Aug 23 2013
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Public Health News Roundup: August 23

Public Health Accreditation Board Awards National Accreditation to Five High-Performing Health Departments
The Public Health Accreditation Board (PHAB) this week awarded five-year national accreditation status to five more public health departments. The decisions bring the number of public health agencies now recognized by PHAB as high-performing health departments to 19. PHAB is the independent organization that administers the national public health accreditation program, which aims to improve and protect the health of the public by advancing the quality and performance of the nation’s Tribal, state, local and territorial health departments.

Accreditation status was awarded Aug. 20 to:

  • Central Michigan District Health Department, Mount Pleasant, Mich.
  • Chicago Department of Public Health, Chicago, Ill.
  • El Paso County Public Health, Colorado Springs, Colo.
  • Kansas City Missouri Health Department, Kansas City, Mo.
  • Tulsa Health Department, Tulsa, Okla.

Read more on accreditation.

Needlestick, Sharps-related Injuries Cost Health Care Industry $1B Every Year
Improved safety-engineered devices, combined with better education and techniques, could save the health care industry more than $1 billion in preventable costs every year, according to a Safe in Common review of U.S. healthcare industry statistics. With approximately 1,000 skin puncture injuries per day in U.S. hospitals, needlestick and sharps-related injuries affect more than half a million health care personnel every year—both physically and emotionally. "The desperate need for attention to the risk of needlestick injuries and their dangerous implications for both patients and personnel are startling when you look directly at the impact to healthcare costs," said Safe in Common chairperson Mary Foley, PhD, RN. "Learning how to permanently prevent these types of injuries—with more education and the introduction of advanced safety devices—will ultimately reduce a significant cost burden and, most importantly, the pain and emotional trauma that the needlestick victims and their families are enduring." Read more on prevention.

Study: Volunteering Linked to Greater Happiness, Longer Lives
Volunteering is not only linked to greater happiness and improved mental health, but could also help people live longer, according to a new study in the journal BMC Public Health. The analysis of 40 published studies found that volunteers had a 20 percent lower risk of death, as well as lower levels depression and increased satisfaction with their lives. "It is still unclear whether biological and cultural factors and social resources that are often associated with better health and survival are also associated with a willingness to volunteer in the first place,” said leader Suzanne Richards, PhD, of the University of Exeter Medical School in England. "The challenge now is to encourage people from more diverse backgrounds to take up volunteering, and then to measure whether improvements arise for them," she explained. People often cite a desire to give back to their community as a reason for volunteering; gaining work experience and meeting new people are also popular reasons. Approximately 27 percent of U.S. adults and 23 percent of European adults actively volunteer. Read more on aging.

Tags: Public health, News roundups, Accreditation, Prevention, Aging