Category Archives: Public health

Jun 27 2014
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Public Health News Roundup: June 27

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FDA Approves for Marketing a Motorized Walking Suit for People with Spinal Cord Injuries
The U.S. Food and Drug Administration has approved for marketing a device called the ReWalk, which is the first motorized device intended to act as an exoskeleton for people with lower body paralysis from a spinal cord injury. According to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, there are about 200,000 people in the United States living with a spinal cord injury. ReWalk consists of a fitted, metal brace that supports the legs and part of the upper body; motors that supply movement at the hips, knees and ankles; a tilt sensor; and a backpack that contains the computer and power supply. Crutches provide the user with additional stability when walking, standing and rising up from a chair. Using a wireless remote control worn on the wrist, the user commands ReWalk to stand up, sit down or walk. Read more on disability.

One in 10 Deaths Among Working-Age Adults is Due to Excessive Drinking
Excessive alcohol use accounts for one in 10 deaths among working-age adults ages 20-64 years in the United States, according to a report from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and published in Preventing Chronic Disease. Excessive alcohol use led to approximately 88,000 deaths per year from 2006 to 2010, and shortened the lives of those who died by about 30 years. The deaths were due to health effects from drinking too much over time, such as breast cancer, liver disease and heart disease; and health effects from drinking too much in a short period of time, such as violence, alcohol poisoning and motor vehicle crashes. In total, there were 2.5 million years of potential life lost each year due to excessive alcohol use. Nearly 70 percent of deaths due to excessive drinking involved working-age adults, and about 70 percent of the deaths involved males. About 5 percent of the deaths involved people under age 21. The highest death rate due to excessive drinking was in New Mexico (51 deaths per 100,000 population) and the lowest was in New Jersey (19.1 per 100,000). Read more on substance abuse.

Men and Women Use Mental Health Services Differently
Women with chronic physical illnesses are more likely to use mental health services than men with similar illnesses, and they also seek out mental health services six months earlier than those same men, according to new study from St. Michael's Hospital in Toronto, Canada and published in the Journal of Epidemiology & Community Health. The study looked at people diagnosed with at least one of four physical illnesses: Diabetes, high blood pressure, asthma or chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. The researchers found that among those with at least one of these four illnesses, women were 10 percent more likely to use mental health services than men, and within any three-year period women with physical illness used medical services for mental health treatment six months earlier than men. The researchers say the results may imply that women are more comfortable than men with seeking mental health support; that symptoms are worse among women, requiring more women to seek help and sooner; or that men defer seeking treatment for mental health concerns. Read more on mental health.

Jun 26 2014
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Public Health News Roundup: June 26

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‘I Got Tested’ Campaign Promotes Importance of Knowing Your HIV Status
A new public information campaign from Greater Than AIDS is using real-life stories to advocate the importance of knowing your HIV/AIDS status. The “I Got Tested” campaign will place materials in clinics to support providers in HIV outreach; provide free HIV testing in select Walgreens pharmacies; and promote hotlines and online resources provided by departments of health and agencies, as well as the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. “Despite overwhelming evidence that early diagnosis and treatment play an important role both in the health of those who are positive and in reducing the spread of HIV, many Americans at highest risk for infection still have not been tested,” said Tina Hoff, Senior Vice President and Director of Health Communication and Media Partnerships at the Kaiser Family Foundation, a co-founding partner of Greater Than AIDS, in a release. “This campaign is about helping to reduce the stigma surrounding HIV testing, to encourage patients to ask their providers to get tested, and to connect people with services in their communities.” Read more on HIV/AIDS.

Court: NYC’s ‘Soda Ban’ is Illegal
New York City’s ban on large sugary drinks—often referred to as former Mayor Michael Bloomberg’s “soda ban”—is illegal, according to a 4-2 ruling from the state Court of Appeals. The court found that the local health board that passed the regulation overstepped its authority. "By choosing among competing policy goals, without any legislative delegation or guidance, the Board engaged in law-making and thus infringed upon the legislative jurisdiction of the City Council of New York," wrote Judge Eugene Pigott for the majority. The soda ban was one of several public health initiatives pushed by Bloomberg, along with a ban on cigarettes in certain public spaces and a ban on trans fats from restaurants. Read more on nutrition.

