Category Archives: News roundups

Mar 6 2014
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Public Health News Roundup: March 6

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Facebook Makes Changes to Combat Illegal Gun Sales
Facing mounting pressure from groups such as Mayors Against Illegal Guns and Mons Demand Action for Gun Sense in America, Facebook yesterday announced plans to remove offers to sell guns without background checks or across state lines. The social media site will being notifying users offering such sales of relevant laws a limit visibility of certain firearm-related posts to users ages 18 and older. Searchers for firearms on Facebook-owned Instagram will also return information on gun laws. The system will rely on users to report violating posts. "We will respond to posts that signal attempts to evade the law so we can delete them," said an AOL spokesman, according to The Wall Street Journal. Read more on violence.

Revamped SAT Designed to Increase Access to College
After only nine years using the “new” format, the College Board has announced changes to the SAT designed to focus the test more on important academic skills and increase access to college. In addition to making the essay section optional—which will put a perfect score back at 1600, from the 2400 of the past few years—the revised test will remove the penalty for incorrect answers or guessing and cut the more obscure vocabulary words. College Board President David Coleman said the changes were needed because the test had “become disconnected from the work of our high schools.” Coleman also announced fee waivers to low-income students who will now be able to apply to four colleges at no charge, according to The New York Times. Read more on education.

HUD Announces Funding to Provide Permanent Housing and Services to Low-Income People with Disabilities 
The U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) today announced the availability of approximately $120 million in funding for state housing agencies to provide long term project-based rental assistance to extremely low-income persons with disabilities, many of whom are transitioning out of institutional settings or are at high risk of homelessness. State housing agencies will be working with state Medicaid and Health and Human Service offices to identify, refer and conduct outreach to persons with disabilities who require long-term services and supports to live independently. Read more on housing.

Mar 5 2014
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Public Health News Roundup: March 5

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Georgia State University College of Law Names Ten Faculty Fellowships to Promote Public Health Law Education
The Georgia State University College of Law and its Center for Law Health & Society have announced ten faculty fellows to participate in the Future of Public Health Law Education: Faculty Fellowship Program. “This fellowship program is an extraordinary opportunity to promote innovative teaching, create a supportive community of practice and share best practices in teaching public health law,” said Charity Scott, JD, MSCM, Catherine C. Henson Professor of Law and director of the Center for Law, Health & Society. “The fellows’ projects will serve as models for innovation in public health law education and the resources developed will be shared with other law and public health faculty nationally.” The program is funded by the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation. Among the five faculty members serving as mentors will be Mary Crossley, JD, professor of law at the University of Pittsburgh School of Law, who NewPublicHealth previously spoke with about her role in the Scholars in Residence program. Read more on public health law.

Study: Better Boundaries, Enforcing Rules Can Improve Kids’ Sleep Health
Parents can improve their children’s sleep habits and overall health by setting boundaries around electronics use, enforcing rules and setting a good example, according to new findings from the National Sleep Foundation’s (NSF) Sleep in America poll. The annual study began in 1991, with the 2014 poll focusing on sleep practices and beliefs of the modern family with school-aged children. “For children, a good night’s sleep is essential to health, development and performance in school,” said Kristen L. Knutson, PhD, University of Chicago. “We found that when parents take action to protect their children’s sleep, their children sleep better.” The NSF recommends that children ages 6-10 get 11 hours of sleep per night, although the poll found that parents estimate their kids in that age group only get about 8.9 hours. The poll also found averages of 8.2 hours for kids ages 11-12, 7.7 hours for ages 13-14 and 7.1 hours ages 15-17; NSF recommends between 8.5 and 9.5 hours for each of those groups. Read more on pediatrics.

