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Project HealthDesign Provides Input on Health IT Policies

Jan 10, 2012, 8:37 AM, Posted by Patricia Flatley Brennan

Since health reform passed almost two years ago, we’ve seen the health care system begin to change quite a bit. The push for better uses of health IT has brought about many proposed rules and programs, and federal agencies have requested public input on many of these proposals.

Because Project HealthDesign has always included multi-disciplinary teams of researchers, clinicians, and patients who are helping to lay the foundation for a patient-centered health IT system, we’ve seized these opportunities to share our unique insights by commenting on several proposed policies. In the process, we’ve been able to share our thoughts about promising practices for collecting patient-generated data and incorporating it into the clinical care process.

In 2011, Project HealthDesign provided feedback on seven proposed policies. These ranged from applauding the HHS Proposed Rule on Patient Access to Lab Reports, which would allow patients to become more engaged with their health data, to calling for better distinctions between mobile apps and mobile medical apps under the FDA Mobile Medical Application Guidance. Working together to help refine these types of policy proposals is even more critical now as we enter a new era of widespread adoption and use of health IT.

Read Project HealthDesign’s policy comments, watch “How Clinicians Can Help Guide Federal Conversations About Health IT,” or visit the Project HealthDesign website to learn more.

You can also check out Dr. Roger Luckmann's post on KevinMD.com about how Project HealthDesign is helping people with chronic diseases manage pain.

What Do We Really Need from mHealth?

Nov 29, 2011, 1:04 AM, Posted by Al Shar

The December 5-7 mHealth Summit is approaching and I’m pleased and excited to be moderating the special session: What I Really Need from mHealth: Five Perspectives on Value.

Pioneer has been involved with multiple aspects of mHealth since very early on and has seen interest grow into what sometimes seems to me to be an “irrational exuberance,” to borrow a phrase from Alan Greenspan. I’m concerned that we’re on the way to another bubble that’s in danger of bursting with unfortunate consequences. The fact is we often don’t know what “works,” and even what “working” means. And that’s why it’s so important that we discuss the different ways value needs to be demonstrated in mHealth.

This mHealth Summit panel will talk about value from the perspectives of the individual, the provider, the payer, the regulator and the researcher. These can be different, but from time to time they converge. Rather than having a number of separate presentations, experts will engage in discussion around a hypothetic but realistic scenario of a mobile health device and what’s needed to provide enough “value” for each to adopt, approve, purchase, share, fund and embrace this as a tool for better health. It is sure to be a lively and informative discussion.

I hope that you’ll be able to join us either in person in Washington, D.C. or electronically to help us shape the dialogue.

Follow the conference discussion through #mHS11, leave a comment below, or follow me on Twitter to join in the conversation.

Converging Ideas at the 2011 mHealth Summit

Nov 22, 2011, 9:55 AM, Posted by Al Shar

Sometimes things just come together. We funded the first mHealth Summit because it was interesting and pioneering, and it seemed to have a connection to a few of our Project HealthDesign grants. Then came our involvement with and support of Quantified Self, Open mHealth, the Stanford Mobile Health 2011 conference and the mHealth Evidence meeting. Other programs, like our national program Health Games Research, Games for Health Conference and the Reality Mining meeting that we funded at MIT in 2009, also have strong mHealth associations.

This is more than just coincidence--rather, mHealth focuses on many of the qualities that make Pioneer “pioneering.” mHealth has the potential to radically change the way health and health care is delivered, it is inherently oriented to the individual, and it is an area not yet burdened with the organizational and bureaucratic complexities of traditional health care. mHealth is a place where something radical can happen.

It is therefore particularly gratifying to see that Pioneer will be well-represented at the 2011 mHealth Summit on December 5-7 in Washington, D.C., with grantees featured in sessions on Open mHealth, The Evolution of Gaming and its Effect on Prevention and Wellness, and Wireless Patient Monitoring in Care Facilities: The Future of Wearable mHealth Applications, Devices, and Sensors, and with a  Pioneer-sponsored session, What I Really Need from mHealth: Five Perspectives on Value. This session builds on a discussion that began in August at a Pioneer co-sponsored workshop on mHealth Evidence.

I hope that you’ll be able to join us at the conference, tweet me at @alshar using #mHS11,  and help frame what I’m sure will be a very important discussion.