Study: 3 Hours of Television Per Day Can Double Risk of Early Death
Watching more than three hours of television per day may double a person’s risk of an early death, compared to someone who watches less than one hour per day, according to a surprising new study in the Journal of the American Heart Association. Researchers tracked more than 13,000 seemingly healthy adults in Spain, finding that for every two additional hours a person spent watching television, their risk of death from heart disease climbed 44 percent, their cancer death risk climbed 21 percent and their risk of premature death climbed 55 percent for all other causes. The study found no such link for other sedentary causes, including working at a computer and driving. Read more on physical activity.

Jun 25 2014
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Bringing a Business Lens to Healthcare — Spotlight: Health Q&A with Toby Cosgrove, Cleveland Clinic

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Toby Cosgrove, MD, CEO of the Cleveland Clinic, spoke about bringing a business lens to health during a panel discussion this morning at the Spotlight: Health expansion program of the Aspen Ideas Festival. In an article in this month’s Harvard Business Review, he wrote that “Fixing health care will require a radical transformation, moving from a system organized around individual physicians to a team-based approach focused on patients.”

NewPublicHealth spoke to Cosgrove about this transformation just before the Spotlight: Health conference.

file Toby Cosgrove, MD, CEO of the Cleveland Clinic

Toby Cosgrove: The first thing we did is that for the last decade we’ve been very transparent around our quality, and we’ve released books on quality outcomes which are available both in paperback form and on our website. The second thing that we’ve done is we’ve consolidated services. For example, we started out having six hospitals in the system that provided obstetrics care, and now we’ve got three and are about to have two. And each time we’ve consolidated we’ve increased the volume of patients and improved the quality. We’ve done consolidations with pediatrics, cardiac surgery, rehabilitation, psychiatry, trauma and obstetrics. We think that it’s called the practice of medicine—the more you practice at it, the better you get at it, and every time we’ve done that we’ve seen that happen.

In Cleveland, for example, we partnered with Metro Health, a large network of health providers. We previously had five trauma centers in Cleveland. Now we have three and as we’ve done that, the mortality rate has improved 20 percent. So there are real activities that have begun to drive the business approach.

NPH: What are other ways that the Cleveland Clinic has been able to respond to consumer needs using a business model?

Cosgrove: We think you’ve got to do three things. You’ve got to have improved access, quality and affordability. The access is not just having insurance—the access is actually getting to see a provider, and last year we provided about one million same-day appointments in addition to our scheduled ones. We also took our emergency room wait times from 43 minutes to 11 by changing the system that we use. And in our call center we’ve reduced the number of dropped calls and improved the speed of answers. All of that is aimed at giving patients access to the caregivers. We also reorganized our internal system so that when you, say, have a neurologic problem, instead of coming to see a neurologist and then a neurosurgeon, you come into the neurologic institute where you can be seen in one location under one leadership of neurology, neurosurgery and psychiatry, so that you are seamlessly seen with all the specialties right there in one location. 

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Jun 25 2014
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Public Health News Roundup: June 25

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HHS’ Million Hearts Initiative Launches Health Eating Resource Center
The Million Hearts initiative from the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services has launched a new online resource center to promote healthier eating by individuals and families. The Healthy Eating and Lifestyle Resource Center features lower-sodium, heart-healthy recipes and family-friendly meal plans, and emphasizes managing sodium intake. The searchable recipes include nutritional facts and use everyday ingredients. “This resource helps people see that it’s not about giving up the food you love, but choosing lower sodium options that taste great," said Tom Frieden, MD, Director of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. “Small changes can make a big difference.  We can prevent 11 million cases of high blood pressure each year if everyone reduced their daily sodium intake to 2,300 mg.” The Million Hearts initiative was launched with the goal of preventing 1 million heart attacks and strokes by 2017. Read more on nutrition.

3-D Mammograms Improve Breast Cancer Detection Rate, Reduce Recall Rate
Tomosynthesis—also known as 3-D mammography—can increase the detection rate of breast cancer while also decreasing false positives that can lead to multiple and unnecessary re-tests, according to a new study in the Journal of the American Medical Association. Researchers analyzed the results of 454,850 examinations, finding that when 3-D mammography was combined with traditional digital mammograms the detection rate for breast cancer climbed 40 percent while there was a 15 percent decrease in the recall rate, or the percentage of women who needed additional screening due to inconclusive results. The findings come as more and more hospitals and physicians are turning to 3-D mammography. The researchers cautioned that more study was needed into the relatively new technology. Read more on cancer.

