Apr 29 2014
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NIH Spearheads Private/Public Collaboration to Improve Care for Several Serious Health Conditions, Including Alzheimer’s

The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) today released the 2014 update for the National Plan to Address Alzheimer’s Disease, which includes a determination to accelerate efforts to identify the earliest stages of Alzheimer’s disease and to develop and test targets for intervention. That acceleration has new momentum this year with the announcement several weeks ago by the National Institutes of Health (NIH) that it has formed a first-if-its-kind partnership—the Accelerated Medicines Partnership (AMP) with ten pharmaceutical companies and several nonprofit organizations—to help identify and validate new diagnostics and drugs for several diseases that impact tens of millions of Americans and their families. The three other conditions are Type II diabetes, lupus and rheumatoid arthritis.

“Despite the fact that there have been huge revolutions in science from discovery of the double-helical structure of DNA, to recombinant DNA, to all sorts of interesting technological advances...it still takes too long and costs too much and we fail too often in the development of new drugs,” said Kathy Hudson, PHD, deputy director for Science, Outreach and Policy at the NIH, in a conversation with NewPublicHealth.

Hudson said a key development that drove the creation of the AMP is a new center at NIH, the National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences, which she says will work on how to “create new methods and new approaches that will decrease the failure rate and decrease the timeline for delivering new, important medicines to patients’ medicine cabinets.” Hudson said it currently takes about 15 years and more than $1 billion to develop a new drug and the failure rates are quite high at every step because of safety and because of efficacy.

“The new partnership effort is really targeted towards trying to boost the success of the pipeline by improving efficacy. What we’re exploring in this partnership is using a whole bunch of different new approaches and new technologies to try to identify higher quality targets that can enter the drug development pipeline,” said Hudson.

The private sector drug firms will match NIH dollars one-for–one. The other key contribution, according to Hudson, is that “industry scientists and NIH scientists and academic scientists all come at these problems with slightly different perspectives and experience and expertise, and by combining those together we’re really getting a research plan that is distinctive from what any one of us would have generated by ourselves.”

Hudson said another critical issue that is helping the collaboration is the fact that “the ground rules have been so clearly laid out about us working in a precompetitive space, about all of the data being broadly shared not just with the participants but with the entire scientific community.” Even with the collaboration, identifying and testing new compounds will take years. How to commercialize successful products will be part of the ongoing discussions.

>>Bonus Link: Read more about the Accelerated Medicines Partnership

Tags: Aging, National Institutes of Health, Partnerships, Public-private partnerships