Category Archives: Public health schools

Dec 3 2013
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Faces of Public Health: Julio Frenk, Harvard School of Public Health

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Several weeks ago, the Harvard School of Public Health celebrated its Centennial with fanfare, fundraising and a panel discussion featuring world health leaders who are graduates of the school. Following the centennial, NewPublicHealth spoke with the School’s Dean, Julio Frenk, MD, MPH, PHD, who has a joint appointment at the Harvard Kennedy School of Government. He is also a former health minister of Mexico and a former senior fellow in the global health program of the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation.

NewPublicHealth: What do you think have been the key changes in public health efforts since the Harvard School of Public Health was founded 100 years ago?

Julio Frenk: The 100 years that have passed since the School of Public Health was founded are not just any 100 years—they’re the 100 years with the most intense transformations in health in human history. We have seen a more than doubling of life expectancy since the school was founded. Around 1900, the global average for life expectancy was 30 years. At the end of the century, the global average was about 65 years. It more than doubled in the 20th century, and that increase has continued with some setbacks, most notably the AIDS epidemic in Saharan Africa. And we have had a qualitative shift not just in the level of mortality, but in the causes of death. So we went from a preponderance of acute infections to now a predominance of mostly chronic non-communicable diseases, and that’s an incredible transition.

A critical change is that the experience of illness became very different starting from the beginning of the 20th century. Before then, illness was mostly a succession of acute episodes, from which one either recovered or died. If you recovered, you went on to get your next acute illness. Now, illness is more a condition of living. People live with cancer. People live with AIDS. So that’s a big transformation of the patterns of health, disease and death.

Another big change is the emergence of complex health systems, and that’s—again—a process that started at the beginning of the 20th century. Before the 20th century, the social function of the sick was mostly trusted to undifferentiated institutions, such as the family or religious institutions, and it’s not until the 20th century when you see this incredible explosion of specialized institutions and specialized human resources, doctors, nurses and other health professionals. In the 20th century, healthcare is 10 percent of the global economy and employs millions of people, including eight million doctors. These are all profound transformations.

NPH: How has the training of students of public health changed in the last 100 years?

Frenk: There has been profound change. What happened at the beginning of the 20th century was the emergence of public health as a field of action. The practices of engineering emerged in Europe, especially with the rapid urbanization there starting around the 17th century, but then greatly expanded in the 18th century. Engineering allowed for access to clean water and taking care of waste, which resulted in some diseases coming under control. In the 19th century the discovery of microbiology gave rise to the abolishment of the germs as causes of illness. That is the junction that gives birth to public health, along with the idea of social policy, of social activism that actually changed social conditions. It’s in that mix that public health gets shaped.

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Nov 11 2013
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What's New in Schools and Programs of Public Health? Q&A with Harrison Spencer

file Harrison Spencer, Association of Schools and Programs of Public Health (image courtesy of Tulane University)

The Association of Schools and Programs of Public Health (ASPPH), like the American Public Health Association, held its annual meeting in Boston last week. NewPublicHealth spoke with Harrison Spencer, MD, MPH, executive director of the ASPPH, from Boston about the meeting and what’s ahead for students of public health.

NewPublicHealth: How was the meeting and what were some of the key sessions?

Harrison Spencer: Our meeting this year was the first one held since we formed our new organization, the Association of Schools and Programs of Public Health, on August 1. The new organization is now comprised of all accredited public health academic institutions, both schools and programs. We’ve got 93 members now, an increase from 57 members before, so this was a wonderful and exciting and dynamic annual meeting with lots of energy and lots of promise.

Among the highlights were Harvey Fineberg, MD, PhD, president of the Institute of Medicine, who gave us an inspirational talk about public health leadership, and Laura Liswood, Secretary General of the Council of Women World Leaders, who led a discussion on diversity as a way to make organizations and institutes stronger.   

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Nov 1 2013
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Happy 100th, Harvard School of Public Health

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The celebrations earlier this month for the Harvard School of Public Health’s centennial included galas, world leaders and a $450 million fundraising campaign, about a third of which is already completed.

