Category Archives: Prescription drugs

Sep 18 2013
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ASTHO Annual Meeting: NewPublicHealth Q&A with Terry Cline, PHD, Health Commissioner of Oklahoma

Terry Cline, PhD Terry Cline, PhD

For the last several years, each incoming president of the Association of State and Territorial Health Officials (ASTHO) has introduced a President’s Challenge for the year of their presidency to focus attention on a critical national health issue. Previous challenges have included injury prevention, health equity and reducing the number of preterm births. This year, incoming ASTHO president Terry Cline, PhD, will focus his President’s Challenge on prescription drug abuse, a national public health crisis that results in tens of thousands of deaths each year.

>>Follow our ASTHO Annual Meeting coverage throughout the week.

Just before the ASTHO annual meeting began, NewPublicHealth spoke with Cline about the scope of the issue and steps Cline will introduce to help health officers collectively focus their attention on reducing this public health crisis.

NPH: Why have you chosen prescription drug abuse as your President’s Challenge?

Terry Cline: If you look at the trend lines in the United States, we’ve seen a very rapid increase in the number of deaths from the misuse of prescription drugs. We’ve also seen a huge increase in the number of children born with neonatal abstinence syndrome, which has actually tripled in the last decade. Prescription drug abuse has created an incredible burden on the health of people in the United States. Deaths are just one indicator; others include lost productivity, absenteeism and health care costs. Just using neonatal abstinence syndrome as an example, in 2000 the total hospital charges were about $190 million and in 2009, which is the last year we have that data, it was $720 million. Because in many states Medicaid pays for a large percentage of the births, in 2000 that amount was about $130 million out of the $190 million, and in 2009 it was $560 million of the $720 million. So that is becoming a larger and larger financial burden on states as well, and that does not include the long-term effects on babies.

The President’s Challenge will be looking at the absolute number—bringing down the number of deaths, which stand at more than 16,000 deaths per year. We’ve seen opioid deaths increase and continue every year over the last decade. And in most states now, the number of deaths from prescription drugs is actually greater than the number of deaths from automobile accidents, which has steadily gone down over the last decade. So, one is an example of a public health success; the decrease in motor vehicle deaths stems from a comprehensive approach and work with multiple sectors to bring that death rate down. The other, prescription drug deaths, is an alarming increase. My hope is that with the President’s Challenge, we can really increase awareness and leverage public health agencies across the country to mobilize around this issue.

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Jul 2 2013
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Preventing Drug Overdoses: A Look at Data, Laws and Policies

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While men are more likely to die of a prescription painkiller overdose, since 1999 the percentage increase in deaths has been greater among women than among men, according to the Vital Signs monthly health indicator report released today by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). The increase in deaths between 1999 and 2010 has been 400 percent in women compared to 265 percent in men, according to the new report. The overdoses killed nearly 48,000 women during that time period.

“Prescription painkiller deaths have skyrocketed in women…” says CDC Director Tom Frieden, MD, MPH. “Stopping this epidemic in women – and men – is everyone’s business. Doctors need to be cautious about prescribing and patients about using these drugs.”

Key findings include:

  • About 42 women die every day from a drug overdose.
  • Since 2007, more women have died from drug overdoses than from motor vehicle crashes.
  • Drug overdose suicide deaths accounted for 34 percent of all suicides among women compared with 8 percent among men in 2010.
  • More than 940,000 women were seen in emergency departments for drug misuse or abuse in 2010. 

For the Vital Signs report, CDC analyzed data from the National Vital Statistics System (1999-2010) and the Drug Abuse Warning Network public use file (2004-2010).

According to the CDC, studies have shown that women may become dependent on prescription painkillers more quickly than men and may be more likely than men to engage in “doctor shopping” (obtaining prescriptions from multiple prescribers).

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