Stress of Racism Tied to Obesity in Black Women
Frequent experiences of racism are associated with a higher risk of obesity among African-American women, according to a new study in the American Journal of Epidemiology. Researchers analyzed data from the Black Women's Health Study, a longitudinal study of approximately 59,000 African-American women who were tracked beginning in 1995, finding that the psychosocial stress associated with long-term experience with racism can result in dysregulation of neuroendocrine functions that influence the accumulation of excess body fat. Yvette C. Cozier, DSc, MPH, assistant professor of epidemiology at Boston University who led the analyses, said in a release that work-place- and community-based programs to combat racism and interventions to reduce racism-induced stress could help prevent and combat obesity in high-risk communities. Approximately half of African-American women are obese, which raises their risk factors for cardiovascular diseases, type 2 diabetes, orthopedic problems, and death. Read more on health disparities.

Mar 4 2014
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Public Health News Roundup: March 4

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Army, NIH Studies Look at Mental Health Risks, Resilience in U.S. Soldiers
JAMA Psychiatry
has released a collection of three articles detailing the findings of a large-scale study of mental health risk and resilience in members of the U.S. Military. Among the findings of  The Army Study to Assess Risk and Resilience in Servicemembers (Army STARRS):

  • The rise in suicide deaths from 2004 to 2009 occurred not only in currently and previously deployed soldiers, but also among soldiers never deployed.
  • Nearly half of soldiers who reported suicide attempts indicated their first attempt was prior to enlistment.
  • Soldiers reported higher rates of certain mental disorders than civilians, including attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), intermittent explosive disorder (recurrent episodes of extreme anger or violence), and substance use disorder.

“These studies provide knowledge on suicide risk and potentially protective factors in a military population that can also help us better understand how to prevent suicide in the public at large,” said National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH) Director Thomas R. Insel, M.D.

The emphasis on mental health in the military comes at the same time as a small group of Vietnam veterans has filed suit against the U.S. government, alleging they received other-than-honorable discharges for violations that the psychiatric community and Army now understand were attributable to post-traumatic stress. The veterans say the government has resisted their attempts to upgrade the discharges. Read more on mental health.

NIH: Allergy Prevalence Consistent Across U.S. Regions, Although Type Varies
Allergy prevalence of allergies is consistent across all regions of the United States in every demographic except for children age 5 years and younger, according to a new study from the U.S. National Institutes of Health (NIH). Researchers analyzed blood serum data from approximately 10,000 Americans between 2005 and 2006. “Before this study, if you would have asked 10 allergy specialists if allergy prevalence varied depending on where people live, all 10 of them would have said yes, because allergen exposures tend to be more common in certain regions of the U.S.,” said Darryl Zeldin, MD, scientific director of the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences (NIEHS), part of NIH, in a release. “This study suggests that people prone to developing allergies are going to develop an allergy to whatever is in their environment. It’s what people become allergic to that differs.” The comprehensive study also examined and outlined risk factors that would make a person more likely to develop an allergy. Read more on the environment.

Study: SNAP for Just 6 Months Increases Kids’ Food Security Significantly
Children in households that participate in the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP)—previously known as the Food Stamp Program—for just six months experience significant increases in their “food security,” according to a new study in the journal Pediatrics. Food insecurity—or lack of easy access—is tied to a range of health and developmental problems. The study concluded that “SNAP serves a vital role in improving the health and well-being of low-income children by increasing food security” and that “Future research is needed to determine whether specific groups of children experience differential improvements in food security.” SNAP provided assistance to approximately 47 million people in 2013, with about half of those children. Read more on nutrition.

Mar 3 2014
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Public Health News Roundup: March 3

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EPA Sets Cleaner Fuel and Car Standards to Cut Air Pollution and Improve Health
The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) today finalized emission standards for cars and gasoline to significantly reduce harmful pollution and prevent thousands of premature deaths and illnesses. According to the EPA, the new standards will also create efficiency improvements for cars and trucks. The standards go into effect by 2017.