But the most poignant moments may have been watching former graduates, many who are now in key health leadership positions across the globe, in quiet conversations with current students, answering questions about how to get the most out of their time in Boston to help improve population health when they hit the field. Kelechi Ohiri, MD, senior adviser to the Nigerian Ministry of Health, who got his Harvard Master of Public Health eleven years ago, sat out some of the formal Centennial lunch to speak to a current student from his country whose excitement at meeting Nigeria’s top health official bubbled over.

“Meeting him makes me believe I’ll be able to use what I’m learning to help make a difference at home,” she said.

Ohiri said that a critical focus should be “networking to improve skills and create contacts,” which he said is often underutilized by students of public health, and contrasted that with networking as an “explicit goal” of the Harvard MBA program.

Several graduates who are now world health leaders convened for a panel discussion moderated by Institute of Medicine President Harvey Fineberg (who received all his degrees, including his MD, from Harvard) about their experiences in the field of public health. In addition to Ohiri, participants included:

  • Gro Harlem Brundtland, MPH ’65, the former Prime Minister of Norway and former Director-General of the World Health Organization
  • Suraya Dalil, MD, MPH ’05, the Minister of Public Health of Afghanistan
  • Howard Koh, MD, a former professor at the Harvard School of Public Health and currently the U.S. Assistant Secretary for Health
  • Pradit Sintavanarong, MD, MPH ’89, the Minister of Public Health of Thailan

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Sep 19 2013
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Public Health Gets on the Pinterest Bandwagon

Public health institutions across the country are joining the 10.5 million users on the virtual pinboard website, Pinterest, to share important health information and images. Topics such as women’s health, healthy living, emergency preparedness and public health history are a few of the boards on the CDCgov page. Harvard School of Public Health focuses more on healthy eating, recommended readings and inspirational quotes. Users are able to categorize topics and pictures anyway they want, allowing every institute’s page to be unique.

Users of the online scrapbook view content, “re-pin” photos to their pages, add comments to images and “like” user’s content.  Pages encourage users to leave comments on the images that they like most or would like to see more of. Pinterest is the third-fastest growing social network, with 80 percent of users being women and 50 percent mothers, according to TechCrunch. The site is another way for public health professionals to stay at the center of the public health conversation and interact with their key audience on the most recent public health issues. The dissemination of information continues to grow as more people participate in the sorting, collecting and sharing of public health information.

Take a look at some of the other public health institutions that are joining Pinterest: American Public Health Association (APHA)Ohio State's College of Public Health and Association of Public Health Laboratories (APHL).

Jun 27 2013
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Free the Data

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A major theme at this year’s AcademyHealth Annual Research Meeting was the need to become more aggressive on translating and disseminating health research. Just last month, the Mailman School of Public Health at Columbia University announced that is was becoming the first school at the university and one of the first of U.S. schools of public health to adopt an open access resolution. The resolution calls for faculty and other researchers at the school to post their papers in openly available online repositories such as Columbia’s Academic Commons, where content is available free to the public, or in another open access repository, such as the National Institutes of Health’s PubMed Central.

“A wider dissemination of research and information has been a number one priority of our faculty, who are motivated by the belief that scientific knowledge belongs to everyone,” said Linda P. Fried, MD, MP, the dean at Mailman. “It is in the interest of all of us to take every measure possible to improve and simplify the process of gaining access to our research findings,” Fried said.

NewPublicHealth spoke with Bhaven N. Sampat, PhD, Assistant Professor of health policy and management at Mailman and a lead faculty member on the open access endeavor.

NewPublicHealth: Why haven’t many journals been open access before and what is making researchers, particularly in the field of public health, interested in more widely disseminating their research?

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Mar 7 2013
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Death and Public Health

“Death is an inevitable part of life. But death from preventable causes like cervical cancer, early heart disease, or gun violence is a tragedy. Whether expressed in dry, cold numbers or by the images of first graders smiling at the camera for their school picture, these tragedies will continue to motivate us to use both left-brain science and right-brain passion to improve human health and prevent unnecessary death.”

That paragraph is from the foreword by Michael Klag, MD, MPH, dean of the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health (JHSPH) in the current issue of the school’s magazine. The issue is devoted to how public health researchers and practitioners probe, investigate, understand and fight death.

