Search Results for: "campaign of the month"

Jul 24 2014
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Public Health Campaign of the Month: A Public Health Reason to Post a Selfie

NewPublicHealth continues a new series to highlight some of the best public health education and outreach campaigns every month. Submit your ideas for Public Health Campaign of the Month to info@newpublichealth.org.

The March of Dimes has launched a PSA “selfie” campaign to remind women that if a pregnancy is healthy then it’s best to aim for at least 39 completed weeks of gestation before scheduling a delivery. The campaign features photos of women well into their pregnancies—bellies out to there and all with broad smiles.

According to the March of Dimes, important development of the brain, lungs and other organs occurs during the last weeks of pregnancy. The organization, along with state and local health departments, has increased its attention on the issue in the last few years.

“Every week of pregnancy is crucial to a newborn’s health,” said March of Dimes President Jennifer L. Howse, MD. “We believe that using ‘selfie’ photos will help reach today’s mothers-to-be, so they understand that healthy babies are worth the wait.”

The campaign photos all come (with permission) from women who have downloaded a free March of Dimes app, Cinemama, which lets expecting moms take and store selfies to give them a photo record of their pregnancies. Television stations across the country are giving free air time to broadcast the PSA.

>>Bonus Link: Read more on NewPublicHealth about maternal and infant health.

Jun 24 2014
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Public Health Campaign of the Month: National Crime Prevention Council, AAP Campaigns Urge Firearm Safety

NewPublicHealth continues a new series to highlight some of the best public health education and outreach campaigns every month. Submit your ideas for Public Health Campaign of the Month to info@newpublichealth.org.

Two national multimedia campaigns are urging precautions and safe practices when it comes to firearms and children.

The National Crime Prevention Council (NCPC)—in partnership with the Ad Council and funded by the Bureau of Justice Assistance—has launched the Safe Firearms Storage campaign to encourage owners to make safe firearms storage a priority. According to a study by the RAND Corporation, about 1.4 million homes have firearms stored in a way that makes them accessible to children, at–risk youth, potential thieves and people who could harm themselves or others.

“We teach all drivers to buckle up in case of accidents and to lock their cars,” said Ann M. Harkins, President and CEO of the NCPC. “The same logic applies to this campaign; we want owners to lock up their firearms to prevent accidents and keep them out of the wrong hands. Safe storage ensures that owners are doing their part to increase public safety.”

In addition to a website, the NCPC campaign features television, radio, print, outdoor and online PSAs that call on firearms owners to use safety devices such as trigger locks, as well as to store ammunition in a separate locked container. A “Snapguide” illustrates options for properly storing a firearm in a household, and the website also offers resources to help firearm owners talk with their children about firearm safety.

The American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP), in partnership with the Brady Center to Prevent Gun Violence, is also making a beginning-of-summer push as part of its ongoing ASK campaign—“Asking Saves Kids”—to remind parents to ask whether there is an unlocked, loaded gun in a home before a child goes on a play date. A response of “yes” should be followed with questions about where the gun is and whether the children will be supervised. Concerned parents should then not be afraid to suggest the children play somewhere else, such as a playground or another home without a gun.

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Jun 9 2014
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Public Heath Campaign of the Month: ‘Know: BRCA’

The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has launched three very pink infographics aimed at raising awareness about breast cancer among young women who may not realize they can be at risk for the disease—usually because of a gene mutation inherited from their mother or father.

The campaign, called “Know:BRCA” uses pink for all three of the new infographics because that color is widely identified with breast cancer awareness campaigns. The graphics focus on:

  • Knowing about BRCA1 and BRCA2
  • Knowing that everyone has BRCA genes
  • Knowing your genetic risk factors
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According to the CDC, most breast cancers are found in women who are 50 years old or older. However, each year in the United States about 9,000 women younger than 40 are diagnosed with breast cancer. In this younger group the cancer is generally more aggressive, found at a later stage, has lower survival rates and can often be linked to a mutation in one or two genes called BRCA1 and BRCA2.

Usually the BRCA genes protect people from cancer, but mutations to the genes can increase the risk of breast and ovarian cancer in general and especially in younger women. Discussions with physicians and genetics counselors about family history of breast and ovarian cancer can determine the need to test for the gene mutations. And if the tests are positive, health care experts may advise preventive treatment to help avoid breast and ovarian cancer, such as long-term medication or prophylactic mastectomy—the surgery actress Angelina Jolie chose last year because of her family history of breast cancer.

Without treatment, women with a BRCA gene mutation are seven times more likely to get breast cancer and 30 times more likely to get ovarian cancer before age 70 than other women.