AAP: Reading to Young Kids Starting in Infancy Improves Literacy Later in Life
Read to your kids—aloud and every day—starting as early as their infancy. That’s the latest recommendation from the American Academy of Pediatrics' (AAP) Council on Early Childhood. The policy statement is set to appear in the August print issue of the journal Pediatrics. "This is the first time the AAP has called out literacy promotion as being an essential component of primary care pediatric practice," said statement author Pamela High, MD, director of developmental and behavioral pediatrics at Hasbro Children's Hospital in Providence, R.I., and a professor at Brown University. "Fewer than half of children are being read to every day by their families, and that number hasn't really changed since 2003. It's a public health message to parents of all income groups, that this early shared reading is both fun and rewarding." According to the AAP, reading proficiency in the third grade is the most important predictor of eventual high school graduation, but approximately two-thirds of all U.S. children and 80 percent of kids living in poverty finish third grade lacking in reading proficiency. Reading aloud to a young child can promote literacy while also strengthening family ties. Read more on pediatrics.

Jun 24 2014
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Follow NewPublicHealth this Week for News from ‘Spotlight: Health’ at the Aspen Ideas Festival and the Winners of the RWJF Culture of Health Prize

The Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF) is a lead sponsor for this week’s Spotlight: Health meeting, a two-and-a-half day expansion of the Aspen Ideas Festival, convened annually by the Aspen Institute in Colorado.

Spotlight: Health will bring together world leaders, corporate executives, innovators, entrepreneurs, policy experts, media, philanthropists and thought leaders from many sectors to showcase what health and health care can look like a decade from now.

On Wednesday, RWJF CEO Risa Lavizzo-Mourey will deliver a keynote address: “We Will Have A Powerful Story to Tell: Building a Culture of Health in America,” which will be live-streamed at 10 a.m. (EDT). She will also announce the six winners of the RWJF Culture of Health Prize, which honors communities working at the forefront of health improvement.

NewPublicHealth will live tweet and live blog from the event, as well as post interviews with key thought leaders presenting at the conference. They will include investor/entrepreneur Esther Dyson on “The Way to Wellville,” a wellness competition that’s looking for the key metrics to help improve population health; Cleveland Clinic CEO Toby Cosgrove, MD, on bringing business best practices to health care; and Michael Murphy, of the Boston-based MASS Design Group, on better design ideas for hospitals and health systems.

Follow RWJF and NewPublicHealth coverage of Spotlight: Health using the hashtag #AspenIdeas.

Jun 24 2014
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Public Health News Roundup: June 24

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HUD Releases Progress Report on Rebuilding After Hurricane Sandy
The U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development’s (HUD) Sandy Program Management Office has issued its first report tracking progress on the Sandy Rebuilding Strategy. “While this report shows we are following through on [our rebuilding commitment] we also recognize that many families and business are still on the road to recovery and delays in connecting them to the services and support they need are often too long,” said HUD Secretary Shaun Donovan. “Although more work needs to be done, HUD and the federal government will continue coordinating with local officials until the region has recovered and we meet all the goals of the Sandy Rebuilding Strategy.”

The report tracks progress on several goals set by HUD, including:

  • Promoting resilient rebuilding
  • Restoring and strengthening homes and providing families with safe, affordable housing options
  • Supporting small businesses and revitalizing local economies
  • Addressing insurance challenges and affordability
  • Building state and local capacity to plan for and implement long-term recovery and rebuilding
  • Improving data sharing between federal, state and local officials

Read more on Hurricane Sandy.

New Report Finds Tobacco Companies Have Made Cigarettes Even More Addictive and Deadly
Design changes and chemical additives introduced by tobacco companies in recent decades have made cigarettes more addictive, more attractive to kids and even more deadly, according to a new report, Designed for Addiction, released by the Campaign for Tobacco-Free Kids.

The report finds that tobacco companies have:

  • Made cigarettes more addictive by controlling and increasing nicotine levels and enhancing the impact of nicotine.
  • Made cigarettes more attractive to kids by adding flavorings such as licorice and chocolate that mask the harshness of the smoke, menthol that makes the smoke feel smoother and other chemicals that expand the lungs’ airways and make it easier to inhale.
  • Added ingredients that make cigarettes even more deadly, according to a Surgeon General's report on tobacco and health, released in January which found that smokers today have a much higher risk of lung cancer than smokers in 1964, when the first Surgeon General's report disclosed the harms caused by smoking.