The full issue is well worth reading. A few notable pieces include: 

  • An interview with Vladimir Canuda Romo, PhD, a demographer and assistant professor at the school who says his research shows American life expectancy is on the rise.
  • A critical article on making palliative care  a public health issue.
  • A summary of a recent forum at the school on dealing with gun violence.
  • A piece on prescription drug abuse, which the author calls the “biggest public health issue you’ve never heard of."

Perhaps most poignant are a collection of essays by JHSPH alumni including a thoughtful look at the last minutes of a deer.

>>Bonus Link: In a new book, Happier Endings , Erica Brown, PhD, the scholar in residence at the Jewish Federation of Greater Washington, tells her readers: “we are all going to die, but some of us will die better.” The book, which Dr. Brown calls “a meditation on life and death,” looks at the deaths of several people and shares intimate details of last months, last weeks, last seconds—sometimes peaceful, sometimes not. It’s an important reminder that communities and populations, the building blocks of public health, are made up of individuals who are loved, and missed when they pass away, and that death is indeed a public health issue worth attention.   

Jan 8 2013
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Impact of Hurricane Sandy: NewPublicHealth Q&A with Irwin Redlener

Irwin Redlener Irwin Redlener, New York State Ready Commission and Columbia University National Center for Disaster Preparedness

Just several weeks after Hurricane Sandy hit the New York City area, New York State Governor Andrew Cuomo appointed Irwin Redlener, MD, director of the National Center for Disaster Preparedness at Columbia University’s Mailman School of Public Health, to co-chair the New York State Ready Commission. The role of the Commission is to determine ways to ensure that critical systems and services are in place to respond to future natural disasters and other emergencies.

The specific areas for which the commission was asked to make recommendations include:

  • Addressing vulnerabilities in the state’s health care, energy, transportation, communications and other systems
  • Ensuring that new, modified and existing construction is resilient
  • Ensuring the availability of adequate equipment, fuel, food, water and other emergency supplies
  • Ensuring that first responders and other critical personnel are able to communicate efficiently and have access to adequate resources
  • Ensuring the availability of reliable real-time information for decision-makers
  • Ensuring that lines of authority are clear and officials have the authority to react rapidly to emergency situations

Both the Ready Commission and the 2100 Commission, which was tasked with finding ways to improve the resilience and strength of the state’s infrastructure in the face of natural disasters and other emergencies, submitted their reports to the governor earlier this week. Recommendations of the Ready Commission included:

  • Create a statewide network of unified emergency training, coordination, protocols and communication
  • Update the New York State Building Code
  • Expand use of Vulnerable Populations Databases so first responders; outreach workers; and health care and human services personnel can find and serve those who may need assistance
  • Require that gas stations in strategic locations have access to onsite back-up power capacity

NewPublicHealth spoke with Dr. Redlener about the Commission and the storm’s impact on New York residents.

>>Read about the 2012 edition of its Ready or Not? report from Trust for America’s Health, which looks at strengths and vulnerabilities in each state’s emergency preparedness status.

NewPublicHealth: You were appointed to co-chair the Ready Commission by Governor Cuomo in November. What is the specific focus of the Commission?

Redlener: What we are going to do is assess the current resilience of the city in terms of its preparedness efforts. Are we ready? Are we prepared? What are the missing elements right now in trying to make us more prepared for the next events than we were for this one? Some of this is not all that complicated and unfortunately these are problems that we have seen in prior disasters. Some of the things that we are seeing here were basically exactly what we saw in the Gulf and in New Orleans after Katrina. It isn’t like we haven’t been thinking about these things. I think that is why we were able to provide some reasonable recommendations, because these are not altogether new problems or challenges.

NPH: How strong is disaster preparedness training at schools of public health and within governmental public health?

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Jan 2 2013
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New Year, New Plan for Health

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Yes, today is Wednesday. But as a new year dawns and New Year's resolutions kick in (learning Zumba and building yoga into our weekly schedule are high on the list for NewPublicHealth staffers) let's call today an honorary Monday—a day to embrace a new plan for health.  The Monday Campaigns are here to help.

With the slogan "The day all health breaks loose," Monday Campaigns are a public health initiative of the Columbia University Mailman School of Public Health, the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health and the Lerner Center for Public Health Promotion at Syracuse University. The goal is to help prevent chronic disease by offering a weekly prompt that can support people in starting and sustaining healthy behaviors.

Why Monday?

