Feb 25 2014
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Public Health News Roundup: February 25

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Cold Winter Raises Concerns about Energy Insecurity
A new brief by researchers at the Mailman School of Public Health at Columbia University looks at energy insecurity (EI), which is measured by the proportion of household energy expenditures relative to household income. EI tends to impact low-income families in part because they often live in older homes and apartments that haven’t been constructed to conserve heat.

Key findings of the brief include:

  • More than half of families affected by economic EI are living in poverty (below 100 percent of the federal poverty level) and about one third are extremely poor.
  • Approximately half of all households facing economic EI are black/African-American and about one-third are white.
  • Geographically, the largest proportion (46 percent) of children in households with economic EI resides in the South.
  • Over half of families with economic EI are renters; 41 percent are homeowners.

According to the Mailman researchers, the main safety net program for EI, the Low-Income Home Energy Assistance Program (LIHEAP), covers only a fraction of the overall need. Of the estimated 10-15 million homes eligible for benefits in 2012, 5.5 million received assistance for reasons such as lack of awareness by people who could benefit and program budget cuts. Read more on poverty.

Many Adults with Depression Symptoms Have Not Consulted a Professional
A new report by the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) finds that close to 40 percent of the 15 million American adults who experienced a major depressive episode in the past year did not talk to a counselor or health provider. A major depressive episode is defined as a period of at least two weeks when a person experienced a depressed mood or loss of interest or pleasure in daily activities and had at least four of seven additional symptoms reflecting the criteria as described in the fourth edition of the American Psychiatric Association’s Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of the Mental Disorders (DSM-IV). “This report shows that too many Americans still needlessly suffer in silence instead of reaching out to providers for help in getting them on the road to recovery through effective treatment and supports,” said Paolo del Vecchio, the director of SAMHSA’s Center for Mental Health Services. “We are raising awareness about the hope for recovery from these conditions, helping communities identify their behavioral health needs, and increasing education about access to treatment for all Americans through the Affordable Care Act and the new parity protections for insurance coverage.” Read more about mental health.

EPA Proposes New Safety Measures to Protect Farm Workers from Pesticide Exposure
The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has announced proposed revisions to the Worker Protection Standard to protect the nation’s two million farm workers and their families from pesticide exposure. The EPA is proposing significant improvements to worker training regarding the safe usage of pesticides, including how to prevent and effectively treat pesticide exposure. Increased training and signage will inform farm workers about their protections under the law. The EPA has also proposed that children under 16 be legally barred from handling all pesticides, with an exemption for family farms. The revisions are based on more than a decade of extensive stakeholder input by federal and state partners and from across the agricultural community including farm workers, farmers and industry. Read more on the Environmental Protection Agency.

Tags: Environmental Protection Agency, Mental Health, News roundups, Poverty, Public and Community Health