Category Archives: Substance abuse treatment

Oct 1 2014
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Getting More Funding Mental Health Preventive Services and Treatment: Q&A with Mary Giliberti, NAMI

NPH Q&A Image for Mary Giliberti

The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services last week announced grants totaling almost $100 million aimed specifically at mental health services for young adults. The grants will go to several organizations—including those that work with at-risk kids—within schools and in communities to reduce gun violence.

New private funds have also emerged. For example, in November the National Alliance on Mental Illness (NAMI) will announce the winners of the Connect 4 Mental Health Community Innovations Awards they launched last year along with the National Council for Behavioral Health and several pharmaceutical companies. Applications for the awards close October 3. The goal of the competition is to increase awareness of successful mental health treatment models that can be replicated in other parts of the country.

Recently, NewPublicHealth spoke with NAMI Executive Director Mary Giliberti, JD, about improvements in U.S. mental health care, issues that still need to be addressed and how the work of the award winners can help improve mental health care treatment.

NewPublicHealth: What progress do you point to with respect to treating mental health in the United States and what still needs work?

Mary Giliberti: In terms of progress, I think there is some increased recognition of mental health and substance use conditions as real health conditions, and the need for mental health to be addressed as part of the overall health care system. That includes federal parity requirements in health insurance—including plans offered through state health insurance marketplaces, Medicaid expansion plans and in private insurance—and efforts to coordinate mental health and physical health care, such as incentives and expectations outlined in the Affordable Care Act (ACA). Some examples of this include:

  • Incentives for community mental health centers to improve capacity to treat individuals in their care holistically and via integrated care. This latter point is being supported through the distribution of demonstration grants offered as part of the ACA.
  • Creative use of technologies, including tele-mental health and future potential through health information technology innovations.
  • The evidence of some communities working hard to align and better coordinate systems, including criminal justice solutions.

Other examples of progress include continued development of community-based services, such as adding peers and families as part of the treatment system. 

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Jan 21 2014
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Recommended Reading: How Can Communities Educate Teens About Drug Abuse?

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Many teens are unaware of how drug abuse can negatively affect their lives. The Fourth Annual National Drug Facts Week, which runs Jan. 27 to Feb. 2, is an initiative of the National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA) that aims to change that. The week-long health observance arms communities with the materials and tools they need to debunk myths and educate teens about drug abuse.

Featured in a piece on Reclaiming Futures’ website, NIDA Public Affairs Officer Brian Marquis highlights the science-based information NIDA has provided to teachers, counselors, social workers and community members, as well as the teen-focused events that community leaders are hosting across the country to communicate with young adults about the dangers of drug abuse. Reclaiming Futures, a program funded by the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, helps young people in trouble with drugs, alcohol and crime by reinventing the way police, courts, detention facilities, treatment providers and communities work together to meet this urgent need. 

“Using ideas and resources provided by NIDA, there is a way for everyone to learn the facts and help shatter myths about drug abuse during National Drug Facts Week and beyond,” Marquis wrote in his post.

Spurred by new recommendations from the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation’s Commission to Build a Healthier America, NIDA is encouraging communities to use its resources to improve the nation’s health by investing in children.

Learn more about National Drug Facts Week events across the country.

Oct 22 2013
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Recommended Reading: Painkiller Addiction and America’s Veterans

CIR's "Veteran Affairs: Painkillers" Interactive CIR's "Veteran Affairs: Painkillers" Interactive

In 2008, the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) sent Army paratrooper Jeffrey Waggoner to an Oregon hospital to recover from an addiction to painkillers. However, once there they instead gave him a steady stream of medications, eventually releasing him for a weekend with 19 prescription drugs in hand. He was found dead of an overdose three hours later.

“As a parent, you’d want to know how this happened to your child,” said his father, Greg Waggoner, according to a new report from The Center for Investigative Reporting (CIR). “You send your child to a hospital to get well, not to die.”

In its investigation, CIR found that, post 9/11, the VA has increasingly been treating addictions with a variety of drugs, “feeding addictions and contributing to a fatal overdose rate among VA patients that is nearly double the national average.” Over the past dozen years, prescriptions for the four opiates hydrocodone, oxycodone, methadone and morphine have increased by 270 percent.

Waggoner’s weekend leave medications included 12 oxycodone pills.

As part of its investigation, CIR has created a comprehensive interactive tool that shows the VA systems with the highest prescription rates and allows users to search for information by region and system. The data is culled from CIR’s own research, as well as information from the VA and the U.S. Census Bureau.

Trust for America’s Health also recently released an interactive tool on the growing public health issue of prescription drug abuse—about 6.1 million Americans use or abuse prescription drugs. The tool allows users to search state-by-state prescription drug overdose death rates and find out how each scores on 10 key steps to curb abuse.

>>Read The Center for Investigative Reporting’s “VA’s opiate overload feeds veterans’ addictions, overdose deaths

>>Read NewPublicHealth’s story, “New Report: Most States Not Implementing Enough Proven Strategies to Prevent Prescription Drug Abuse

Oct 17 2013
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Faces of Public Health: Q&A with Lori Butterfield

Lori Butterfield, writer and producer of 'Lipstick & Liquor' Lori Butterfield, writer and producer of 'Lipstick & Liquor'

Lipstick & Liquor, a recently released documentary, takes a close-up look at a secret that is killing women and harming their families. Excessive alcohol use is the third leading cause of preventable death among women between the ages of 35 and 55. Excessive drinking among women is also a contributing factor in one-third of suicides, one-fourth of accidental deaths and one-half of traffic deaths. Significantly, drinking is more likely to reach advanced stages before it is discovered.

The film, which will launch on iTunes and Amazon.com in December, shares the stories of four women and their struggles with alcoholism. The goal of the film, says Lori Butterfield, the film’s writer and producer as well as a senior vice president of creative content for Home Front Communications, is to help women everywhere shake off the stigma associated with women alcoholics, and to provide understanding and insight into the struggle to stay sober. The documentary includes expert commentary from medical researchers, addiction specialists and authors who shed light on the conditions impacting the increase in alcohol use and abuse among American women.

NewPublicHealth recently spoke with Lori Butterfield about the film.

NPH: How did the documentary come about?

Lori Butterfield: My interest in raising awareness began with a story about a woman named Diane Schuler. In the summer of 2009, Diane made headlines after killing herself and seven other people while driving the wrong way on the Taconic Parkway in Westchester County, New York. The toxicology report showed that Diane had been drinking and yet her husband and other family members came out very publicly and said, “Oh she would never do that, she was a wonderful mother, she was a perfect wife.” And I remember thinking at the time, how could someone hide their alcoholism so well that their own family had no idea? That story really stuck with me.

Then, in November of that year, I was overseeing a video project for an Ad Council campaign about “Buzzed driving” [see recent Buzzed Driving campaigns from the Ad Council]. That’s when I read a very startling statistic. It said the number of DUI arrests for women had shot up more than 30 percent in the last decade while the rate for men was actually going down. And I also read that binge drinking for women was on the rise, so something was happening, but I wasn’t quite connecting the dots.

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