Nov 22 2013
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Recommended Reading: Sports Revelry Can Do Serious—and Permanent—Damage to Hearing

Earlier this year, fans of the National Football League’s Seattle Seahawks set a record for outdoor stadium noise with a volume of 136.6 decibels. That record stood for a mere four weeks—the Kansas City Chiefs hit 137.5.

The fans revel in it—both records were set in part through the encouragement of fan organizations—and this record-seeking behavior is encouraged by teams and the league.

“Fans know they are going to a football game and not searching for a book at a library,” said Brian McCarthy, an NFL spokesman.

Credit: Harold Hollingsworth

However, according to a recent story in The New York Times, such loud revelry at sporting events comes with severe costs for people’s hearing health. Elliott Berger, an acoustical engineer at 3M, said the average volume during an NFL game hovers at around 90 decibels. Considering the fact that an average NFL game lasts about three hours—and the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health recommends limiting exposure to levels that high to 60 minutes—by going to football games people are putting themselves at serious risk for partial deafness and ringing, or even hyperacusis, an intolerance to sound that sometimes can cause pain.

While this may be alright (although very unhealthy) for the casual fans who only attend a few games per year, people who already have auditory problems are at substantial risk. And it’s something that even a simple set of earplugs or earmuffs can prevent.

“People think it’s cool or funny or whatever, but there is increasing evidence that if your ears are ringing, damage is happening,” said M. Charles Liberman, a professor of otology at Harvard Medical School and the director of a hearing research lab at the Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary. “There’s something irreversible going on. It’s only going to worsen as you get older.”

Read the full story at The New York Times.

Tags: Injury Prevention, Preventive care, Recommended Reading, Risky behavior