Category Archives: Community-based care

Sep 23 2014
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Recommended Reading: Culture of Health Prize Winner Taos Pueblo on Health Affairs

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Earlier this year, Taos Pueblo, N.M., was chosen by the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF) as a Culture of Health Prize winner for its efforts to improve community health by declaring self-governance. As part of a new ongoing series, Health Affairs blog has featured a piece by local Taos Pueblo leader Ezra Bayles on the community’s health successes.

Taos Pueblo is a National Historic Landmark where Native Americans have continuously lived for more than 1,000 years. Approximately 1,350 people call it the sovereign nation home. Despite its concerted efforts to keep its ancient oral language, culture and traditions alive, the community faces serious public health issues that are rooted in high rates of poverty and unemployment. Approximately 47 percent of pueblo youth under age 20 are overweight or obese and 21 percent of its adults have diabetes.

As a means to address these troubling issues, in 2007 the Taos Pueblo Tribal Council took steps toward self-governance, which allowed them to reorganize and streamline community services.

“We’ve taken on even more responsibility and are taking on the programs, functions and services to serve our people,” said Shawn Duran, Tribal Programs Administrator for Taos Pueblo, to NewPublicHealth earlier this year. “We’re finding solutions that we’re familiar with and turning that into programs that work for our people.”

Taos Pueblo’s efforts include:

  • Forming the Red Willow Community Growers Cooperative and the Red Willow Farmers Market in order to revive and celebrate the tribe’s agricultural heritage while also providing healthier food options.
  • Serving children ages 1 to 5 with the Taos Pueblo Head Start and My First School, which incorporates healthy eating while also instilling a strong sense of community.
  • Creating the Public Health Nursing Department, which sends a Native American nurse and two trained Community Health Workers directly to people’s doors as a way to make accessing care easier.

To learn more about Taos Pueblo’s prize-winning efforts to improve health, read the Health Affairs blog post.

>>Bonus Links: Learn more about the 2014 RWJF Culture of Health Prize winners and read NewPublicHealth coverage of the prize announcement.

>>Bonus Content: Watch a NewPublicHealth video on Taos Pueblo’s efforts to build a Culture of Health. 

Sep 5 2014
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Faces of Public Health: Nicholas Mukhtar, Healthy Detroit

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Last June, the Washington Post held a live event, Health Beyond Health Care, which brought together doctors, bankers, architects, teachers and others to focus on health beyond the doctor’s office. The goal of the Washington, D.C., event—which was co-sponsored by the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation others—was to showcase examples of communities working with partners to create cultures of health.

Healthy Detroit is a shining example. The project is a 501(c)(3) public health organization dedicated to building a culture of healthy, active living in the city of Detroit. It was formed less than a year ago in response to the U.S. Surgeon General’s National Prevention Strategy (NPS.) The NPS offers guidance on choosing the most effective and actionable methods of improving health and well-being, and envisions a prevention-oriented society where all sectors recognize the value of health.

NewPublicHealth recently spoke with Nicholas Mukhtar, founder and CEO of Healthy Detroit.

NewPublicHealth: How did Healthy Detroit get its start?

Nicholas Mukhtar: I was just about to the MPH part of a joint MPH/MD degree and had  always wanted to be a surgeon. But as I started living in the city and getting more involved in the community, I really saw a different side of health care, and to me it just became more rewarding to focus on the systemic issues in the health care system, more so than treating people once they already got sick. I’ve now finished the MPH part of my degree, and am starting on my MD degree.

So I started sending out a number of emails to different people and reached out to Dr. Regina Benjamin, then the U.S. Surgeon General, as well as local individuals. And then we established our mission, which was really to build a culture of prevention in the city while implementing the National Prevention Strategy. 

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Aug 20 2014
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Recommended Reading: RWJF Culture of Health Prize Winner Spokane County on Health Affairs Blog

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Earlier this year, Spokane County, Wash.,was chosen by the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF) as a Culture of Health Prize winner for its efforts to improve community health by increasing graduation rates. As part of a new ongoing series, Health Affairs blog has featured a piece by local Spokane leader Ben Smith on the community’s health successes.

Just eight years ago, the high school graduation rate for Spokane Public Schools was below 60 percent and 18 percent of the county’s students lived in poverty. In addition, the students who did attend college or technical school often failed to earn their degree, leaving them unprepared to fill available positions in the county’s more technical fields.

