Aug 18 2014
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Public Health News Roundup: August 18

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EBOLA UPDATE: Looted Quarantine Center Raises Fears of Ebola’s Spread
(NewPublicHealth is monitoring the public health crisis in West Africa.)
The raid by residents of an Ebola quarantine center in Liberia this weekend sent potentially infected patients fleeing and has raised very serious concerns over spreading the outbreak throughout West Point, Monrovia. Looters—apparently angry that patients were brought to the holding center from other parts of Monrovia—were seen taking items that were visibly stained with blood, vomit and excrement, all of which can spread the Ebola virus. The Washington Post reports that there have been talks about quarantining the entire township if needed. Read more on Ebola.

Study: Mothers in Poorer Health Less Likely to Breastfeed
Mothers who are in poorer health are also less likely to breastfeed their infant children, according to a new study in the journal PLOS ONE. Researchers from the School of Public Health at the University of Minnesota determined that women who are obese, have diabetes or have hypertension were 30 percent less likely to intend to breastfeed than were mothers without health complications. “Statistically we’re seeing an increase in breastfeeding in the U.S., which is great news. Unfortunately, at the same time, rates of obesity and other health problems are increasing. More than a million women each year enter pregnancy with a health problem, and our study shows that these mothers were less likely to plan to breastfeed,” said Katy Kozhimannil, PhD, lead author of the study and assistant professor at the university, in a release. “This is troubling because the families with social and medical risk factors are often those who stand to gain the most benefits from breastfeeding.” Read more on maternal and infant health.

Study: HPV Vaccine Still Effective After Eight Years
The human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine appears to remain effective at protecting against the sexually transmitted virus for at least eight years, according to a new study in the journal Pediatrics. Researchers randomly assigned 1,781 sexually inactive boys and girls ages 9-15 to either the HPV vaccine or placebo shots, finding that those who received the vaccine still had antibodies against HPV after eight years. “The body's response against HPV by making antibodies looks very good at eight years, and it seems like no booster doses will be necessary," said lead researcher Daron Ferris, MD, director of the HPV epidemiology and prevention program at Georgia Regents University in Atlanta, according to HealthDay. "These are all indications that the vaccine is safe, and it looks like it's effective in preventing genital warts and other diseases caused by HPV.” Read more on vaccines.

Tags: Ebola, Maternal and Infant Health, News roundups, Public health, Vaccines