Oct 10 2013
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Public Health News Roundup: October 10

University of Maryland Study Shows Need for Improved Communication by Dental Professionals
New research from the University of Maryland School of Public Health found that a majority of dentists and dental hygienists are not regularly using recommended communication techniques with their patients that can contribute to improved oral health literacy and prevention of oral disease. The researchers, who published their findings in the Journal of Dental Hygiene, surveyed 540 Maryland dental hygienists to determine the frequency of the use of 18 recommended communication techniques to effectively communicate science-based information to patients. Only one basic technique—use of simple language—was used by more than 90 percent of dental offices, according to survey responders. The survey also found that dental professionals who had taken a communication course in a non-dental educational setting were more likely to regularly use varying types of communication techniques. Read more on health literacy.

Study: Online Medical Searches Not a Good Idea for People Who Struggle With Uncertainty, Anxiety
People who struggle with uncertainty and anxiety might want to stay away from online health information searches, according to a new study in the journal Cyberpsychology, Behavior and Social Networking. The study, which included 512 healthy men and women with a mean age of about 33, analyzed how online searchers affected their anxiety, as well as their reactions to statements such as "I always want to know what the future has in store for me" and "I spend most of my time worrying about my health." "If I'm someone who doesn't like uncertainty, I may become more anxious, search further, monitor my body more, go to the doctor more frequently—and the more you search, the more you consider the possibilities," said Thomas Fergus, an assistant professor of psychology and neuroscience at Baylor University. "If I see a site about traumatic brain injuries and have difficulties tolerating uncertainty, I might be more likely to worry that's the cause of the bump on my head." These persistent worries can increase the likelihood of worrying about potential medical bills, disability and job loss, which in turn can lead to even more online searches, doctors visits, unnecessary medical tests and stress. Read more about technology.

Study: TV Drug Ads Are Often Misleading
A study on the veracity of television drug ads by researchers at Dartmouth and the University of Wisconsin-Madison found that six out of 10 claims could potentially mislead a viewer. The study was published in the Journal of General Internal Medicine. The researchers found misleading claims among television ads for both prescription and nonprescription drugs, and that some of the ads omitted or exaggerated information. The researchers studied the 6:30 to 7 p.m. portion of nightly news broadcast, which often contains drug ads, and reviewed 168 different drug advertisements that aired between 2008 and 2010. Trained researchers classified the ads as truthful, potentially misleading or false. The researchers found only one in ten claims were false, while six in ten were misleading and included errors such as leaving out important information, exaggerating information, providing opinions or making meaningless associations with lifestyles. Read more on prescription drugs.

Tags: Public health, News roundups, Health Literacy, Technology, Prescription drugs