Jan 13 2014
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Recommended Reading: How Much Noise is Too Much Noise?

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A new report from the University of Michigan School of Public Health and published in the journal Environmental Health Perspectives urges government at the local, state and federal levels to address noise pollution, which the study estimates impacts 104 million Americans. The researchers say noise not only impacts hearing, but also contributes to heart disease, hypertension, sleep disturbances, stress, learning difficulties and even injuries.

"Everyone complains about noise, yet we do virtually nothing about it in this country," says Richard Neitzel, PHD, assistant professor of environmental health sciences at the School of Public Health and a co-author of the new report. “Noise is really up there in terms of health problems it causes, but it gets no attention—especially compared to other common exposures such as air pollution.”

Links between noise and health impacts are still being studied, but stress is thought to be a key factor.

The report suggests that noise be included in the federal public health agenda and recommends areas for regulation to reduce noise levels, including setting emission levels, improving information dissemination about the dangers of noise and a call to conduct more research to better understand the impact of noise on the population. Neitzel’s report includes recommendations for the National Prevention Strategy, a strategy to achieve prevention efforts across federal agencies:

  • Exert noise control through direct regulation, setting maximum emissions levels.
  • Require emissions disclosure on products, such as children’s toys.
  • Improve information dissemination about the dangers of noise.
  • Conduct more research to fully understand the impact of noise on the population.

The researchers also suggest ways state and local governments could fill the gaps:

  • Enact regulations on sources of noise that aren’t covered by the Environmental Protection Agency or other federal agencies.
  • Adopt procurement policies to reduce community noise caused by construction, emergency vehicles and maintenance equipment.
  • Take steps to build or renovate housing that protects people from noise health initiatives across the federal government.

>>Bonus Link: Read a NewPublicHealth blog about a study by a visiting attorney fellow of the Network for Public Health Law on the health impacts of environmental noise.

Tags: Environmental health, Public health, Environment, Environmental Protection Agency, Recommended Reading