To address these issues, Priority Spokane emerged from a collaboration of local businesses, educators, health organizations and community nonprofits—all committed to improving the future of Spokane County residents by improving education. A report linking lack of education to poorer health helped spur a dramatic change. Over the next several years, the county emphasized increased collaboration and a clear vision to improve the high school graduation rate to 79.5 percent overall.

Spokane County’s efforts include:

  • Training teachers and childcare workers to mentor children who experience traumatic home events.
  • Developing an early warning system for at-risk students.
  • Establishing community attendance support teams that reengage truant students in school.
  • Starting Spokane Valley Tech, a high school designed to help students build careers in science, technology, engineering and math.

To learn more about Spokane’s prize-winning efforts to improve health, read the Health Affairs blog post.

>>Bonus Links: Learn more about the 2014 RWJF Culture of Health Prize winners and read NewPublicHealth coverage of the prize announcement.

>>Bonus Content: Watch a NewPublicHealth video on Spokane's efforts to build a Culture of Health.

 

Aug 19 2014
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Google Hangout Convenes Culture of Health Prize Winners to Discuss Lessons Learned in Creating Healthy Communities

This past June, the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF) announced the six winners of its 2014 Culture of Health Prize, which honors communities that place a high priority on health and bring partners together to drive local change. Each community, selected from more than 250 across the nation, received a no-strings-attached $25,000 cash prize in recognition of their accomplishments.  

Last week, RWJF brought together representatives from two of this year’s winners and one from last year in an online discussion, “Building a Culture of Health: What Does it Take?” Each community representative spoke about the barriers they’ve faced, how they overcame them and the role partnerships play in their ongoing success.

The discussion was moderated by Julie Willems Van Dijk, co-director of the RWJF County Health Rankings & Roadmaps and director of the RWJF Culture of Health Prize.

Alisa May, executive director of Priority Spokane and representing 2014 winner Spokane County, Wash., said that as a largely rural community of 210,000 people they’ve placed an emphasis on improving education at all levels. And they took a data-centric approach.

“Priority Spokane—which is a collaboration of community leaders—looked at the data, pulled community members together to talk about the issues that were most important to them, and educational attainment rose to the surface,” said May.

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Jul 9 2014
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Recommended Reading: The Washington Post and ‘Health Beyond Health Care’

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Last month the Washington Post held a live event, Health Beyond Health Care, that brought together doctors, bankers, architects, teachers and others to focus on health beyond the doctor’s office. The goal of the Washington, D.C., event—which was co-sponsored by the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF) and others—was to showcase examples of novel places that are working to create cultures of health, such as a newly designed school that promotes physical activity and healthy eating in Virginia, and free outdoor exercise classes in Detroit.

Videos from the Post event are now online and include conversations with:

The Post's continuing coverage also includes articles about how city design can open up new opportunities for health; how greenways and complete streets can get people moving; and how workplaces can get a makeover for healthier employees.

Over the next few days, NewPublicHealth will report on additional efforts across the country to promote a culture of health across neighborhoods, schools, homes and workplaces.

Explore the Post’s special report on “Health Beyond Health Care” here.

Jul 8 2014
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Langley Park Community Needs Assessment Report: Q&A with Zorayda Moreira-Smith, CASA de Maryland

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Late last month several organizations in Washington, D.C., and suburban Maryland—including CASA de Maryland, the Urban Institute, Prince George’s County Public Schools and other Langley Park Promise Neighborhood partners—released the Langley Park Community Needs Assessment Report, a year-long community assessment supported by the U.S. Department of Education Promise Neighborhoods program.

The assessment found that few of Langley Park’s 3,700 children—nearly all of whom were born in the United States—are currently on track for a strong future and that their lives are severely impacted by poverty; poor access to health care; high rates of neighborhood crime; chronic housing instability and school mobility; and low levels of parent education and English proficiency. Fewer than half of the community’s children graduate high school in four years, often because of high rates of early pregnancy and early entry into the work force to help support their families.

Following the release of the report, NewPublicHealth spoke with Zorayda Moreira-Smith, the Housing and Community Development Manager at CASA de Maryland.

