Category Archives: Cancer

Mar 7 2014
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Public Health News Roundup: March 7

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CDC: Reducing High-risk Antibiotic Prescriptions Could Also Reduce Deadly Infections
The most recent Vital Signs report from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) finds that if prescriptions of high-risk antibiotics in hospitals were reduced by just 30 percent, then there could be as many as 26 fewer cases of deadly diarrhea infections with Clostridium difficile. “Improving antibiotic prescribing can save today’s patients from deadly infections and protect lifesaving antibiotics for tomorrow’s patients,” said CDC Director Tom Frieden, MD, MPH. “Health care facilities are an important part of the solution to drug resistance and every hospital in the country should have a strong antibiotic stewardship program.” As part of its ongoing efforts to improve antibiotic prescribing, the CDC has release a checklist of seven core elements for hospitals:

  1. Leadership commitment: Dedicate the necessary human, financial, and IT resources.
  2. Accountability: Appoint a single leader responsible for program outcomes. Physicians have proven successful in this role.
  3. Drug expertise: Appoint a single pharmacist leader to support improved prescribing.
  4. Act: Take at least one prescribing improvement action, such as requiring reassessment of prescriptions within 48 hours to check drug choice, dose, and duration.
  5. Track: Monitor prescribing and antibiotic resistance patterns.
  6. Report: Regularly report prescribing and resistance information to clinicians.
  7. Educate: Offer education about antibiotic resistance and improving prescribing practices.

Read more on infectious diseases.

Poorer Women Most Likely to Be Caught in ‘Vicious’ Caregiving, Financial Well-being Cycle
Low-income women are at increased risk of finding themselves caught in a “vicious cycle” of parental caregiving and financial well-being, according to a new study in The Journals of Gerontology. While women of better financial means can afford additional caregiver assistance and better health care for aging parents, poorer women lack those options. "People who had less household income and less financial resources were more likely to take care of their parents so there is this cycle that they cannot get out of—they are poor, then taking care of parents, then being poor and taking care of their parents—there's this kind of cycle," said lead author Yeonjung Lee, a researcher and professor at the Faculty of Social Work at the University of Calgary in Alberta, Canada, according to Reuters. Read more on aging.

Young Skin Cancer Survivors at Heightened Risk for Other Cancers
Younger skin cancer survivors are at increased risk for additional cancer types later in life, according to a new study in the journal Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers & Prevention. A review of data of more than 500,000 people with a history of nonmelanoma skin cancer found that while all age groups were at heightened risk for melanoma and other types of cancers, the increase was especially significant for people under the age of 25, who were 23 times more likely to develop cancer than people who had never had nonmelanoma cancer. The risk was 3.5 times higher for nonmelanoma survivors ages 25-44, 1.74 times higher for those ages 45-59 and 1.32 times higher for those older than 60. The types of cancer they are at risk for include melanoma skin cancer, and cancers of the breast, colon, bladder, liver, lung, brain, prostate, stomach and pancreas. Read more on cancer.

Mar 4 2014
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NewPublicHealth Q&A: Clifford A. Hudis, MD, American Society of Clinical Oncology

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Several leading cancer organizations recently formed a think tank to address health disparities in cancer research with the goal of improving treatment access and outcomes for underserved populations. “Closing the inequality gap will not happen easily, and won’t get done if any of us goes it alone," said Otis W. Brawley, MD, chief medical officer of the American Cancer Society (ACS), one of four groups involved, in addition to the American Association for Cancer Research (AACR); the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO); and the National Cancer Institute (NCI), a branch of the National Institutes of Health (NIH).

“Cancer mortality rates are decreasing for most minorities, but absolute death rates continue to be higher," said NCI Deputy Director Doug Lowy, MD. Lowy adds that it’s  important to understand the sources of the disparities in order to reduce them.

The goal of the collaboration is to address the fact that that some racial and ethnic minorities in the United States are more likely to develop cancer, less likely to access high-quality cancer care and more likely to die from cancer when compared to others and to whites. For example, the death rate for cancer among African-American males is 33 percent higher than among white males, and the rate for African-American females is 16 percent higher than it is for white females.

“We must move from describing the problems to more quickly identifying and implementing solutions to address the racial and economic-based disparities that continue to affect many cancer patients and families in the United States,” said ASCO president Clifford A. Hudis, MD.

NewPublicHealth recently spoke with Hudis about the new collaboration.

NewPublicHealth: What key issues help explain—and then overcome—differences in cancer incidence and severity among different populations?

Clifford A. Hudis: We can’t completely disentangle environmental factors, which include nutrition, access to care, general health behaviors, exercise and education, which relates to behaviors such as tobacco use. And of course underlying that is the socioeconomic status. But there also is a burgeoning understanding of the role of genetic variations that may be clustered in various populations and may influence things such as drug metabolism and diseases.

