Category Archives: Food access

Mar 11 2014
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Why Chipotle’s Guacamole Scare Really Matters

Lost in the late night guffaws over Chipotle’s report to investors last week that future weather changes could impact the price of avocados—and in turn the availability of guacamole—is that those changes may impact far more than just chips and dips.

The Chipotle annual report told investors that “Increasing weather volatility or other long-term changes in global weather patterns, including any changes associated with global climate change, could have a significant impact on the price or availability of some of our ingredients...[and] we may choose to temporarily suspend serving menu items, such as guacamole or one or more of our salsas...”

The chain’s concern comes from scientists’ predictions for hotter temperatures and less rainfall in upcoming decades, which could reduce the yields of crops such as avocados. But a drop in rainfall impacts so much more than guacamole. Several times this year multiple communities in California, which has faced a severe drought, issued water restrictions as stringent as how frequently people could flush their toilets.

Recently The Atlantic Cities published an online quiz about how much water it takes for common activities such as showers and laundry. The quiz was developed by an Indiana University professor who was surprised by the many wrong answers he got from the thousand people he surveyed.

Do you know how much water it takes to water the lawn? Check out the quiz here.

Mar 3 2014
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Public Health: The Food Issue

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This month the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health published a special issue of its magazine devoted to food. There weren’t any recipes, unless you count “recipes” for a healthier planet, which can be reached by following some of the recommendations in the supplement.

“Changing what we eat is more complex than it sounds,” writes the school’s dean, Michael Klag, MD, MPH. “It involves not just personal choice but also changing methods of food production and delivery systems so that the right choice becomes the default choice. A new ‘Green Revolution’ that relies on sustainable methods of food production will require partnerships of farmers, agronomists, development agencies and policymakers. Interventions to change the norms of what we eat must be culturally appropriate, and take into account the context of nutritional needs within the population. Such interventions will require partners who understand human and plant biology, behavior, economics and policy. This type of multidisciplinary, population-based effort is a centerpiece of public health...”

Key features of the issue include:

Read the Special Food Issue of the Magazine of the Johns Hopkins School of Public Health.

Jan 20 2014
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A Closer Look at California’s Drought

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For now, California’s drought is reported to be the state’s worst in forty years, but climate scientists fear the weeks ahead could see it get even worse.

A map (right inset) produced by scientists at NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center shows how dry California is compared to other states. Climatologists generate groundwater and soil moisture drought indicators each week, based on satellite data and other observations. This map, from January 13, shows the extent of the drought in California, with lighter colors indicating better soil saturation and darker colors indicating very dry land, compared to historical averages.

California’s drought has public health implications for both the state and the rest of the country for several reasons, including the potential for continued fires fueled by dry grass and trees, which pose risks such as fire injuries, smoke inhalation injuries and even death.

There could also be a produce shortage linked to the water crisis. The Associated Press has reported that city water managers in the state say the drought conditions may mean they have, on average, only about 5 percent of the needed water for consumers and farms in California. According to the U.S. Department of Agriculture,  California supplies half of the fruits and vegetables consumed in the United States. Reduced crop sizes can also drive up produce prices because of a lower–than-usual supply and the need for imports, which can be more expensive because of shipping and other fees.

Aug 5 2013
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Breaking Down Barriers for Access to Healthy Food Options

Tackling the problem of obesity in the United States cannot be done with a single step solution. There are many factors that need to be addressed at the family, school and community levels in order for obesity rates to continue to decline across the country. Unfortunately, not everyone has equal access to the education and options that allow us to make healthier food choices. Higher prices and lack of accessibility to fresh produce serve as barriers for lower income communities in the battle against obesity and improving public health.

In urban areas across the country, groups focused on healthy living and eating are working to develop programs to create more healthy options for everyone. Programs in cities such as New York, Los Angeles and Philadelphia—to name just a few—have caught on with local food vendors, store owners, public health departments and the general public as we start to see rates of obesity drop in those targeted areas.

>>Read more about the fight against childhood obesity and the signs of progress in different areas across the country.

We have found some great examples of programs across the country that are proving successful in their attempts to increase the number of healthy options available to at-risk children and the greater community.

