Apr 8 2014
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Recommended Reading: FDA Approves Handheld Treatment for Prescription Drug Overdose

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In an effort to combat the growing epidemic of prescription drug abuse and overdose, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has approved a small, easy-to-use injector—similar to an EpiPen—that can be used to revive people who have stopped breathing or lost consciousness from an opioid drug overdose. The device, called Evzio, provides a single dose of naloxone, which is the standard treatment for opioid overdoses but up until now was mostly only available in hospitals and other medical settings.

The device, expected to be available starting this summer, will enable early intervention that increases the chances of survival. According to the National Center for Injury Prevention and Control , nationally, sales of prescription painkillers per capita have quadrupled since 1999—and the number of fatal poisonings due to prescription painkillers has also quadrupled.

The FDA’s approval comes at a critical time. In October of last year, Trust for America’s Health released a report that found that a very small number of states are implementing more than just a few promising strategies that have been identified to help combat the widespread drug abuse that continues to increase across the United States. The report, Prescription Drug Abuse: Strategies to Stop the Epidemic, which was funded by a grant from the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, showed that only two states—New Mexico and Vermont—have implemented all ten strategies. TFAH also released an interactive tool with state-by-state prescription drug overdose death rates and state scores on the 10 key steps to curb abuse.

Carl R. Sullivan III, MD, director of the addictions program at West Virginia University, said the FDA’s approval of Evzio “is a big deal, and I hope [it] gets wide attention,” according to The New York Times. “It’s pretty simple: Having these things in the hands of people around drug addicts just makes sense because you’re going to prevent unnecessary mortality.”

Read the full story from The New York Times.

Tags: Addiction and substance abuse, Food and Drug Administration, Prescription drugs, Recommended Reading