Nov 22 2013
Comments

Public Health News Roundup: November 22

file

CDC Report Finds Health Disparities, Inequalities Persist across the U.S. Population
The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has released a new report examining the disparities in mortality and disease risk as they relate to income, education level, sex, race, ethnicity, employment status and sexual orientation. CDC Health Disparities and Inequalities Report — United States, 2013 is the second CDC report to take this wide look at the U.S. population. Among its key findings:

  • The overall birth rate for teens 15-19 years old dropped 18 percent from 2007 to 2010, although it varied widely from state to state
  • People who are Hispanic, are low wage earners, were born outside of the United States, have no education beyond high school, or are male are more likely to work in an occupation in which workers are more likely than average to be injured or become ill
  • Binge drinking is most common for people ages 18-34, men, non-Hispanic whites and people with higher household incomes

“It is clear that more needs to be done to address the gaps and to better assist Americans disproportionately impacted by the burden of poor health,” said Chesley Richards, MD, MPH., director of CDC’s Office of Public Health Scientific Services, which produced the report. “We hope that this report will lead to interventions that will allow all Americans, particularly those most harmed by health inequalities, to live healthier and more productive lives.” Read more on health disparities.

HUD Grants to Help Transform Distressed Communities into Thriving Communities
The U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) is granting approximately $4.37 million to help nine areas transform their public or other HUD-assisted housing and distressed neighborhoods into thriving communities. Fifty- two communities had applied for the Choice Neighborhoods Planning Grants. The agency’s Choice Neighborhoods Initiative supports locally-driven economic developments to create renewed, sustainable communities, with a focus on creating energy-efficient, mixed-income housing that has easy access to high-quality services, education programs, early learning programs, public assets and public transportation. Full details on each community can be found here. Read more on housing.

Study: Certain Health Behaviors Tied to Complication-free Pregnancies
Women who engage in certain healthy behaviors—and avoid certain unhealthy ones—are more likely to have complication-free pregnancies, according to a new study in the journal BMJ. An analysis of health data on more than 5,600 women found that eating fruit, having a healthy weight, having lower blood pressure, having a job, and stopping drug and alcohol abuse at 15-20 weeks of gestation "may increase the likelihood of normal pregnancy outcomes," according to Lucy Chappell, of the Women's Health Academic Center of King's College London. The most common pregnancy-related complications are babies who were too small for their gestational age, high blood pressure, preterm birth and preeclampsia. Read more on maternal and infant health.

Tags: Health disparities, Housing, Maternal and Infant Health, News roundups, Public and Community Health