Category Archives: Patient-Centered Care

Oct 31 2014
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With New Apps, Product Recall Information is Just a Consumer’s Touch Away

The U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC) awarded prizes this week for four new online applications to help consumers track product recalls. Earlier this year, the CPSC challenged developers to create apps to help consumers track recall announcements and safety incidents involving consumer products. Nine developers submitted proposals, using the CPSC’s SaferProducts.gov website.

The CPSC’s research finds that recalls impact both consumers who purchase new products and consumers who purchase products—such as cribs and high chairs, whose safety standards change over the years—at yard sales and thrift stores. The products’ bar codes can be used by some of the apps to determine whether there has been a recall. Others check user emails for information on products purchased online.

The four new apps:

  • Safety Checker usually needs just three fields filled in or the bar code scanned to find recall data. The app works with iOS and Android devices.
  • Recall Pro uses Google Chrome to help consumers find recall information before making an online purchase.
  • The “Slice” app checks purchases via email inboxes against the CPSC’s recall list and is available for iOS and Android users.
  • Total Recall 101 checks a user’s email inbox and archives for references to purchased products, including product receipts and conversations with friends (but emails remain private to the user). The app matches products against the CPSC’s recall list and alerts users to any problems.

>>Bonus Link: Injuries cause tens of thousands of deaths in the United States each year. Find more information on product safety advice from the CPSC.

Jul 1 2014
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Aspen Ideas Festival: Better Health as Better Business

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“Getting cigarettes out of our stores is a first step to making pharmacies a place where health happens,” said Troy Brennan, Executive Vice President and Chief Medical Officer of CVS Caremark Corporation, of the company’s decision earlier this year to stop selling tobacco products in its stores. In a Spotlight: Health session at the Aspen Ideas Festival last week, Brennan and other business CEOs discussed how making health a priority can lead to better business outcomes.

By decreasing the number of places that consumers are exposed to cigarettes and eliminating the convenience of tobacco, he said that CVS is actively trying to reduce smoking rates in the areas it serves. However, the healthy decision is also good for the company’s bottom line—already the decision has had positive business results that it didn’t anticipate, including an increase in the company’s stock price following the announcement.

“Companies that make health a priority—consumers gravitate toward that,” he said. “That’s the business incentive.”

Joining Brennan in the conversation, Vitality Institute Executive Director Derek Yach added that the private sector needs to complement public efforts when it comes to health and prevention. For example, taxes and increased prices must work in concert to discourage consumers from unhealthy products or behaviors.

“There may be an economic hit in the short term,” said Yach of companies that make healthy choices easier. “But in the long term, businesses are going to get an inflow of customers who know that their values are aligned.”

Yach also encouraged using County Health Rankings data to understand the underlying risks in each local area, as businesses are uniquely positioned to tailor their interventions to what the surrounding community needs.

Mar 7 2014
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Faces of Public Health: NewPublicHealth Q&A with Dr. Ronald Yee, NACHC

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Community Health Centers serve more than 22 million people at more than 9,000 sites located throughout all 50 states and U.S. territories, and have become needed health centers in particular for people newly insured under the Affordable Care Act (ACA) who have not previously had relationships with healthcare providers.

The National Association of Community Health Centers (NACHC) was organized in 1971 and works with a network of state health center and primary care organizations to serve health centers in several ways, including to:

  • Provide research-based advocacy for health centers and their clients.
  • Educate the public about the mission and value of health centers. 
  • Train and provide technical assistance to health center staff and boards.
  • Develop alliances with private partners and key stakeholders to foster the delivery of primary health care services to communities in need.

Ronald A. Yee, MD, became chief medical officer of the NACHC last year. NewPublicHealth recently spoke with Yee about the mission of health centers and their new roles under the Affordable Care Act.

NewPublicHealth: What field of medicine did you practice before taking on your new role?

Ronald A. Yee: I am a family physician. I worked for 20 years at a community migrant health center in Fresno County. I basically practiced full-scope family medicine including obstetrics, so I was delivering babies up until October of last year when I came to NACHC. So I was on the frontlines doing patient care and I was also the chief medical officer for our health center. I got involved earlier in my career with NACHC on a state and then national level, was on the board and then became chief medical officer.

NPH: Who is most likely to use the services of a community health center?

Yee: Health centers provide about one quarter of all the primary care visits for low-income populations, which include about one in seven people who are uninsured, or one out of every 15 Americans. With the roll out of the Affordable Care Act we’re seeing a big surge in demand among the newly insured, whether that’s through Medicaid expansions or the health insurance exchanges. Many of our patients who previously paid on a sliding scale basis are now covered through the ACA, which is helping us extend the funding we have.

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Feb 4 2014
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Are You Taking the Right Medicine?

Caring for the millions of people acquiring health coverage under the Affordable Care Act will require many more primary care providers than are currently available. At a session today on New Models and Workforce Innovations for Primary Care Access at the 2014 National Health Policy Conference convened by AcademyHealth, presenters talked about emerging specialists for primary care, including nurses, physician assistants and care coordinators, who are also known as community health workers.

Pharmacists are also included in that provider model. Jeffrey Kang, MD, MPH, senior vice president of health and wellness at Walgreens, presented data on a model program the pharmacy chain has at more than a dozen hospitals which is helping reduce hospital readmissions. Walgreens has pharmacies at dozens of hospitals across the United States and with its pilot program, called WellTransitions, works with hospital discharge staff on medicine instructions and then follows up with phone calls once patients are home.

Kang said a key question is whether someone is taking the right medicine. In the medication orders system there is no procedure, other than patient initiative, for stopping a previously prescribed medication. For example, if a patient had been taking a blood pressure medication before a hospital stay and then is prescribed a new one in the hospital, they may still have vials of the drug at home, and studies show they commonly continue taking the drug, either instead of, or in addition to the drug prescribed during the recent hospital stay.

With the WellTransitions program, drugs are delivered to the patient before discharge, avoiding a trip to the pharmacy, and pharmacists follow up at 9 days and 25 days.

Walgreens launched the program in 2012 and released data late last year that showed that early results indicate that within the first 6 months that WellTransitions was operational in five hospitals, the 30-day readmission rate for patients in the program was 9.4 percent, compared with 14.3 percent for patients not participating in the program.