The new standards cut emissions of a range of harmful pollutants that can cause premature death and respiratory illnesses. By 2030, EPA estimates that up to 2,000 premature deaths; 50,000 cases of respiratory ailments in children; 2,200 hospital admissions and asthma-related emergency room visits; and 1.4 million lost school days, work days and days when activities would be restricted due to air pollution will be prevented. Total health-related benefits in 2030 will be between $6.7 and $19 billion annually.

The program will also reduce exposure to pollution near roads. More than 50 million people live, work, or go to school in close proximity to high-traffic roadways, and the average American spends more than one hour traveling along roads each day. Read more on environment.

Study Finds Many Parents Support Flu Shots at School
Half of parents in the United States would agree to have their children get their flu shots at school, according to a survey from the Brown School of Public Policy at Washington University in St. Louis. Researchers at the school conducted a nationally representative online survey of more than 1,000 parents of school-aged children. Convenience was the chief reason for parents supporting flu shots at school. Thirty two percent of parents surveyed were not sure if they would consent to giving the shots at school and 17 percent said they would not consent. Most likely to support flu shots at school were college-educated parents and parents of uninsured children. The study was published in the journal Vaccine.

Flu season can last in the United States through April, according to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). This is especially the case in communities where the season started later in the fall or early winter. In a recent report, CDC researchers found that the flu vaccine “offered substantial protection against the flu this [2013-2014] season,” reducing a vaccinated person’s risk of having to go to the doctor for flu illness by about 60 percent across all ages

 “We are committed to the development of better flu vaccines, but existing flu vaccines are the best preventive tool available now. This season vaccinated people were substantially better off than people who did not get vaccinated. The season is still ongoing. If you haven’t yet, you should still get vaccinated," said CDC director Tom Frieden, MD, MPH, in a recent release. Read more on flu.

Online Ratings Currently Not Used Much to Choose Physicians
Online ratings that review physicians can influence which doctor a patient chooses, but most patients rank insurance acceptance and distance from home or office as more important, according to a new study in JAMA.

  • 9 percent of responders said they consider doctor rating websites “very important” in their search for a physician
  • 89 percent of responders ranked “accepts my health insurance” as “very important.”
  • 59 percent said a convenient office location very important

The study also found that only five percent of those surveyed have ever posted ratings online, although two-thirds of responders were aware of ranking sites, a higher percentage than found in previous studies.

“These may seem useful, but no one is regulating this ‘crowdsourced’ information about doctors. There’s no way to verify its reliability, so online ratings may not currently be the best resource for patients,” David Hanauer, a primary care pediatrician and clinical associate professor of pediatrics at C.S. Mott Children’s Hospital in Detroit. Read more on community health.

Feb 28 2014
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Public Health News Roundup: February 28

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WIC Expands to Offer More Options to 9 Million Poor Women and Children
Newly announced changes to the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants and Children—also known as WIC—will expand access to fruits, vegetables and whole grains for approximately 9 million poor women and young children. The changes include an increase over 30 percent, or $2 per month, in the allowance for each child's fruit and vegetable purchases. They also allow fresh produce instead of jarred infant food for babies. The changes, which were recommended by the Institute of Medicine, mark the first comprehensive revisions to the voucher program allowances since 1980. Read more on nutrition.

Survey Finds Majority of Hispanic Adults Are Not Confident in Their Understanding of Key Insurance Terms
While the majority of white, non-Hispanic adults feel confident in their understanding of key insurance terms, the same cannot be said for Hispanics. According to the Urban Institute’s Health Reform Monitoring Survey (HRMS), only one in four Hispanic adults express confidence in their understanding of terms such as “premium,” “copayment” and “deductible.” This disparity is an impediment to Affordable Care Act marketplace and Medicaid enrollment. The findings demonstrate the need for culturally appropriate education campaigns and bilingual navigators to provide assistance in target communities. The quarterly HRMS is funded by the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation and the Ford Foundation. Read more on health disparities.