Read more

Feb 17 2014
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Public Health News Roundup: February 17

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Study: Increasing Young Men’s Knowledge of Emergency Contraception Could Increase Access, Use
Increasing young men’s knowledge of emergency contraception could increase access to the drug and help prevent unwanted pregnancies, according to a new study in Journal of Family Planning and Reproductive Health Care. Emergency contraception, commonly known as "the morning after pill," prevents pregnancy after unprotected sex or when other methods of contraception fail. Nine U.S. states allow pharmacists to dispense emergency contraception without a prescription under certain conditions. The study gauged the knowledge of 101 males and 97 females ages 18 to in 2008 and 2009. "About half of the women understood basic facts about emergency contraception, how you get it, how you use it, and the fact that male partners were also able to buy it over-the-counter for their female partners," said Sheree Schrager, a member of the study team and a researcher at Children's Hospital Los Angeles, California. “But young men had significantly lower knowledge then the young women did, and this is an opportunity for providers to reach out to young men in the hopes of reaching more young women to use emergency contraception.” According to the researchers, unplanned pregnancies are more common in poor communities, where there are also greater health and economic consequences. Read more on sexual health.

U.S., Global Partners to Joint in Prevention, Detection and Response to Infectious Disease
The United States has joined with 26 countries and other global partners to, over the next five years, work to prevent, detect and effectively respond to naturally occurring, accidental and intentional infectious disease threats. Additional partners in the Global Health Security Agenda include the World Health Organization (WHO), the Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) and the World Organization for Animal Health (OIE). “While we have made great progress in fighting and treating diseases, biological threats can emerge anywhere, travel quickly, and take lives,” said Lisa Monaco, Assistant to the President for Homeland Security and Counterterrorism.  “The recent outbreaks of H7N9 influenza and Middle East Respiratory Syndrome are reminders of the need to step up our efforts as a global community. The Global Health Security Agenda is about accelerating progress toward a world safe and secure from infectious disease threats.” The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has pledged $40 million in FY 2014 to advancing Global Health Security Agenda objectives, and its FY 2015 budget will include an additional $45 million to prevent avoidable catastrophes, detect threats early and mobilize effective responses to contain outbreaks. Read more on global health.

CDC: States with Indoor Tanning Laws See Far Less Use by Female High School Students
States with indoor tanning laws—especially those requiring parental permission or setting age restrictions—see lower rates of indoor tanning by female high school students, according to a new study in the American Journal of Public Health. The study was conducted by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Studies have connected the increased exposure to ultraviolet radiation from indoor tanning to increased risk of melanoma; each year the United States sees 60,000 new melanoma diagnoses and approximately 3.5 million treatments for nonmelanoma skin cancer. The study determined that the odds of female students engaging in indoor tanning in states with any indoor tanning laws were 30 percent less than those in states without such laws, and that the odds in states with systems access, parental permission and age restriction laws were 42 percent less than those in states without any laws. “State indoor tanning laws, especially age restrictions, may be effective in reducing indoor tanning among our nation’s youth,” said Gery Guy, PhD, health economist and the study’s lead author. “We need to address the harms of indoor tanning, especially among children. Indoor tanning laws can be part of a comprehensive effort to prevent skin cancers and change social norms around tanned skin.” Read more on cancer.

Feb 14 2014
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Public Health News Roundup: February 14

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Public Health Wants to be Your Valentine

Looking for powerful ways to save I love you?

Read more on heart health.

American Society of Clinical Oncology Weighs in on Mammography
In response to a study published this week in the British Medical Journal which called into question the benefit of mammography, the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) issued a statement today saying that because mammography is similar to many other tests that can detect a condition that may never cause harm, the benefits of screening are likely to be greater for women who are at increased risk of developing breast cancer based on factors such as age and family history, than for women at average risk. It also stated no single study should be used to change screening policy and that all women should be encouraged to speak with their doctors about their personal risk for breast cancer, as well as the potential benefits and harms of mammography screening. ASCO and other cancer advocacy and women’s health groups have announced that they will be monitoring additional mammography studies now being conducted, and the American Cancer Society is expected to release new mammography recommendations later this year. Read more on cancer.

NHTSA Announces New Mandatory Label to Help Owners Instantly Identify Recall Mailings
The U.S. Department of Transportation’s National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) today announced that starting February 18, all manufacturers must use a distinctive label on the agency’s required mailings that notify owners of recalled vehicles or equipment.

