 28, 2014, 8:00 AM, Posted by Paul Tarini

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We’re a little over a month away from the 2014 Health Datapalooza (HDP) conference. For those of you who don’t know, HDP—an event of the Health Data Consortium, which RWJF supports—is a great venue to explore the opportunities and trends of open health data.

Trying to get a firm understanding of this space can be challenging, but HDP brings it all together. The conference has tracks focusing on the use of open data by businesses and consumers, in community and clinical settings, and for research purposes.

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A Conversation with the Health Data Exploration Project

Mar 31, 2014, 1:12 PM, Posted by Pioneer Blog Team

Person tracking their health data on a mobile device.

RWJF’s Lori Melichar and Steve Downs sat down with grantees Kevin Patrick and Jerry Sheehan who lead the Health Data Exploration project to discuss early insights from their work, shared in the recent report Personal Data for the Public Good: New Opportunities to Enrich Understanding of Individual and Population Health.”

Patrick and Sheehan are working on a team that is exploring the use of personal health data in research and how to bridge the “worlds” of individuals who track data about their own personal health, companies that develop tracking apps and devices and typically hold these data, and health researchers.

Here are highlights from their conversation:

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Creating a Knowledge Map with Stanford Medical School

Mar 24, 2014, 1:00 PM, Posted by Mike Painter

Mike Painter, senior program officer Mike Painter, senior program officer

Why should I be in the same room with these people?

That’s one of the many smart questions participants posed at a Stanford Medical School meeting I attended last weekend.  If I had been daydreaming (I’d never do that), I might have thought the question was for me. You see, the participants were a handpicked set of national medical education experts, folks nominally from the status quo medical-education-industrial complex—the very thing we’re trying to change.

You might think that they embodied that dreaded status quo.  I’m happy to report they did not—not even close.  I’m also relieved to tell you that the question (in spite of my paranoia) wasn’t for me. Instead, it was one of many challenges these thoughtful, passionate teachers tossed at each other.

“Why are we in the room?” was a challenge to each other. Why and when should teachers be in the same room with the learners?

When you think about it, that’s actually a central question if you’re attempting to use online education to flip the medical education experience.  It’s also a brave one if you’re a teacher: justify the time you spend with your students.

Read the rest of this post on The Health Care Blog

What's Next Health: Designing an Elegant Health Care Process

Mar 20, 2014, 8:00 AM, Posted by Pioneer Blog Team

Jay Parkinson, founder of Sherpaa Jay Parkinson, founder of Sherpaa

Each month, What’s Next Health talks with leading thinkers with big ideas about the future of health and health care. Recently, we talked with Jay Parkinson, founder of Sherpaa, who challenged us to consider what a more "beautifully designed" health care system might look like. As you'll read in his post below, Jay’s trying to do just that through his work at Sherpaa. (Jay’s opinions are not necessarily those of the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation.)

By Jay Parkinson

Everything great comes from an elegantly designed process. Just think of all of the experiences we love and use on a daily basis. Consider the iPhone. Apple re-imagined what a phone, or rather, a tiny computer in your pocket, could be and created a revolutionary device. Steve Jobs designed not only the interface that changed computing forever, but Tim Cook designed the manufacturing and material sourcing processes that enabled them to produce a remarkably complicated device at a relatively inexpensive price. They understood that, in order to deliver an exceptional user experience, they had to design the entire process, from the interface to the factory.

Health care was never designed. It just happened, revolving mostly around doctors’ needs and wants, in a culture that strongly believed “doctor knows best.” But our culture changed with the democratization of health information and other industries quickly evolved, raising consumers’ expectations of what health care could and should be.

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Pioneering Ideas Podcast: Episode 3

Mar 11, 2014, 8:00 AM, Posted by Pioneer Blog Team

Welcome to the third episode of our podcast, where we explore cutting edge ideas and emerging trends that can transform health and health care. Your host is Lori Melichar, a director at the foundation.

Ideas in this Episode

  • The science of choosing – From TV shows to health plans, Americans have more options than ever before – and we like it. But do we really? What does our relationship with choice mean for our health, and for the health care system as a whole?
  • The radical power of empathy – What happens when a health care provider actually stops and listens to a patient? How does empathy fuel innovation?
  • The next generation of health care innovators – We hear from two students at Princeton University who are studying how to apply social entrepreneurship to address global health challenges.

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