New Program to Train Police Officers in Bleeding Control for Mass Casualty Victims
As part of ongoing efforts to increase the number of survivors of active shooter or mass casualty incidents, more than 36,000 police officers across the country will receive bleeding control kits and training this year. The goal is to train officers to slow or stop bleeding at the scene before other first responders arrive. The five-step “THREAT” approach:

  • T - Threat suppression
  • H – Hemorrhage control
  • RE – Rapid Extrication to safety
  • A – Assessment by medical providers
  • T – Transport to definitive care.

The initiative is led by the Hartford Consensus, a collaborative group of trauma surgeons, federal law enforcement and emergency responders, and driven by the American College of Surgeons, the Federal Bureau of Investigation, the Major Cities Chiefs Association and the Prehospital Trauma Life Support program.  “Controlling hemorrhage has to be a core law enforcement tactic,” said Alexander Eastman, MD, MPH, FACS, chief of trauma at UT Southwestern/Parkland Memorial Hospital and Dallas Police Department lieutenant, in a release. “We saw the dramatic impact of this tactic in the Tucson, Ariz. shooting in 2011. With training and tourniquets, law enforcement officers will save lives – many lives.” Read more on violence.

Feb 27 2014
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Public Health News Roundup: February 27

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FDA Proposes New ‘Nutrition Facts’ Food Labels
The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has put forth a new proposed Nutrition Facts label for packaged foods. The updated design would reflect scientific information not available when the current label was designed two decades ago. For example, it would replace out-of-date serving sizes and feature a design that highlights key parts of the label, such as calories and serving sizes.  “For 20 years consumers have come to rely on the iconic nutrition label to help them make healthier food choices,” said FDA Commissioner Margaret A. Hamburg, MD. “To remain relevant, the FDA’s newly proposed Nutrition Facts label incorporates the latest in nutrition science as more has been learned about the connection between what we eat and the development of serious chronic diseases impacting millions of Americans.” Read more on nutrition.

Study: One in Five U.S. Health Facilities Don’t Provide Hand Sanitizer Everywhere Needed
One in five U.S. health facilities don’t make hand sanitizer available everywhere necessary, needlessly increasing the risk for health-care associated infections, according to a new study in the American Journal of Infection Control. In addition, approximately half of the hospitals, ambulatory care facilities and long-term care facilities included in their budgets funds for proper hand hygiene training. The study examine compliance with the World Health Organization’s hand hygiene guidelines at 168 facilities in 42 states and Puerto Rico. "When hospitals don't focus heavily on hand hygiene, that puts patients at unnecessary risk for preventable health care-associated infections," said by Laurie Conway, RN, MS, CIC, PhD student at Columbia Nursing, in a release. "The tone for compliance with infection control guidelines is set at the highest levels of management, and our study also found that executives aren't always doing all that they can to send a clear message that preventing infections is a priority." Read more on infectious disease.

CDC Foundation Expands Safe Injection Campaign
The CDC Foundation and Eli Lilly are partnering to expand the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s (CDC) Safe Injection Practices Coalition—a safety awareness campaign that provides information for health providers and patients. According to CDC data, more than 150,000 patients have been notified of potential exposure to hepatitis and HIV because of unsafe injection practices in U.S. health care settings since 2001, and CDC researchers have found that medical injections are an overlooked source of infections and outbreaks. Planned actives of the partnership include:

  • Expand  the One & Only Campaign to new audiences such as individual and group-owned physician practices
  • Educate health care providers through new and enhanced training and communication materials to address emerging issues
  • Improve the Safe Injection Practices Coalition website and social media platforms to share resources and toolkits with new audiences
  • Engage new and existing Safe Injection Practices Coalition partners

Read more on prevention.