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The requirement was introduced to help owners instantly distinguish important recall notices arriving in their mailboxes from other mail and hopefully avoid mistakenly discarding the safety notices. NHTSA has also just launched the SaferCar app for Android devices that will provide information for car owners and shoppers, including recalls and safety performance. There is already a SaferCar app for iPhone, iPad and iPod Touch users. Other safety notification options from NHTSA include:

  • Register Your Cars, Tires and Car Seats: Receive NHTSA email notifications when there is a recall by the federal government. There is no way to locate or notify individual owners of car seats or tires if the product is not registered with the manufacturer or NHTSA.
    Check for Open Recalls on Used Cars: Verify with the previous owner or dealer whether a used car has been fixed by using www.safercar.gov, which provides a general search tool to help consumers identify recalls that may affect their vehicle.

Read more on transportation.

Feb 10 2014
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Public Health News Roundup: February 10

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Minimum Alcohol Prices Could Help Low-income, High-risk Drinkers
Setting a minimum price for alcohol would have a positive impact on low-income, high-risk drinkers, but little effect on low-income, moderate drinkers, according to a new study in The Lancet. British researchers at the University of Sheffield utilized a computer model to assess the impact of a 73 cents per unit of alcohol minimum on different demographics, finding it would have the greatest positive impact—reducing the amount of alcohol consumption—on the 5 percent of the population defined as high-risk drinkers. "Our study finds no evidence to support the concerns highlighted by government and the alcohol industry that minimum unit pricing would penalize responsible drinkers on low incomes,” said study co-author Petra Meier, director of the Sheffield Alcohol Research Group. “Instead, minimum unit pricing is a policy that is targeted at those who consume large quantities of cheap alcohol. By significantly lowering rates of ill health and premature deaths in this group, it is likely to contribute to the reduction of health inequalities." Read more on alcohol.

Smoking Linked to Most Common Type of Breast Cancer
Adding yet another health risk to the use of tobacco, smoking is linked to an increased risk for the most common type of breast cancer, according to a new study in the journal Cancer. Researchers at the Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center in Seattle conducted a population-based study of 778 patients, ages 20-44, with estrogen receptor positive breast cancer (the most common type) and 182 patients with triple-negative breast cancer; there were 938 cancer-free controls. They found that women who were current or recent smokers and had been smoking a pack a day for at least 10 years had a 60 percent increased risk of estrogen receptor positive breast cancer. "The health hazards associated with smoking are numerous and well known. This study adds to our knowledge in suggesting that with respect to breast cancer, smoking may increase the risk of the most common molecular subtype of breast cancer but not influence risk of one of the rarer, more aggressive subtypes," said Christopher Li, MD, PhD. Read more on cancer.

Low Testosterone Drugs Can Double Heart Attack Risk in Some Men
Ads asking men about their “low T”—or low testosterone levels—have become so common of late that in 2013 sales of the testosterone gel Androgel exceeded those of Viagra. However, a recent study indicates that men under the age of 65 with a history of heart disease see their heart attack risk double shortly after beginning testosterone therapy. The joint study from the UCLA Fielding School of Public Health, the National Institutes of Health and Consolidated Research Inc. appears in the journal PLOS ONE. Researchers decided to perform this larger study after three smaller studies raised concerns about the connection. "We decided to investigate cardiovascular risks of this therapy in a large health care database since these previous studies were modest in size and only focused on men 65 and older," said the study's senior author, Sander Greenland, MD, a professor of epidemiology at the UCLA Fielding School of Public Health and a professor of statistics in the UCLA College of Letters and Science. "Our study allowed us to examine cardiovascular risk in men under the age of 65 and to replicate the findings in men over 65." Read more on heart health.

Jan 30 2014
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Public Health News Roundup: January 30

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CDC Report Details Support of State, Local Health Responses
The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has released a new report detailing its support of state and local public health responses from 2012 to 2013, as well as assessments of all state and select local public health preparedness. The 2013-2014 National Snapshot of Public Health Preparedness is the sixth annual report from CDC’s Office of Public Health Preparedness and Response. “The lives protected by the public health response to Hurricane Sandy, the fungal meningitis outbreak, and the tornadoes in Joplin are just a few examples of how communities and CDC can work together to protect the public's health when its needed most,” said CDC Director Tom Frieden, MD, MPH.

Among the report’s highlights:

  • During outbreaks and emergencies, response time is essential. In 2012, lead state responders reported for immediate duty within 27 minutes of receiving notification of a potential public health emergency—9 minutes faster than the 2011 national average.
  • In 2012, across the 62 Public Health Emergency Preparedness (PHEP) cooperative agreement awardees, Emergence Management Program (EMP) activities included 185 engagements and 204 exercises. Internationally, EMP activities across 35 countries included 15 activations, 19 engagements, and 12 exercises.
  • The percentage of E. coli-positive tests analyzed and entered into the PulseNet database within four working days increased from 90 percent to 94 percent and timely testing and reporting of Listeria-positive results increased from 88 percent to 92 percent.

