Jul 7 2014
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Public Health News Roundup: July 7

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CDC: One in 25 U.S. Drivers Report Falling Asleep at the Wheel in the Previous 30 Days
Approximately one in 25 U.S. drivers reported falling asleep while driving at least once in the previous 30 days, according to the latest Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). CDC data found that, from 2009-2010, people who slept six or fewer hours per night, snored or unintentionally fell asleep during the day were most likely to fall asleep behind the wheel. They also identified binge drinking and unsafe seatbelt use as linked to a higher risk of falling asleep while driving. The report data was culled from information from the 92,102 respondents in 10 states and Puerto Rico to the 2011–2012 Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System surveys. Read more on transportation.

Study: Adults with Dyslexia Far More Likely to Have Been Abused as Children
Approximately one third of dyslexic adults report having been physically abused as children, according to a new study in the Journal of Interpersonal Violence. The percentage was far less—seven percent—for adults without dyslexia. Researchers say more work is needed to identify the cause or causes for this disparity. “It is possible that for some children, the presence of dyslexia and related learning problems may place them at relatively higher risk for physical abuse, perhaps due to adult frustrations with chronic learning failure" said study co-author, Stephen Hooper, professor of Psychiatry and Pediatrics, and Associate Dean and Chair of Allied Health Sciences at the University of North Carolina School of Medicine, in a release. "Alternatively, given the known association between brain dysfunction and maltreatment, it could be that the experience of physical abuse may also contribute to and/or exacerbate such learning problems, secondary to increased neurologic burden." Read more on violence.

Poultry Recall Connected to Massive Salmonella Outbreak
Sixteen months after the start of a salmonella outbreak that has sickened nearly 600 people across 27 states, Foster Farms has announced it will recall contaminated chicken that has been linked to the outbreak. The California-based poultry company said the recalled products—produced at three facilities on March 8, 10 and 11 of this year—were distributed in California, Hawaii, Washington, Arizona, Nevada, Idaho, Utah, Oregon and Alaska. "This recall is prompted by a single illness associated with specific fresh chicken product, but in the fullest interest of food safety, Foster Farms has broadened the recall to encompass all products packaged at that time. Foster Farms regrets any illness associated with its products," said the company in a statement. Read more on food safety.

Tags: Food Safety, News roundups, Public health, Transportation, Violence