  • In New York City, pediatricians at Lincoln Medical Center in the Bronx and Harlem Hospital have started prescribing fruits and vegetables for children. The prescriptions allow them to use coupons for produce at local farmers markets and city green carts. Medical professionals see this as a longer-term solution to the issues they are seeing children come in with, rather than simply prescribing them medicine.
  • With Philadelphia weighing in as the most obese city in the nation, The Food Trust’s Brianna Almaguer Sandoval has enlisted the help of corner store owners to start providing healthier options on their shelves. The Healthy Corner Store Initiative provides store owners with free marketing materials such as labels and recipe cards; trainings on how to select, price and display the healthier offerings; and for some even funding for new shelves and refrigerator cases to help better stock fresh food.
  • Groups in Athens, Ohio, are joining together to host an event called “Bounty on the Bricks,” to raise money to create a new grant program to enhance the capacity for local food pantries to provide more healthy options for their visitors in need. Those who bought tickets to the event will enjoy a meal celebrating local farmers and fresh produce along one of the main streets in Athens. The dinner will be held August 10 and organizers have already surpassed expected ticket sales.
Apr 19 2013
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Sidewalk Spinach: Recommended Reading

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While laws to help make it easier for everyone to get their veggies are cropping up all over, some would-be planters get stopped in their carrot tracks by regulations that prohibit use of public spaces for planting, or even limit what can be grown on private property, according to a recent article in the Wall Street Journal [note: subscription required]. In some jurisdictions, according to the article, sidewalk gardeners have been fined and may lack the clout to advocate for changing the laws.

>>Bonus Link: Read about Urban Farming, a nonprofit group with high-profile corporate sponsors that supports gardens on unused land.

Nov 22 2011
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Health Departments Serve Up Healthy Ideas for Thanksgiving Dinner

Many news reports this week put the calorie counts for Thanksgiving dinner at anywhere from 2,000 to 4,500 calories (likely an extra slice of pie and an extra pour of gravy in the latter count), which is why health departments across the country are offering advice on healthier eating and increased activity come Thursday:

  • Smart Eating Habits from the Washington, D.C., health department include eating breakfast on Thanksgiving Day.

  • Online Thanksgiving cookbook from the San Bernardino County, Calif., health department (the pumpkin bread pudding dessert has only 183 calories and 2 grams of fat per serving).

  • A video on healthy eating tips from the Lake County, Ill., health department (survey the buffet and be a picky eater before filling your plate). [See Lake County's November Nutrition Tip video below.]

  • Safe eating should also be on the menu. The Mayo Clinic offers tips on how long you can safely serve Thanksgiving leftovers.

Nov 8 2011
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Hank Cardello Q&A: Selling Better-for-You Foods is Good Business

Cardello Hank Cardello, Hudson Institute

The Obesity Solutions Initiative at the Hudson Institute, a think tank based in Washington, D.C., has released a new report, Better for You Foods—It’s Just Good Business,” that found food and beverage companies with a higher percentage of their sales coming from better-for-you foods and beverages perform better financially.

Funding for the report was provided by the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation. NewPublicHealth spoke with Hank Cardello, MBA, lead author of the report, director of the Obesity Solutions Initiative and previously a marketing executive for several major food and beverage companies, about the report and its implications.

NewPublicHealth: Tell us about the study findings.

Hank Cardello: We looked at 15 companies, mostly consumer package goods companies and the large beverage companies such as General Mills, Kellogg’s, Coca-Cola and Kraft. These are the companies that are in the top 30 of the largest food companies in the country and also account for about a third of all the grocery sales to consumers. We looked at sales, we looked at their profits, we looked at their reputations, we looked at their shareholder returns and one of the key findings was this: most of the growth in sales (over 70 percent) was coming from better-for-you products. The other interesting finding was that not only was the percentage increase greater but also the absolute dollar sales were greater. A two-to-one ratio of better-for-you growth versus traditional products such as sugared soft drinks, cookies and ice cream.

NPH: And why is this study so important?

Read More

May 13 2011
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A New Online Map to Find - and Fill - Food Deserts

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A new online mapping tool from the U.S. Department of Agriculture is helping identify census tracts within the nation where low-income communities overlap with limited access to a supermarket or large grocery store.

The new tool, called the Food Desert Locator, is an Internet-based mapping tool that directs users to "food deserts" around the country. Food deserts are low-income communities that lack ready access to healthy food.

The tool was developed by the USDA’s Economic Research Service (ERS). The goal of the tool is to help communities expand the availability of healthy food.

"This new Food Desert Locator will help policy makers, community planners, researchers, and other professionals identify communities where public-private intervention can help make fresh, healthy, and affordable food more readily available to residents," said Agriculture Secretary Tom Vilsack.

The map is based on census tracts. According to USDA, about 10 percent of the 65,000 census tracts in the U.S. meet the definition of a food desert. Approximately 13.5 million people live in these census tracts, most in urban areas.

The new mapping tool lets users access a map of the U.S. that highlights and identifies census tracts that qualify as food deserts. Users can scan the map and zoom into an area or use the search feature to find a specific location. They can then create smaller maps showing food desert census tracts and also access statistics on population characteristics of a selected tract, such as the number of households without a car. Not having easy access to transportation can be a factor that can keep households from purchasing healthy foods if neighborhood stores don’t stock them.

Weigh in: Do you live in a "food desert"? Is your community doing anything to change that?