Read more on tobacco.

CDC to Launch Fourth ‘Tips From Former Smokers’ Series
The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) will be launching its next “Tips from Former Smokers” series on July 7. The ads will run nationwide for nine weeks on television, radio and billboards, as well as online, in theaters, in magazines and in newspapers. According to the CDC, the Tips national tobacco education campaign has helped hundreds of thousands of smokers quit since it began in 2012.

“These new ads are powerful. They highlight illnesses and suffering caused by smoking that people don’t commonly associate with cigarette use,” said CDC Director Tom Frieden, MD, MPH. “Smokers have told us these ads help them quit by showing what it’s like to live every day with disability and disfigurement from smoking.”

Smoking remains the leading cause of preventable death and disease in the United States, according to the CDC, and kills about 480,000 Americans each year. More than 16 million Americans are living with a smoking-related disease. For every person who dies from a smoking-related disease, about 30 more people suffer at least one serious illness from smoking.

The most recent “Tips” campaign resulted in more than 100,000 additional calls made to 800-QUIT-NOW. On average, weekly quitline calls were up 80 percent while the ads were on the air, compared to the week before they began running. Read more on tobacco.

Jun 23 2014
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Public Health News Roundup: June 23

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Study: Indoor Cooking Can Lead to Exposure to Dangerous Pollutants
Routine cooking also routinely exposes many Americans to dangerously high levels of pollutants such as carbon monoxide (CO), nitrogen dioxide (NO2) and particulate matter (PM), according to a new study in the journal Environmental Health Perspectives. While the World Health Organization is currently establishing guidelines for indoor air quality, neither the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) nor any other U.S. agency regulate indoor air quality in non-industrial buildings. Researchers determined that during the average winter week approximately 1.7 million Californians could be exposed to excessively high CO levels simply because of cooking on gas stoves without range hoods; 12 million could be exposed to excessive NO2 levels. “That’s a lot of people in California, and those results ballpark-apply across the country,” said Brett Singer, study author and a staff scientist at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL). “The EPA would say we don’t have a carbon monoxide or nitrogen dioxide problem in this country...In reality, we absolutely do have that problem; it’s just happening indoors.” The researchers listed improved ventilation; improved filtration; and improved building codes and standards as ways to combat the public health danger. Read more on air and water quality.

Multiple Errors Behind CDC’s Anthrax Exposure Incident
Multiple protocol breaches at a U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) laboratory led to 84 workers being exposed to live anthrax, including the fact that CDC researchers allowed only 24 hours to kill the pathogens—half the recommended time—according to Reuters. So far no one has died or become ill from the unprecedented U.S. exposure incident, but they are being treated with a vaccine and antibiotics. The errors at the biosafety level 3 facility raise new concerns over lax laboratory oversight. "If the protocol was already there, then there is really no excuse for it," said Amesh Adalja, MD, an infectious disease expert at the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center. "The question goes down to personnel and why wasn't protocol followed.” Read more on infectious disease.

Study: Autism Risk Higher in Children Whose Mothers Lived Near Commercial Pesticides
Pregnant women who live within a mile of places where commercial pesticides area used—including farms, golf courses and other public places—are more likely to have children with an autism spectrum disorder, according to a new study in the journal Environmental Health Perspectives. In a study of approximately 1,000 families, researchers determined that depending on the kinds of chemicals used, proximity to the treated area and when during the pregnancy the mother was exposed, their children were 60 to 200 percent more likely to develop autism; exposure during the third trimester brought the highest risk. Approximately one in every 68 children has autism, according to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Read more on maternal and infant health.

Jun 20 2014
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Public Health News Roundup: June 20

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Depression Linked to Higher Heart Disease Death Risk in Younger Women
Women age 55 and younger are twice as likely to suffer a heart attack, die or require artery-opening procedures if they’re moderately or severely depressed, according to new research in the Journal of the American Heart Association. Investigators assessed depression symptoms in 3,237 women with known or suspected heart disease who were scheduled for coronary angiography, an X-ray that diagnoses disease in the arteries that supply blood to the heart. After nearly three years of follow-up, researchers found:

  • In women 55 and younger, after adjusting for other heart disease risk factors, each 1-point increase in symptoms of depression was associated with a 7 percent increase in the presence of heart disease.
  • In men and older women, symptoms of depression didn’t predict the presence of heart disease.
  • Women 55 and younger were 2.17 times as likely to suffer a heart attack, die of heart disease or require an artery-opening procedure during the follow-up period if they had moderate or severe depression.
  • Women 55 and younger were 2.45 times as likely to die from any cause during the follow-up period if they had moderate or severe depression.