Feb 26 2014
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Public Health News Roundup: February 26

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New Study Shows Latinos of Different Origins Can Have Different Diseases, Risk Factors
A review of a recent study, the Hispanic Community Health Study/Study of Latinos (HCHS/SOL) that enrolled about 16,415 Hispanic/Latino adults, finds diversity among Latinos not only in ancestry, culture and economic status, but also in prevalence of certain diseases, risk factors and lifestyle habits. The study was done among Latinos living in  San Diego, Chicago, Miami, and the Bronx, N.Y., who self-identified with Central American, Cuban, Dominican, Mexican, Puerto Rican, or South American origins.

Findings include:

  • The percentage of people who reported having asthma ranged from 7.4 (among those of Mexican ancestry) to 35.8 (among those of Puerto Rican ancestry).
  • The percentage of individuals with hypertension ranged from 20.3 (South American) to 32.2 (Cuban).
  • The percentage of people eating five or more servings of fruits/vegetables daily ranged from 19.2 (Puerto Rican origin) to 55.0 (Cuban origin). Also, men reported consuming more fruit and vegetables than women.
  • Women reported a much lower consumption of sodium than men among all Hispanic groups represented in the study.
  • About 1 in 3 individuals had pre-diabetes, also fairly evenly distributed among Hispanic groups.
  • Only about half of individuals with diabetes among all Hispanic groups had it under control.

A second study among the same population will start in October 2014 to reassess certain health measurements and understand the relationship between the identified risk factors during the first visit and future disease in Hispanic populations. Read more on health disparities.

Study: Acetaminophen During Pregnancy Tied to Increased Risk for ADHD, HKDs in Kids
Children whose mothers used acetaminophen during pregnancy are at higher risk for developing attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD)–like behavioral problems or hyperkinetic disorders (HKDs), according to a new study in JAMA Pediatrics. Researchers analyzed data on 64,322 children and mothers enrolled in the Danish National Birth Cohort from 1996 to 2002, finding that approximately 56 percent of the mothers reported acetaminophen use during pregnancy. Their children were 37 percent more likely to be diagnosed with an HKD, 29 percent more likely to be prescribed ADHD medications and 13 percent more likely to exhibit ADHD-like behaviors at age 7. Approximately five to six percent of babies born today will develop ADHD symptoms at some point in their lives. Jorn Olsen, MD, one of the study's authors and a professor of epidemiology at UCLA and at Aarhus University in Denmark, noted that the risk was relatively modest, but that “for women who are pregnant and who have not taken these drugs, I think that the take-home message would be a lot of the use of these particular drugs during pregnancy is not really necessary," according to Reuters. Read more on maternal and infant health.

Stigma Remains Powerful Barrier Impeding Mental Health Care for Many
The stigma surrounding mental health continues to remain a very real and very serious barrier keeping many people from seeking the health care they need, according to a new study in the journal Psychological Medicine. The analysis, from researchers at King’s College London and funded in part by the U.S. National Institutes of Health, combined the results of 144 studies including more than 90,000 people from around the world. Approximately 25 percent of people are estimated to have mental health problems, but only 75 percent of those in the United States and Europe seek treatment; delays in treatment are linked to worse outcomes for many mental health disorders, such as psychosis, bipolar disorder, major depression and anxiety disorders. The study pointed specifically to “treatment stigma” (the stigma associated with using mental health services or receiving mental health treatment) and “internalized stigma” (shame, embarrassment) as the most significant barriers, as well as concerns about confidentiality, wanting to handle the problem by themselves and not believing they needed help. "We now have clear evidence that stigma has a toxic effect by preventing people seeking help for mental health problems,” said Professor Graham Thornicroft, from the college’s Institute of Psychiatry and the study’s lead author. “The profound reluctance to be ‘a mental health patient’ means people will put off seeing a doctor for months, years, or even at all, which in turn delays their recovery." Read more on mental health.