The goal of the new infographics is to encourage women to learn their family history of cancer and then talk to their doctor if they have:

  • Multiple relatives with breast cancer
  • Any relatives with ovarian cancer
  • Relatives who were diagnosed with breast or ovarian cancer before age 50

The CDC also recently released a new physician tool to help doctors advise young patients about BRCA testing and prophylactic treatment.

>>Bonus Link: Read a new New York Times story on the evolution of breast cancer treatment 

May 13 2014
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Public Health Campaign of the Month: ‘Save a Minute’ Stroke PSA

May is stroke awareness month and a new infographic from the American Stroke Association wants everyone to know minutes count when a stroke hits. The campaign uses research published by the Association this year in the campaign infographic to let people know that for each minute shaved off stroke response in a hospital, patients get back days of healthy living.

The infographic includes the  FAST warning signs and symptoms for stroke:

  • Face drooping
  • Arm weakness
  • Speech difficulty
  • Time to call 911

>>Bonus Content: The American Stroke Association has a site full of patient education resources on stroke awareness and prevention, including a very effective PSA on body language to help teach the FAST warning signs of stroke. The association also previously created another infographic on the FAST warning signs.

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Apr 2 2014
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PSA Campaign of the Month: Just Walk!

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Why walk? Well, today’s a good day to walk because it’s National Walking Day, an event hosted by the American Heart Association (AHA). And also every day is a good day to walk because research from the AHA finds that thirty minutes of walking each day had health benefits that include:

  • Weight loss
  • Lower blood pressure
  • Reduced risk of heart disease and diabetes
  • Increased well being

Walking, like other forms of exercise, releases endorphins linked to reduced depression and increased happiness—which certainly seems to be the case for the folks in the video PSA, Just Walk!, from the American Heart Association.

>>Bonus Links:

Mar 10 2014
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Public Health Campaign of the Month: Save the Fairy Tale Kingdom with Your Toothbrush!

NewPublicHealth continues a new series to highlight some of the best public health education and outreach campaigns every month. Submit your ideas for Public Health Campaign of the Month to info@newpublichealth.org.

Recent dental surveys find that less than half of children in America brush their teeth twice a day and research shows that dental decay is the most common chronic childhood disease in the United States.

To encourage kids to brush their teeth, the Ad Council recently launched a neat mobile app aimed at bringing public service announcements (PSAs) right to where they can be most useful—in this case, the bathroom sink. The new PSA is called “Toothsavers” and it's designed to encourage kids to brush their teeth for two minutes, twice a day.

Toothsavers is available free on the web at 2min2x.org/PlayToothsavers and as a downloadable app for iOS and Android (both smartphones and tablets).

The back story of Toothsavers is that an evil sorceress has cast a wicked spell, leaving everyone’s mouths to rot and be overrun by cavities. Now it's up to little toothbrushers to help Toothy and the Toothsavers save everyone's teeth!

Kids use the app to swipe and tab in order to brush and scrub away the spell for each of the kingdom’s denizens, including the Dragon, Little Red Riding Hood and the Pirate. And for every few days a child brushes their own teeth for two minutes, twice a day, they unlock a new character on the Toothsaver game. Brush for 30 days and kids get the chance to defeat the evil sorceress herself.

Features of the app include:

  • 10 different two-minute animations to add some fun to daily tooth brushing
  • 10 cartoon teeth that move on the screen when activated by a voice
  • An interactive map to chart daily tooth brushing
  • Parents can connect on Facebook and post whenever their child reaches a brushing milestone

Toothsavers is a program of the Partnership for Healthy Mouths, Healthy Lives, a coalition of 36 oral health organizations including the American Dental Association. The campaign’s goal is to motivate parents to take action to reduce their children’s risk of oral disease by making sure their kids are brushing their teeth for two minutes, twice a day. Toothsavers is the first mobile app to be entirely created by the Ad Council. “The game represents a huge milestone for us in our efforts to use gaming and mobile technology to effect social change,” said Ellyn Fisher, Vice President, Public Relations and Social Media.

Feb 10 2014
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Public Health Campaign of the Month: Air Pollution and Heart Health

>>NewPublicHealth continues a new series to highlight some of the best public health education and outreach campaigns every month. Submit your ideas for Public Health Campaign of the Month to info@newPublichealth.org.

In honor of American Heart Month, held each February, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has created a new Public Service Announcement (PSA) to educate the public and health care providers about the risks of air pollution to the heart.

"Over more than four decades of EPA history, we've made tremendous progress cleaning up the air we breathe by using science to understand the harmful effects of air pollution," said EPA Administrator Gina McCarthy. “While EPA continues to fight for clean air, Americans can take further action to protect their heart health by following the advice in our new PSA.”

