Nov 4 2013
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Public Health News Roundup: November 4

Firearm Injuries Cost $16B in U.S. Health Care in Less than a Decade
Firearm injuries cost more than $16 billion in hospital care between from 2000 to 2008, according to new research to be presented today at the American Public Health Association’s 141st Annual Meeting in Boston. The 275,939 victims spent approximately 1.7 million days in the hospital, for an average stay of 6.7 days and an average cost of medical treatment of $59,620. About one in three patients did not have insurance. “The impact is probably much higher than $16 billion since the years of life lost, disability, lack of productivity, societal well-being and emotional turmoil associated with such injuries is far-reaching,” said Min Kyeong Lee, DMD, Annual Meeting presenter. “This is one of the foremost reasons why health care costs in this country have gotten out of control and underlies the need for better preventive policies.” Read more on violence.

Study: Secondhand Smoke in the Workplace Down Overall, But Certain Groups Still at Risk
While recent policies and regulations have helped reduce the overall exposure rates of secondhand smoke in the workplace, certain professions continue to experience high rates, according to new findings to be presented today at the American Public Health Association’s 141st Annual Meeting. The study looked at exposure rates in Massachusetts since 2004, when its Smoke-Free Workplace Law was enacted to require all enclosed workplaces to be smoke free. However, that means that workers in installation, repair and maintenance still experience an overall secondhand smoke exposure rate of 37.4 percent; the national rate in 2010 was 5.4 percent. “We’re seeing a steady decline in prevalence of exposure, but it’s clear that there are still specific groups of workers that deserve our attention,” said Kathleen Fitzsimmons, MPH, lead researcher of the study. “Findings like these that combine information about occupation and environmental tobacco smoke provide helpful information for evaluating comprehensive statewide smoke-free workplace laws and for targeting interventions to reduce risks.” Read more on tobacco.

Study: HPV Screenings Better than Pap Tests at Protecting Against Invasive Cervical Cancer
Human papillomavirus (HPV) screenings are both more effective than Pap tests when it comes to screening against invasive cervical cancer, according to a new study in the journal The Lancet. Researchers analyzed the results of four clinical trials in Europe covering more than 175,000 women ages 20 to 64. The studies tracked them women for an average of 6.5 years after one of the screening types, finding that they were about equal in protection levels for the first 2.5 years, but that following that short time frame HPV screening provided as much as 70 percent greater protection. The findings were particularly significant in women ages 30 to 35. Read more on cancer.

Tags: Public health, News roundups, Violence, Tobacco, Cancer, APHA