NewPublicHealth: One factor in students not finishing high school in Langley Park is that many high schools students ages 16-19 drop out so that they can go to work and help support their families. Is this especially an issue of concern in the Latino community?

Zorayda Moreira-Smith: There are a number of reasons people drop out at that age. One of them is that 35 percent are working because of family need. The safety nets that are generally there for individuals aren’t there for immigrant communities. Most of the parents in these families probably left school after 8th or 9th grade. And once you reach a certain age, you’re also seen as an adult, so there’s an expectation that you help out with the family needs. For most of the families in the area, there’s a high unemployment rate or they have temporary jobs or are day laborers. So, as soon as children reach a certain age, there’s the expectation to start helping out financially and I think it’s very common.

And most immigrant families not only support the people that make up their household here in the United States, but also support their family in the countries of their origin. And while our data doesn’t show it, some of these individuals and kids in households could be living with family members who aren’t their parents—they could be their aunts or their uncles or what not. So, also as soon as they’re working, they’re often supporting their siblings or their parents or their grandparents in their origin countries. 

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Jun 27 2014
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Aspen Ideas Festival: Communities That Thrive

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This Thursday at Spotlight: Health, the two-and-a-half day extension of the Aspen Ideas Festival, a number of speakers discussed the many facets that are integral to building a community that thrives. Speakers included Kennedy Odede, the Co-Founder, President and CEO of Shining Hope for Communities; Belinda Reininger, Associate Professor of Health Promotion and Behavioral Science and the University of Texas School of Public Health; Gabe Klein, Senior Visiting Fellow at the Urban Land Institute; and Gina Murdock, Founder and Director of the Aspen Yoga Society.

Although the communities they serve and the work they do vary greatly, all four presenters agreed on four key themes:

  1. The importance of listening to the community
  2. Working with the residents, rather than over their heads, to create what they believe will be a thriving place to live
  3. Measuring outcomes
  4. Setting goals

To the first theme, Odede explained that “people in the community must be ready for change and we can’t import it.” Growing up in Kenya’s Kiberia Slum, Odede went on to found Shining Hope For Communities—an organization that combats gender inequality and extreme poverty in urban slums by linking free schools for girls to holistic community services for all. By connecting these services with a school for girls, Odede and Shining Hope for Communities show that benefiting women has a positive impact on the entire community. The organization’s model relies on community input and solutions.

In Brownsville, Texas, a family-oriented town requires a family-oriented approach to improving health. Sitting in one of the poorest metro areas in the nation, the town is known for its low graduation rates and high prevalence of obesity and diabetes. However, the community had a goal of being one of the healthiest areas in the state and began chipping away at the obstacles by including all residents.

“Everything we do is driven by families,” said Reininger. “We wanted to be the healthiest area in the state, and to get there we all had to be part of it.”

Brownsville is beginning to see improvements across the community in physical activity and food choice. In fact, the thriving and changing community has been selected by the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF) as one of this year’s Culture of Health prize winners. 

Gabe Klein, who in addition to his work with the Urban Land Institute is a former Vice President of Zipcar, spoke about the importance of communication in affecting community change. “In Chicago, we never talked about bike lanes for the sake of bike lanes, we talked about opportunities for better health and ways to get where you’re going,” said Klein. “You have to communicate the larger vision.”

The session moderator, RWJF President and CEO Risa Lavizzo-Mourey, stressed the importance of goal setting and metrics. According to Lavizzo-Mourey, defining a vision is critical to success and measurements lead you to the outcomes you are trying to reach.

Jun 26 2014
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The Way to Wellville — Spotlight: Health Q&A with Esther Dyson

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At this week’s Spotlight: Health conference, an expansion this year of the annual Aspen Ideas Festival, angel investor Esther Dyson will be talking about “The Way to Wellville,” a contest that her nonprofit Health Initiative Coordinating Council—or “HICCup”—is organizing to encourage a rethinking of how communities produce health. The Way to Wellville is a five-year national competition among five communities to see which can make the greatest improvements in five measures of health and economic vitality.

“In the end, we hope to show that the best way to produce health is to change multiple interacting factors—diet, physical activity, preventive measures, smoking and the like—as well as more effective traditional health care,” said Dyson. “We’re less concerned with specific ‘innovations’ or digital miracles and more with simply applying what we already know at critical density.”

