Apr 2 2014
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Public Health News Roundup: April 2

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Mistrust, Perceived Discrimination Affect Young Adult Latinos’ Satisfaction with Health Care
Mistrust of the medical community and perceived discrimination can affect how satisfied young adult Latinos are with their health care, which in turn can influence health outcomes, affect participation in health care programs under the Affordable Care Act and contribute to disparities in health care access, according to a new study in The Journal of Rural Health. Researchers surveyed 387 young adult Latinos, ages 18-25, finding that approximately 73 percent were moderately or very satisfied with their health care, but among those who were not, medical mistrust and perceived discrimination were found to be factors. The researchers recommend improving “cultural competency” among health care providers—from the doctors to the receptionists to the lab technicians—to help ensure Latinos are treated with respect and dignity, and also that a bilingual/bicultural workforce may be more effective at building trust. “Trust is huge; it allows patients to disclose concerns and be honest,” said study co-author S. Marie Harvey, associate dean and professor of public health at Oregon State University in a release. Read more on health disparities.

FDA Approves First Sublingual Home Treatment for Hay Fever
The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has approved the first sublingual—or under the tongue—allergen extract for use in the United States. Designed to treat hay fever with or without conjunctivitis that results from exposure to certain grass pollens in people ages 10-65, the first dose is administered in a health care providers office so that the patient can be observed for any adverse reactions, but can then be taken at home. Approximately 30 million Americans and 500 million people worldwide are affected by hay fever, also known as allergic rhinitis, which can cause repetitive sneezing; nasal itching; runny nose; nasal congestion; and itchy and watery eyes. “While there is no cure for grass pollen allergies, they can be managed through treatment and avoiding exposure to the pollen,” said Karen Midthun, MD, director of the FDA’s Center for Biologics Evaluation and Research, in a release. “The approval of Oralair provides an alternative to allergy shots that must be given in a health care provider’s office.” Read more on the FDA.

New Report Analyzes Link Between Metro Areas and Overall Health
People who live in compact, connected metropolitan regions are more likely to see their incomes rise, have lower household costs, have more transportation options and live longer, safer and healthier lives, according to Measuring Sprawl 2014, a new report from Smart Growth America and the University of Utah’s Metropolitan Research Center. The report looks at 221 major U.S. metropolitan areas, ranking them based on how sprawling or compact they are as well as examining how sprawl relates to factors such as economic mobility; the cost of housing and transportation; life expectancy; obesity; chronic disease and safety. “Smart growth strategies are about making life better for everyone in a community,” said Geoff Anderson, President and CEO of Smart Growth America. “If policymakers are looking for ways to lower costs for their constituents, improve public health and support their broader economy, they need to be thinking about how to improve their development.” Read more on community health.

Tags: Community Health, Food and Drug Administration, Health disparities, News roundups, Public and Community Health