Nov 27 2013
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Public Health News Roundup: November 27

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Study: U.S. Graphic Warning Labels Could Get 8.6M Smokers to Quit
A new study out of Canada indicates that the U.S. Food and Drug Administration may have underestimated the potential impact of graphic warning labels on tobacco products. From 2000 to 2009, the warning labels cut Canada's smoking rate somewhere between 12 and 20 percent, which would be the equivalent of between 5.3 million and 8.6 million U.S. smokers. That's also 33 to 53 times larger than the FDA's estimates when they pushed for the warning labels--and when the tobacco industry successfully challenged the measure, with the court pointing to the low impact as one of the reasons for the ruling. "Our analyses corrected for errors in the FDA's analysis, concluding that the effect of graphic warnings on smoking rates would be much stronger than the FDA found," said Jidong Huang, MD, the study's author. "Our results provide much stronger support for the FDA's revised proposal for graphic warnings, which we hope will be forthcoming in the near future." Read more on tobacco.

Expanding Nurse Practitioner Abilities Could Save Patients $472M by 2015
Expanding which health services nurse practitioners at retail health clinics can provide could save at least $34 per visit, or as much as $472 million in health costs by 2015, according to a new study in the journal Health Affairs. The estimated 6,000 retail health clinics, often found in chain pharmacies or "big box" stores, provide walk-in care for minor health problems. The rules for nurse practitioners vary from state to state, with some allowing them to prescribe medications and practice independently of a doctor's supervision. Researchers looked at insurance claims from 2004 through 2007, finding that the state's that grant wider latitude also tend to see lower costs for the patients:

  • $704 -- Average cost of treatment in the 14 days after a traditional doctor's office visit
  • $543 -- Average cost of care during and after a retail visit in states where nurse practitioners had no independence and could not prescribe medication
  • $484 -- Average cost of care during and after a retail visit in states where nurse practitioners were allowed to practice without the supervision of a doctor
  • $509 -- Average cost of care during and after a retail visit in states where nurse practitioners were allowed to practice without supervision and prescribe medication

Read more on access to health care.

New Estimate Puts 2009 Swine Flu Global Death Toll at More than 200K
The death toll from the 2009 swine flu epidemic was likely far higher than previously believed, according to a new study in the journal PLoS Medicine. Previously, the total stood at about 18,500 laboratory-confirmed deaths, though experts considered that to be a low estimate because it only factored in confirmed cases of H1N1. A new study, bringing together 60 researchers in 26 countries, now places the toll at as many as 203,000 global deaths--or 11 times higher than the previous estimate. "This study confirms that the H1N1 virus killed many more people globally than originally believed," study lead author Lone Simonsen, a research professor in the department of global health at the George Washington University School of Public Health and Health Services. "We also found that the mortality burden of this pandemic fell most heavily on younger people and those living in certain parts of the Americas." Read more on global health.

Tags: Public health, News roundups, Tobacco, Access to Health Care, Global Health