Dec 31 2013
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Public Health News Roundup: December 31

Help for Keeping Those New Year’s Resolutions from the Federal Government
Losing weight
, helping others and quitting smoking are among the top New Year’s resolutions of the American people, according to the General Services Administration (GSA), the agency that oversees the business of the federal government. Links on the GSA site offer strategies, websites and help lines for 2014 resolutions. Click on the quit smoking link on the GSA resolution list for example, and you’ll find yourself at smokefree.gov, which offers tools you can access immediately, even before 2014 begins. Read more on community health.

NIH to Fund Research on Workforce Diversity Programs
The National Institutes of Health (NIH) will establish a national consortium to develop, implement and evaluate approaches to encourage individuals of all backgrounds to start and stay in biomedical research careers. “There is a compelling need to promote diversity in the biomedical research workforce,” said NIH Director Francis S. Collins MD, PhD. “A lack of diversity jeopardizes our ability to carry out the NIH mission because innovation and problem solving require diverse perspectives. The future of biomedical research rests on engaging highly talented researchers from all groups and preparing them to be successful in the NIH-funded workforce.” Read a new JAMA study that finds that minority physicians care for the majority of underserved patients in the United States. Read more on health disparities.

Twenty Percent of Drivers Admit They Often Drive Too Fast
A recent survey by the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) finds that twenty percent of drivers say they “try to get where I am going as fast as I can." According to NHTSA, speeding-related deaths nationwide account for nearly a third of all traffic fatalities each year, taking close to 10,000 lives. And despite acknowledging the safety benefits of speed limits and reasons drivers should follow them, more than a quarter of those surveyed admitted "speeding is something I do without thinking" and "I enjoy the feeling of driving fast." And sixteen percent felt that "driving over the speed limit is not dangerous for skilled drivers." Most alarming, drivers with the least experience behind the wheel—those 16-20 years old—admitted to speeding more frequently than any other age group. And more than one in ten drivers ages 16-20 reported at least one speeding-related crash in the past five years, compared to 4 percent for the population as a whole. Read more on injury prevention.

Tags: Community Health, Health disparities, Injury Prevention, News roundups, Public health