Read more on heart health.

HUD Provides Additional Funds for Hundreds of U.S. Programs for the Homeless
The U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development has announced a second round of grants totaling $140 million to nearly 900 local homeless assistance programs for both permanent and transitional housing programs. The grants will fund programs including 436 new local projects aimed at providing permanent supportive housing for people experiencing chronic homelessness. Read more on housing.

NIH Launches Public Website on 3D Printing
The National Institutes of Health (NIH) has launched the NIH 3D Print Exchange, a public website that lets users share, download and edit 3D print files related to health and science. Among other uses, the files can be used to print custom laboratory equipment, as well as models of bacteria and human anatomy. NIH uses 3D printing—or the creation of a physical object from a digital model—to study viruses; repair and enhance lab apparatus; and help plan medical procedures. The 3D Print Exchange also includes video tutorials; a discussion forum; and tools that convert scientific and clinical data into ready-to-print 3D files. Read more on research.

Jun 19 2014
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Recommended Reading: ‘Strong Mental Health Gives Us Increased Resilience’

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An American Academy of Pediatrics symposium earlier this week focused on ways to prevent “toxic stress” in children and families, including addressing mental health education and treatment early in a child’s life. In a comprehensive interview during May’s Mental Health Awareness Month, David Shern, PhD, senior science advisor at Mental Health America and a member of American Public Health Association’s Mental Health Section, addressed the importance of this approach.

“[W]e can develop strong mental health which gives us increased resilience to deal with the adversities that we experience in life, to concentrate better, to be more productive, to be more emotionally well balanced,” he said. “So it’s important that when we think about the overall health of our population, we think not only about preventing illness, which of course is critically important, but also promoting strength and well being.”

Read the full interview with the American Public Health Association. 

Jun 19 2014
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Public Health News Roundup: June 19

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CDC: Induced Births Down for the First Time in Two Decades
The rate for the induction of labor for single births is down for the first time in two decades, according to data from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. While the decrease is small—down to 23.3 percent in 2012 from 23.7 percent in 2011—it is also positive, as induced labor can increase the risk of cesarean section, neonatal infections and neonatal respiratory complications. Induction rates at 38 weeks were also lower for 36 states and the District of Columbia, ranging from a low of 5 percent to as high as 48 percent. Induced labor for non-medical reasons is not recommended before 39 weeks of gestation. Read more on maternal and infant health.

Study: Antidepressant Warnings Linked to Rise in Teen Suicide Attempts
An effort to improve public safety by warning patients about the potential dangers of antidepressants may have had the unintended consequence of actually increasing teen suicide attempts, according to a new study in the journal BMJ. Researchers determined that antidepressant prescriptions for young people dropped approximately 20 percent after the U.S. Food and Drug Administration’s (FDA) 2003 warning mandate. At the same time, teen suicide attempts climbed nearly 22 percent, with researchers pointing to untreated depression as a likely explanation. "To a certain extent, the FDA's black box warning was legitimate, but the media emphasis was really on suicide without noting the potential risk of undertreatment of depression,” said lead author Christine Lu, an instructor in population medicine at the Harvard Pilgrim Health Care Institute in Boston, according to HealthDay. “Because of that, there has been an overreaction, and that overreaction has sent alarming messages to parents and young people.” Read more on mental health.

FDA: Voluntary Recall of Generic High Blood Pressure Medication
India's Dr Reddy's Laboratories Ltd. has begun a voluntary recall of 13,560 bottles of a high blood pressure drug in the United States. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) announced that the metoprolol succinate—which is a generic form of AstraZeneca Plc's Toprol XL—failed a dissolution test, which calculates how long it takes a drug’s active ingredient to be released into the body. The recall began on May 23. In March, Dr Reddy's recalled nearly 60,000 bottles of a heartburn drug because of microbial contamination. Read more on prescription drugs.