Jul 8 2014
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Public Health News Roundup: July 8

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HHS: $83.4M to Improve Community Access to Primary Health Care
The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) is awarding $83.4 million to 60 Teaching Health Centers as part of the Affordable Care Act. The funds will go toward training more than 550 residents during the 2014-15 academic year, with the goal of strengthening primary care and improving access to health care in U.S. communities. Areas covered will include family medicine, internal medicine, pediatrics, obstetrics, gynecology, psychiatry, geriatrics and general dentistry. “This program not only provides training to primary care medical and dental residents, but also galvanizes communities,” said Health Resources and Services Administration Administrator Mary K. Wakefield, PhD, RN. “It brings hospitals, academic centers, health centers, and community organizations together to provide top-notch medical education and services in areas of the country that need them most.” Read more on access to care.

Community Preventive Services Task Force Recommends Universal Motorcycle Helmet Laws
Universal motorcycle helmet laws can prevent injuries and save lives while also saving communities the high health care costs associated with collisions, according to a new review of 69 studies and a separate economic review of 22 studies by the Community Preventive Services Task Force. Based on the conclusions, the task force—an independent, nonfederal, unpaid panel of public health and prevention experts—recommends all U.S. communities adopt universal helmet laws, with are more effective than no law or partial helmet laws at preventing severe injuries. The study found that the United States and other high-income communities saw substantial decreases in motorcycle-related deaths and injuries after enacting universal helmet laws, but the inverse when universal laws were repealed or replaced with other laws. Read more on injury prevention.

Study: Fungus Behind 2013 Yogurt Recall a Larger Threat than Previously Believed
The fungus behind an outbreak that led to the September 2013 recall of Chobani brand Greek yogurt is more dangerous than first believed, according to a new study in mBio, the online journal of the American Society for Microbiology. Initially the company believed that the Murcor circinelloides fungus was only a potential danger to people with compromised immune systems. However, as additional gastrointestinal were reported researchers continued their study, concluding that the “harmless” fungus was actually a strain with the ability to cause disease. “When people think about food-borne pathogens, normally they list bacteria, viruses, and maybe parasites. Fungal pathogens are not considered as food-borne pathogens. However, this incidence indicates that we need to pay more attention to fungi. Fungal pathogens can threaten our health systems as food-borne pathogens” said Soo Chan Lee of Duke University, an author on the study. Read more on food safety.

Tags: Access to Health Care, Food Safety, Injury Prevention, News roundups, Public health