Feb 28 2014
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Public Health News Roundup: February 28

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WIC Expands to Offer More Options to 9 Million Poor Women and Children
Newly announced changes to the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants and Children—also known as WIC—will expand access to fruits, vegetables and whole grains for approximately 9 million poor women and young children. The changes include an increase over 30 percent, or $2 per month, in the allowance for each child's fruit and vegetable purchases. They also allow fresh produce instead of jarred infant food for babies. The changes, which were recommended by the Institute of Medicine, mark the first comprehensive revisions to the voucher program allowances since 1980. Read more on nutrition.

Survey Finds Majority of Hispanic Adults Are Not Confident in Their Understanding of Key Insurance Terms
While the majority of white, non-Hispanic adults feel confident in their understanding of key insurance terms, the same cannot be said for Hispanics. According to the Urban Institute’s Health Reform Monitoring Survey (HRMS), only one in four Hispanic adults express confidence in their understanding of terms such as “premium,” “copayment” and “deductible.” This disparity is an impediment to Affordable Care Act marketplace and Medicaid enrollment. The findings demonstrate the need for culturally appropriate education campaigns and bilingual navigators to provide assistance in target communities. The quarterly HRMS is funded by the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation and the Ford Foundation. Read more on health disparities.

New Program to Train Police Officers in Bleeding Control for Mass Casualty Victims
As part of ongoing efforts to increase the number of survivors of active shooter or mass casualty incidents, more than 36,000 police officers across the country will receive bleeding control kits and training this year. The goal is to train officers to slow or stop bleeding at the scene before other first responders arrive. The five-step “THREAT” approach:

  • T - Threat suppression
  • H – Hemorrhage control
  • RE – Rapid Extrication to safety
  • A – Assessment by medical providers
  • T – Transport to definitive care.

The initiative is led by the Hartford Consensus, a collaborative group of trauma surgeons, federal law enforcement and emergency responders, and driven by the American College of Surgeons, the Federal Bureau of Investigation, the Major Cities Chiefs Association and the Prehospital Trauma Life Support program.  “Controlling hemorrhage has to be a core law enforcement tactic,” said Alexander Eastman, MD, MPH, FACS, chief of trauma at UT Southwestern/Parkland Memorial Hospital and Dallas Police Department lieutenant, in a release. “We saw the dramatic impact of this tactic in the Tucson, Ariz. shooting in 2011. With training and tourniquets, law enforcement officers will save lives – many lives.” Read more on violence.

Tags: Health disparities, News roundups, Nutrition, Public health, Violence