Oct 17 2011
Comments

Public Health News Roundup: October 17

AAP Expands Ages for Diagnosis and Treatment of ADHD in Children

A new policy statement from the American Academy of Pediatrics finds that emerging evidence makes it possible to diagnose and manage attention deficit disorder (ADHD) in children from ages 4 to 18. The previous AAP guidelines covered children ages 6 to 12. According to the Academy, ADHD is the most common neurobehavioral disorder in children, occurring in about 8 percent of children and youth. Get more pediatrics news here.

Women Who Smoke May Hit Menopause Sooner

A new study in the journal Menopause finds that women who smoke may start menopause a least a year sooner than women who don’t smoke. The study also found that smoking may impact the risk of developing heart and bone diseases. Read more on tobacco here.

National Health Service Corps Nearly Triples in Size

The National Health Services Corps, established in 1972, has almost tripled in size since 2008, according to the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. The corps is administered by the Health Resources and Services Administration and provides financial, professional and educational resources to medical, dental, and mental and behavioral health care providers who work in communities with limited access to health care. More than ten million patients are cared for in the program, up three million from 2008.

NIH Awards Grants for New Broad Spectrum Drugs under Preparedness Program

The National Institutes of Health has awarded contracts to four companies to develop broad-spectrum therapeutics — antibiotics, antivirals and an antitoxin — to prevent or treat diseases caused by multiple types of bacteria or viruses. The goal of the program, according to the NIH, is to develop products that the U.S. government can stockpile to protect the public in the event of a bioterror attack or public health crisis. Get more preparedness updates here.

Tags: Access to Health Care, News roundups, Pediatrics, Preparedness, Public and Community Health, Tobacco