Apr 3 2014
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2014 Preparedness Summit: Disasters Don’t Take a Break for a Preparedness Summit

At the start of the 2014 Preparedness Summit meeting this week in Atlanta, Summit chair Jack Herrmann took a moment to remember the lives lost in the mudslide in Washington State last week and took note of the many public health workers who left their communities to help in the rescue and recovery. Since then, two more major disasters have occurred—the earthquake and tsunami waves in Chile and the shooting yesterday at Fort Hood. Conversations about those events, and other events back home that need the attention of public health staff even while they are on travel at a preparedness conference, can be heard in the hallways during breaks in the sessions as people who train for such disasters mourn the losses and offer their assistance.

Tom Hipper, Public Health Planner at the Center for Public Health Readiness and Communication at Drexel University in Philadelphia, had some advice for communications by public health departments not involved in a disaster earlier this week. Hipper advises delaying planned, non-urgent communication and sending out empathetic messages about the disasters which can help build community and resilience and give people a chance to become involved by expressing and sharing their sentiments. Hipper says empathetic communication can be a bonding experience and lets people know that others will be thinking about and trying to help them in the event of an emergency in their community.

In addition, says Hipper, while previously people outside a disaster area could often only help by donating money, they can now also be “digital volunteers” by posting and retweeting accurate information from credible sources about a disaster to let people impacted by an emergency know they’re not alone.

The Center maintains and updates a list of important preparedness resources.

>> Bonus Content: Read a previous NewPublicHealth Q&A with Jonathan Woodson on the U.S. Department of Defense’s overall approach to wellness and prevention for military, veterans and their families as part of our National Prevention Strategy series. 

Tags: Disasters, Emergency Preparedness and Response