Feb 25 2014
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Public Health News Roundup: February 25

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Cold Winter Raises Concerns about Energy Insecurity
A new brief by researchers at the Mailman School of Public Health at Columbia University looks at energy insecurity (EI), which is measured by the proportion of household energy expenditures relative to household income. EI tends to impact low-income families in part because they often live in older homes and apartments that haven’t been constructed to conserve heat.

Key findings of the brief include:

  • More than half of families affected by economic EI are living in poverty (below 100 percent of the federal poverty level) and about one third are extremely poor.
  • Approximately half of all households facing economic EI are black/African-American and about one-third are white.
  • Geographically, the largest proportion (46 percent) of children in households with economic EI resides in the South.
  • Over half of families with economic EI are renters; 41 percent are homeowners.

According to the Mailman researchers, the main safety net program for EI, the Low-Income Home Energy Assistance Program (LIHEAP), covers only a fraction of the overall need. Of the estimated 10-15 million homes eligible for benefits in 2012, 5.5 million received assistance for reasons such as lack of awareness by people who could benefit and program budget cuts. Read more on poverty.

Many Adults with Depression Symptoms Have Not Consulted a Professional
A new report by the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) finds that close to 40 percent of the 15 million American adults who experienced a major depressive episode in the past year did not talk to a counselor or health provider. A major depressive episode is defined as a period of at least two weeks when a person experienced a depressed mood or loss of interest or pleasure in daily activities and had at least four of seven additional symptoms reflecting the criteria as described in the fourth edition of the American Psychiatric Association’s Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of the Mental Disorders (DSM-IV). “This report shows that too many Americans still needlessly suffer in silence instead of reaching out to providers for help in getting them on the road to recovery through effective treatment and supports,” said Paolo del Vecchio, the director of SAMHSA’s Center for Mental Health Services. “We are raising awareness about the hope for recovery from these conditions, helping communities identify their behavioral health needs, and increasing education about access to treatment for all Americans through the Affordable Care Act and the new parity protections for insurance coverage.” Read more about mental health.

EPA Proposes New Safety Measures to Protect Farm Workers from Pesticide Exposure
The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has announced proposed revisions to the Worker Protection Standard to protect the nation’s two million farm workers and their families from pesticide exposure. The EPA is proposing significant improvements to worker training regarding the safe usage of pesticides, including how to prevent and effectively treat pesticide exposure. Increased training and signage will inform farm workers about their protections under the law. The EPA has also proposed that children under 16 be legally barred from handling all pesticides, with an exemption for family farms. The revisions are based on more than a decade of extensive stakeholder input by federal and state partners and from across the agricultural community including farm workers, farmers and industry. Read more on the Environmental Protection Agency.

Feb 24 2014
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Public Health News Roundup: February 24

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Under Tobacco Control Act Authority, FDA Orders Stop to Sale, Distribution of Four Tobacco Products
For the first time the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has used its authority under the Family Smoking Prevention and Tobacco Control Act to order a stop to the continued sale and distribution of four tobacco products. The FDA ruled that Sutra Bidis Red, Sutra Bidis Menthol, Sutra Bidis Red Cone, and Sutra Bidis Menthol Cone were not “substantially equivalent” to products commercially available as of Feb. 15, 2007. The FDA determined that Jash International did not identify a product by which to assess substantial equivalence, as well as other required information. “Companies have an obligation to comply with the law—in this case, by providing evidence to support an SE application,” said Mitch Zeller, J.D., director of the FDA’s Center for Tobacco Products, in a release. “Because the company failed to meet the requirement of the Tobacco Control Act, the FDA’s decision means that, regardless of when the products were manufactured, these four products can no longer be legally imported or sold or distributed through interstate commerce in the United States.” Read more on tobacco.