One of EPA’s commitments in the U.S. Surgeon General’s National Prevention Strategy is to educate health care professionals on the health effects of air pollution, including heart risks. This PSA supports the Million Hearts Initiative, launched by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services in September 2011, to prevent one million heart attacks and strokes by 2017. 

Research has shown that air pollution can trigger heart attacks, stroke and worsen heart conditions, especially in people with heart disease—that’s one in three Americans. According to the EPA, very small particles are the pollutants of greatest concern for triggering health effects from exposure to air pollutants. These particles are found in transportation exhaust, haze, smoke, dust and sometimes even in air that looks clean. Particle pollution can also be found in the air at any time of the year. 

The new PSA advises people with heart disease to check the daily, color-coded Air Quality Index forecast. At code orange or higher, particle pollution can be harmful to people with heart disease. On bad air quality days, it is recommended to reschedule outdoor exercise or to exercise indoors instead, and avoid exercising near busy roads.

Air Quality Index forecasts for more than 400 cities are available on the forecast map through a free AirNow app for iPhone and Android phones, and through the free EnviroFlash e-mail service. To sign up, visit here and click on the “Apps” or “EnviroFlash” icons.

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Jan 3 2014
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Public Health Campaign of the Month: Teach for America’s Health

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>>NewPublicHealth continues a new series to highlight some of the best public health education and outreach campaigns every month. Submit your ideas for Public Health Campaign of the Month to info@newPublichealth.org.

With only nine percent of current college students actively choosing teaching as a career, the Ad Council has launched a new PSA series to help recruit more students to join the ranks of educators. The need is critical. The worry: Half of all teachers are eligible to retire in the next decade, according to Ad Council research, leaving the potential for critical shortages for trained professionals across the United States.

Education is not just a rung to the best job possible—research shows that education is also critical for improving the health of individuals and communities. An infographic created last year by NewPublicHealth to showcase the goals of the National Prevention Strategy—a strategic plan across federal agencies to improve U.S. population health—illustrated key links between education and health, including:

  • Each additional year of schooling represents an 11 percent increase in income
  • The more years of education a mother attains, the more likely her infant is to survive and thrive

Some of the taglines of the PSA series, designed to appeal to both students and mid-career professionals, include:

  • I’m a teacher, I make more
  • You don’t need to be famous to be unforgettable
  • You wanted to be a teacher when you were 12 years old; it’s time to put it back on your list
Nov 19 2013
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Public Health Campaign of the Month: ‘Don’t Mess With Mercury’ Campaign

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>>NewPublicHealth continues a new series to highlight some of the best public health education and outreach campaigns every month. Submit your ideas for Public Health Campaign of the Month to info@newPublichealth.org.

Glass thermometers. Compact fluorescent light (CFL) bulbs. Medical equipment. Gauges and other science equipment. Thermostats, switches and other electrical devices.

Mercury lives in all of these devices—and all can be found in schools. While it may be common, mercury is also incredibly dangerous. Mercury poisoning can negatively impact the nervous system, lungs and kidneys. It can even lead to brain damage or death.

Often mercury poisoning is the result of a kid thinking it’s “cool”— taking it, playing with, passing it around to friends. Metallic mercury easily vaporizes into a colorless, odorless, hazardous gas.

The Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry (ATSDR), part of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), has released a new website that brings together a suite of tools to educate kids, teachers, school administrators and parents about the dangers of mercury poisoning. They include an interactive human body illustration and facts sheets, as well as a 30-second “Don’t Mess With Mercury” animated video to raise awareness about the dangers of mercury.

Aug 20 2013
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Public Health Campaign of the Month: Who's Next?

NewPublicHealth is looking to highlight some of new and captivating public health education and outreach campaigns through our Public Health Campaign of the Month series. Have you worked with a successful and innovative campaign to help spread awareness of public health issues and engage your community in healthier behaviors? We want to recognize the great effort put into those campaigns and the positive work they are doing, so nominate them!

Campaigns could include videos, public service announcements in print or in video, websites, infographics, social media efforts, or other ways to spread the word about a particular public health issue.

To submit a campaign to be considered for the Public Health Campaign of the Month please send the following items to info@newpublichealth.org:

  • Name of the Campaign
  • Location
  • Website
  • Related image
  • What public health issue does it address, and what's the scope of the problem?
  • What methods are being used to address the issue?
  • What results have you seen thus far? Is it catching a lot of attention?
  • Contact information

Complete submissions will then be evaluated based on innovation, the ability for the campaign to be replicated in other areas, its potential for impact on the community. If your campaign is selected to be featured as an upcoming Public Health Campaign of the Month, we will contact you with any further questions.

>>Don’t forget to check back to see the latest innovative public health campaigns at NewPublicHealth!