Research at Johns Hopkins found that a week is a critical unit of time in planning lives and Monday has special significance as the beginning of the week. People view Monday as a day for a fresh start and a chance to set healthy intentions for the next 6 days. They’re more likely to start diets, exercise regimes, quit smoking and schedule doctor’s appointments on Monday than any other day. And, according to the Hopkins researchers, they’re looking for help in setting and carrying out their healthy intentions for the week.

The campaigns have grown to include government and non-profit organizations, businesses, media outlets and communities. The three schools provide research, case studies, health-related content, marketing concepts and programs ready for individuals, communities and public health departments. Specific campaigns include:

The 2013 campaigns began last Monday, with a weekly series that offers tips for 2013. First up: set some long and short term goals:

A long-term goal can be something to work towards, like getting 2 ½ hours of activity each week or eating 5 servings of produce each day. Short-term goals are the smaller actions you take to build up to your objective.  

>>Weigh in: Which Monday campaigns will your community try this year?

Sep 27 2012
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Public Health in Pictures

NewPublicHealth recently made its first foray into infographics with "Better Education=Healthier Lives," a visual exploration of the relationship between education and health. We plan to continue this infographic series with visuals exploring how other aspects of where we live, learn, work and play can affect the health of our communities.

In the meantime, we've been seeing public health infographics everywhere! Take a look at the repost of an interesting graphic below titled, "The World of Public Health," created by an Online MPH Degree site (tip of the hat to GovLoop, where we discovered the graphic). The infographic explores the wide-ranging impact of public health, and showcases both incredible successes as well as formiddable barriers. It also paints a picture of job and education prospects in public health.

The Harvard School of Public Health also released a graphic on, "The Dollars and Sense of Chronic Disease," which shows the economic and health toll of chronic disease.

>>WEIGH IN: Share your favorite public health infographics in the comments below.

Infographic from MPHProgramsList.com Infographic from MPHProgramsList.com
Aug 20 2012
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Kevin Xu: Future of Public Health

Kevin Xu, Journal of Global Health Kevin Xu, Journal of Global Health

Former Young Epidemiology Scholar (YES) Kevin Xu, 20, a junior majoring in biology and sociology with Columbia College at Columbia University in New York City, recently became the editor in chief of the Journal of Global Health,a journal he helped found last yearXu says he sees the journal becoming “an indispensable medium that features the work of student researchers and activists from across the globe, each examining public health problems in his or her own community.” Adds Xu: “We hope to harness the untapped power of students, build upon each other’s contri­butions, and synergize solutions that are local in approach but redefine ‘global’ in their impact.”

YES was launched in 2003 by the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation and the College Board to encourage high school students nationwide to apply epidemiological methods to the investigation of public health issues and inspire the brightest young minds to enter the field of public health. Over the course of eight years, nearly 5,000 students from all 50 states participated in the competition, which awarded $3.7 million in college scholarships to 976 students before the final competition in 2011.

As part of a new series exploring the future of public health in conversations with public health students and emerging leadersNewPublicHealth spoke with Kevin Xu about the journal and about the potential impact of today’s undergraduate and graduate students in improving population health in the United States and around the globe.

NewPublicHealth: How was the Journal of Global Health started?

Journal of Global Health

Kevin Xu: The journal was started by me and another student, Ryan Gallagher, who recently graduated Columbia. But a lot of our recent growth and initiatives have been fueled by me and several other alumni of the Young Epidemiology Scholars Program.

NPH: Why is this journal needed?

Kevin Xu: There’s been a tremendous rise in the popularity of public health, global health and epidemiology as fields of study for undergraduates and high school students, and this has contributed to a huge amount of research and field work and activism that’s largely driven by undergraduates in colleges not only in the U.S. but also worldwide. The challenge for any student who is doing research or activist work or field work in public health, global health or epidemiology is translating their research or their work into social change and into policy change. We feel that it’s really important to provide a boom box of sorts for students who are doing work in public health to provide a medium to spur productive exchange among undergraduates and to amplify the voices of undergraduates who are interested in public health. We also want to show the very practical side of public health research and show how accessible it is. We think public health is something that students really can access and use as a tool to make a difference to their communities.

NPH: You started as a print journal but have expanded the project in just a short time.

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