Category Archives: Antibiotic resistance

Sep 22 2014
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Following the Announcement of New Antibiotic Resistance Initiative, Advocates Call for Increased Emphasis on Prevention in Livestock

Despite growing awareness of the dangers, antibiotic resistance continues to sicken two million Americans and kill 23,000 each year, according to a 2013 report from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Late last week the Obama administration announced a series of efforts targeting the public health issue. Among them:

  • A Cabinet-level task force to create a national action plan on  antibiotic resistance
  • Improved federal oversight of antibiotic use in the United States, including better tracking of outbreaks
  • Incentives for developing new generations of antibiotics aimed at treating currently resistant microbes
  • A $20-million prize for the development of a rapid diagnostic laboratory test that doctors can use to identify highly resistant bacterial infections

Many in the public health field are quick to note that more should be done to address a key source of antibiotic resistance—widespread use of antibiotics to prevent infection and promote growth in livestock. There have been concerns that, in addition to over-prescription by physicians overuse, of the antibiotics in farm animals has also contributed to the growing trend of antibiotic resistance. A recent study found that livestock workers can harbor resistant bacteria acquired on the job and introduce it into the community.

Ed Silverman, who writes the Pharmalot blog for the Wall Street Journal, said that an administration report calls for the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA), the U.S. Department of Agriculture, the National Science Foundation and the U.S. Department of Homeland Security to work together to develop an analytic model to assess the relationship between antibiotic use in livestock and the development of antibiotic resistance. The FDA currently has voluntary guidelines for livestock producers on limiting antibiotic use that go into effect in 2016, but advocates had hoped for an actual ban.

APIC ABCs of Infections

>>Bonus Link: The Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology (APIC) has released a useful infographic for public health professionals and physicians to share with consumers about their roles in preventing antibiotic resistance.

Jun 4 2013
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NIH-Funded Research to Explore Intractable Public Health Concerns

New funding by the National Institutes of Health (NIH) is aimed at improving treatment for bacterial infections, treating alcohol dependence and determining effective drugs for long-term diabetes treatment.

  • Antibiotic Resistance: Duke University has been awarded $2 million by the NIH for a clinical research network focused on antibacterial resistance. Funding could rise to close to $70 million by 2019. According to the NIH, bacterial infections resistant to antibiotic drugs were first reported more than 60 years ago and since then have become more common in both health care and community settings. In some cases, no effective antibiotics exist. The funding will be used to conduct clinical trials on new drugs, optimizing use of existing ones; testing diagnostics and conducting research on best practices for infection control.
  • Alcohol Dependence: A new study funded by the NIH and published in the Journal of Addiction Medicine finds that the smoking-cessation drug varenicline (brand name Chantix), significantly reduced alcohol consumption and craving among people who are alcohol-dependent. “Current medications for alcohol dependence are effective for some, but not all, patients. New medications are needed to provide effective therapy to a broader spectrum of alcohol dependent individuals,” said says Kenneth R. Warren, PhD, acting director of the National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism, part of NIH. Participants who took varenicline, compared with those taking a placebo, decreased their heavy drinking days per week by nearly 22 percent.  
  • Diabetes: The NIH is currently recruiting volunteers for a study to compare the long-term benefits and risks of four widely used diabetes drugs in combination with metformin, the most common first-line medication for treating type 2 diabetes. The study is important because if doctors find that metformin is not effective enough to help manage type 2 diabetes, they often add another drug to lower blood glucose levels. However, there have been no long-term studies on which of the add-on drugs are most effective and have fewest side effects. The study will compare drug effects on glucose levels, adverse effects, diabetes complications and quality of life over an average of nearly five years and will enroll about 5,000 patients at 37 study sites.
Apr 30 2013
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Extending the Cure Releases Antibiotic Resistance Research

In recent years many bacteria have become resistant to drugs that commonly vanquished them, depleting a natural resource—antibiotics—that has saved millions of lives around the globe. Using these drugs only when necessary, and using the right drug for the right infection will help ensure that the medications are available and effective when they’re needed.

>>Watch a new, three-minute animated video that tells the story of how antibiotic-resistant “superbug” bacteria have become a serious public health threat that affects everyone. The video frames the problem uniquely: We must treat antibiotics as a natural resource that can be depleted with overuse, just like water, trees, and other resources on which we all depend. The video lays out specific steps that everyone – including doctors, hospitals, and consumers – can take to tackle the problem.

Ramanan Laxminarayan Ramanan Laxminarayan, Extending the Cure

Extending the Cure (ETC), a project of the Center for Disease Dynamics, Economics & Policy based in Washington, D.C., and New Delhi, released the Superbugs video this week, along with a new report on trends in antibiotic resistance.

Last year, the organization also released research showing that certain types of bacteria responsible for causing urinary tract infections (UTIs) are becoming more difficult to treat with current antibiotics. ETC released the research via its online ResistanceMap, an online tool created to track changes in antibiotic drug use and resistance. A new, added feature of the ResistanceMap is ETC’s Drug Resistance Index, a way for non-experts to track changes in antibiotic effectiveness.

This research was funded by the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation. Urinary tract infections account for about 8.6 million visits to health care providers each year, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. More than half of U.S. women will get a UTI in their lifetime.

“Without proper antibiotic treatment, UTIs can turn into bloodstream infections, which are much more serious and can be life-threatening,” said Ramanan Laxminarayan, director of Extending the Cure (ETC). “These findings are especially disturbing because there are few new antibiotics to replace the ones that are becoming less effective,” says Laxminarayan. 

Read a previous NewPublicHealth interview with Ramanan Laxminarayan about ETC’s research and Drug Resistance Index.

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