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The five health measures have not been finalized yet, but are likely to include health impact, financial impact, social/environmental impact (such as crime rate or high school graduation rate), sustainability (such as a health financing system) and a specific “wild card” that each community will set for itself, such as teenage pregnancy or smoking rates.

NewPublicHealth spoke with Dyson ahead of the Spotlight: Health conference about the Wellville contest.

NewPublicHealth: How did the contest come about?

Esther Dyson: I had signed up to be a judge on the Health Care X Prize, but unfortunately it never materialized. For the next few years I kept thinking somebody should do this, and as I got more and more interested in health, I thought that with greater and greater enthusiasm. I had to give some remarks at a quantified self conference last year and was going to say that “someone should do this.” But I realized that would be a very lame talk and ultimately I announced that I would do it. Having appointed myself, I arranged several open-call brainstorming sessions. At one of them, a nice gentleman showed up with lots of awkward questions about metrics, funding, evaluation...the usual! So I appointed him as CEO. That’s Rick Brush, who formerly worked at Cigna and more recently has been running asthma-prevention programs with innovative financial models.

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Jun 26 2014
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RWJF Honors Six Communities with the 2014 Culture of Health Prizes

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Building a Culture of Health—one where health is a part of everything we do—will not be an easy task. In fact, it will be very hard, admitted Risa Lavizzo-Mourey, MD, MBA, president and CEO of the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation.

It’s a “call to action for all of us,” said Bill Frist, “but these six communities show it can be done.” The six communities in question are the 2014 winners of the RWJF Culture of Health Prize, announced yesterday at the Aspen Ideas Festival. Each community, while different in its own way, thinks about health in a whole new way, as being impacted by all aspects of daily life—from food production to urban design.

Why were these communities chosen from more than 250 applicants from across the country? They’re harnessing the power of partnerships; focusing on lasting solutions; working on the social and economic factors that impact health, such as education and poverty; creating equal opportunities for health for everyone in the community; making the most of resources; and measuring and sharing results.

But what really sets the Prize communities apart, said Lavizzo-Mourey—the “magic ingredient” and the “secret sauce”—are passion, purpose and even joy.

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Jun 25 2014
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Building a Culture of Health in America

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“What we mean by ‘building a Culture of Health’ is shifting the values—and the actions—of this country so that health becomes a part of everything we do,” said Risa Lavizzo-Mourey, MD, MBA, president and CEO of theRobert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF), during her keynote address at Spotlight: Health. RWJF is a founding underwriter of the two-and-a-half day expansion of the annual Aspen Ideas Festival.

“With health, each one of us can make the most of life’s opportunities,” she said. “That’s why we at the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation have made building a Culture of Health our North Star—the central aim of everything we do.”

Risa 22666 Risa Lavizzo-Mourey, RWJF President and CEO

Lavizzo-Mourey explained that the Foundation brought the Culture of Health concept to the Festival because of this year’s theme of “Imagining 2024.”

“When it comes to building a Culture of Health, I believe a decade from now we will have a powerful story of how we resolved to no longer accept that our nation spends more than $2.7 trillion dollars on health care, and yet continues to lose $227 billion dollars in productivity each year because of poor health,” she said.

Lavizzo-Mourey told the audience—which included health thought leaders from around the country—that building a true Culture of Health means changing our current understanding of health and creating a society where everyone has the opportunity to lead a healthy life. She gave the example of the Metro system in Washington, D.C., where babies born in the region of the Red Line—which intersects some of the wealthiest counties in the country—can expect to live to be 84 years old. However, babies born just a few stops away will have lives that are up to seven years shorter.

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According to Lavizzo-Mourey, there are multiple ideas being practiced around the country that contribute to the emerging Culture of Health,  including:

  • Helping patients with things such as housing and food assistance at every medical visit.
  • Changing the workplace culture to be a healthier one, including using stairs instead of elevators and holding standing or walking meetings.

She also enumerated several key ways that RWJF is working to build a sustainable Culture of Health, including committing $500 million toward reversing the U.S. childhood obesity epidemic; helping to ensure that everyone who is eligible for health care coverage knows about the benefits available to them; encouraging businesses to take the lead in investing in the wellbeing of the communities they serve; and addressing community violence.

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