Oct 7 2013
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Public Health News Roundup: October 7

Study: Top Athletes Endorse Junk Food More Often Than Healthy Food
A new study of professional athletes’ food and beverage endorsements found that more often than not their paid support is given to products that are energy-dense and nutrient-poor, according to a new study in the journal Pediatrics. The study looked at 512 brands endorsed by 100 different athletes, finding that “Seventy-nine percent of the 62 food products in athlete-endorsed advertisements were energy-dense” and “93.4% of the 46 advertised beverages had 100% of calories from added sugar.” Denver Broncos player Peyton Manning and Miami Heat player LeBron James had the most endorsements for the energy-dense, nutrient-poor food and beverages. "I hope this paper inspires some reflection on the part of America's athletes and professional sports leagues, as well as all other celebrities for that matter,” said Center for Science in the Public Interest Executive Director Michael F. Jacobson, in a statement. Read more on nutrition.

U.S. Task Force Recommends Against Blood Pressure Screening for Kids, Teens
Despite recommendations from several expert groups, the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force is not recommending that health care professionals respond to the growing obesity crisis by screening children and teens for high blood pressure. The panel concluded that more study into the issue is needed, and that in the mean time there are other, known avenues toward lowering youth obesity and improving cardiovascular health. "We don't know if lowering blood pressure in youth leads to improved cardiovascular health in adulthood,” said panel member Kirsten Bibbins-Domingo, MD. “We also don't know the long-term benefits and harms for children and adolescents who initiate blood pressure medications when they are young. While there is much we don't know, we do know that eating a healthy diet, being active, and maintaining a normal weight are ways children and teens can improve their cardiovascular health." Read more on heart health.

Study: Tobacco Advertisements Connecting with Young Kids in Many Low-, Middle-income Countries
The global pervasiveness of tobacco advertisements means that most very young children in many low-and middle-income countries are familiar with cigarette brands, and nearly 70 percent of kids ages 5 and 6 can identify at least one cigarette logo, according to a new study in the journal Pediatrics. The study is from the Institute for Global Tobacco Control at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. The findings demonstrate the significant steps countries and public health organizations still need to take to limit the influence of tobacco ads. “Evidence-based strategies exist to reduce the ability of tobacco companies to market their products to children, such as implementing and enforcing bans on tobacco advertising, promotion and sponsorship,” said Joanna Cohen, PhD, co-author of the study and director on the institute. “Putting large picture warnings on the front and back of cigarette packs and requiring plain and standardized packaging, as Australia has done, also helps to reduce the attractiveness of cigarette packs among young children.” Read more on global health.

Tags: Global Health, Heart and Vascular Health, News roundups, Nutrition, Obesity, Pediatrics, Public and Community Health, Tobacco