Jan 27 2014
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Public Health News Roundup: January 27

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Study: 20 U.S. Children Hospitalized for Gunshots Each Day
Each day approximately 20 children across the United States are hospitalized for a firearm injury, with more than 6 percent—or about one child a day—ultimately dying, according to a new study in the journal Pediatrics. Researchers from the Yale School of Medicine analyzed health records for 2009, finding a total of 7,391 hospitalizations and 453 deaths for children and adolescents younger than age 20. While most hospitalizations were for assault, for children younger than age 10 the cause was unintentional or accidental injury approximately 75 percent of the time. Firearm injuries can require extensive follow-up treatment, including rehabilitation; home health care; hospital readmission from delayed effects of the injury; and mental health or social services. "These data highlight the toll of gun-related injuries that extends beyond high-profile cases, and those children and adolescents who die before being hospitalized,” said John Leventhal, MD. “Pediatricians and other health care providers can play an important role in preventing these injuries through counseling about firearm safety, including safe storage.” Read more on violence.

Study: Integrating Vegetation into Transportation Planning Improve Air Quality, Public Health Overall
The strategic integration of trees, plants and other vegetation into transportation planning may have a positive effect on air quality specifically and public health overall, according to a new article from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, the U.S. Forest Service and other organizations. The study, which appeared in TR News Magazine, looked at short-term and long-term methods to reduce human exposure to pollutants along major transportation corridors. “Properly designed and managed roadside vegetation can help us breathe a little easier,” said Greg McPherson, PhD, research forester at the U.S. Forest Service’s Pacific Southwest Research Station. “Besides reducing pollutants in the air, these buffers can protect water quality, store carbon, cool urban heat islands and soften views along our streetscapes. They are essential components of green infrastructure in cities and towns.” Read more on transportation.

Quality Improvement Initiative Sees Significant Improvement in Teen Asthma Management
A quality improvement initiative from the Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center has proven to significantly improve asthma outcomes for teenagers, a notoriously difficult demographic to help due to overall poor adherence to treatment. The study appeared in the journal Pediatrics. The researchers focused their efforts on 322 primary care patients with asthma, of which only about 10 percent had optimally well-controlled asthma. Starting in 2007, that percentage grew to 30 percent by 2009 and remained steady through the study’s end in 2011. The researchers also saw patient confidence in the ability to manage their asthma climb from 70 percent to 85 percent. "We were able to achieve sustained improvement in patients whose chronic asthma is not well-controlled by implementing a package of chronic care interventions,” said Maria Britto, MD, director of the Center for Innovation in Chronic Disease Care at Cincinnati Children's and senior author of the study. “These included standardized and evidence-based care; self-management support, such as self-monitoring by using diaries and journals; care coordination and active outreach among healthcare providers; linking these teens to community resources; and following-up with patients whose chronic asthma is not well-controlled." Read more on pediatrics.

Tags: Public health, News roundups, Violence, Transportation, Pediatrics