NGA Releases Report on Prescription Drug Abuse Epidemic
As part of the National Governors Association’s (NGA) 2014 Winter Meeting, NGA Vice Chair Colorado Gov. John Hickenlooper and Alabama Gov. Robert Bentley have released a report, Reducing Prescription Drug Abuse: Lessons Learned from an NGA Policy Academy, detailing their year-long look on how to reduce the growing epidemic; prescription drug abuse is the United States’ fastest growing drug problem and the second most-common type of drug abuse for youth ages 12-17. Among the findings:

  • Leadership matters
  • Prescribing behavior needs to change
  • Disposal options should be convenient and cost-effective
  • Prescription drug monitoring programs are underused
  • Public education is critical
  • Treatment is essential
  • Data, metrics and evaluation must drive policy and practice

“The abuse of prescription drugs continues to be seen in communities across the nation,” said Hickenlooper. “This initiative helped states develop effective strategies to help decrease the number of individuals who are misusing or abusing prescription drugs and the resulting number of people who are harmed or die.” Read more on prescription drugs.

HHS Issues Proposals for Next Edition of EHR Technology Certification Criteria
The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services’ (HHS) Office of the National Coordinator for Health Information Technology (ONC) has issued proposals for the next edition of the electronic health record (EHR) technology certification criteria. “The proposed 2015 Edition EHR certification criteria reflect ONC’s commitment to incrementally improving interoperability and efficiently responding to stakeholder feedback,” said Karen DeSalvo, MD, MPH, national coordinator for health IT. “We will continue to focus on setting policy and adopting standards that make it possible for health care providers to safely and securely exchange electronic health information and for patients to become an integral part of their care team.” Compliance with the 2015 Edition would be voluntary (if EHR developers are in compliance with the 2014 Edition, they would not need to recertify) and the final rule will be issued later this summer. Read more on technology.

Feb 21 2014
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Public Health News Roundup: February 21

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HHS, Heart Disease Organizations Join Forces to Vastly Reduce Premature Death Linked to Heart Conditions by 2025
Leaders from the World Heart Federation , the American Heart Association, the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, and the American College of Cardiology are joining together to help cut premature mortality from cardiovascular disease by at least 25 percent by 2025.
 Key strategies will include secondary prevention efforts for people who have already experienced a heart incident, or have established heart disease, as well as primary prevention strategies in the United States and around the world. “Heart disease can touch anyone, no matter where you live,” said Nancy Brown, chief executive officer of the American Heart Association.  “It will take the collective efforts of everyone from community leaders to healthcare professionals, educators and business leaders to stop this No. 1 killer at the national and global level...” Read more on heart health.

New Guidelines for Stroke Risk, Prevention in Women
The American Heart Association/American Stroke Association has published the first ever set of guidelines dedicated to stroke risk and prevention in women. The 86-page document appears in the journal Stroke and address risk factors distinct to women, including pregnancy, oral contraceptives, menopause and hormone replacement. It also covers factors that affect women more than men, including atrial fibrillation and migraine with aura. “We reviewed a large body of research to be able to summarize our current understanding of stroke risk and stroke prevention in women, information that is critically important for care providers and researchers in the field,” according to Judith Lichtman, MD, associate professor at the Yale School of Public Health and co-author of the study. “The guidelines are also important to empower women and their families to better understand their risk for stroke and be aware of ways they can minimize their likelihood of having a one.” Strokes are the third-leading cause of death among women in the United States. Read more on strokes.

Study: Indicators of Potential Heart Disease as Early as Age 18
Indicators of potential heart disease can be seen as early as age 18, according to a long-term study recently published in the Journal of the American Medical Association. Researchers found that elevated blood pressure at that age, as well as found distinct blood pressure patterns from ages 18-55, indicate people at high risk for calcification of coronary arteries by middle age. “This shows that your blood pressure in young adulthood can impact your risk for heart disease later in life,” said Norrina Allen, PhD, lead study author and assistant professor of Preventive Medicine at Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, in a release. “We can’t wait until middle age to address it. If we can prevent their blood pressure from increasing earlier in life we can reduce their risk of future heart attacks and stroke.” Approximately one in three U.S. adults have hypertension. Read more on prevention.