“The ability of our local and state health departments to be innovative and maintain a steady level of preparedness despite extensive budget cuts is reassuring,” said Ali Khan, M.D., M. P. H., director CDC’s Office of Public Health Preparedness and Response. “However, preventing an erosion of our nation’s health security will be difficult in the current fiscal environment.” Read more on preparedness.

Study: Overweight Kindergarteners Four Times as Likely to Be Overweight Teens
Children who are overweight at the age of five are four times as likely to be obese by the age of 14 than are children who start their school years at an average weight, according to a new study in the New England Journal of Medicine. Approximately 27 percent of the five-year-olds in the study were overweight. Using data on almost 8,000 children gathered by the Early Childhood Longitudinal Study conducted by the U.S. National Center for Education Statistics, researchers determined that:

  • Approximately 32 percent of kids who were overweight when they entered kindergarten had become obese by age 14, compared to 8 percent of normal-weight kindergarteners.
  • The obesity rate rose most rapidly between first and third grades—from 13 percent to almost 19 percent—but not significantly between fifth and eighth grades.
  • Between kindergarten and eighth grade, the prevalence of obesity rose by 65 percent among white children, 50 percent among Hispanic children and more than doubled among black children.

"If we're just focused on improving weight when kids are adolescents, it may not have as much of an impact as focusing on the preschool-age years," said lead researcher Solveig Cunningham of Emory University, adding that the study "doesn't tell us what to do about it, but it helps tell us when we need to think creatively about what to do." Read more on obesity.

Study: One-third of Americans, Two-Thirds of University Students Have Used Indoor Tanning
Despite clear and widespread data on their link to skin cancer risk, more than a third of Americans and nearly two-thirds of U.S. university students have used indoor tanning, according to a new study in the journal JAMA Dermatology. Approximately 19 percent of teens had also used the machines. Researchers at the University of California, San Francisco based their conclusions on an analysis of 88 surveys covering more than 406,000 people in the United States, Europe and Australia. "It is appalling how often exposure to indoor tanning takes place in presumably educated populations and particularly worrisome that we allow adolescents to be exposed to this carcinogen," said Mark Lebwohl, MD, chairman of the department of dermatology at Mount Sinai Hospital in New York City. "We must do a much better job at educating people of all ages about the risks of indoor tanning.” Read more on cancer.

Jan 22 2014
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Public Health News Roundup: January 22

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Survey: Latinos See Diabetes as Greatest Family Health Concern
A new NPR/Robert Wood Johnson Foundation/Harvard School of Public Health poll found that Latinos see diabetes as the biggest health concern for their families. Almost 19 percent of Latinos surveyed cited diabetes as the top worry, including across both immigrant (19 percent) and non-immigrant (22 percent) populations. Cancer, at 5 percent, was the second-biggest concern. In addition to health and health care, the poll also asked about communities, financial situation and discrimination. According to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Hispanic adults are 1.7 percent more likely than non-Hispanic whites to be diagnosed with diabetes, and 1.5 percent more likely to die from it. Read more on health disparities.

Heart Attack Patients in ER Off-Hours Seeing Higher Mortality Rates
Heart attack patients who present during off-hours—at night and on weekends—are more likely to die, according to a new study from the journal BMJ. Their emergency care is also more likely to take longer than it would during normal hospital hours, including inflation of the coronary artery, which can take an additional 15 minutes. After analyzed records on 1,896,859 patients, researchers at the Mayo Clinic determined that heart attack patients who present during off-hours had a 5 percent relative increase in mortality—or an additional 6,000 U.S. deaths. The study’s authors concluded that emergency departments "should focus on improving their off-hour care, with the goal of providing consistently high quality care 24 hours a day and seven days a week." Read more on heart health.

Study: HPV Vaccination Rate Remains Low, More Physician Recommendations Needed
Only 14.5 percent of girls ages 11 and 12 have received at least one does of the human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination, with only 3 percent having completed a three-dose series, according to a new study in the American Journal of Preventive Medicine. The study from the Moffitt Cancer Center indicates that increasing the rate of physician recommendations, which so far remains low, could do much to up the vaccination rate and cut the risk of cancer. The vaccination protects against the two types of HPV that cause 70 percent of cervical cancer cases. “This study demonstrates that the change in consistent HPV vaccine recommendations to early adolescent females was modest, and for older adolescent females was virtually nonexistent, from three to five years after the vaccine became available,” explained Susan T. Vadaparampil, PhD, MPH, associate member of the Health Outcomes and Behavior Program at Moffitt. “Physician recommendation is central to increasing HPV vaccination rates because it is one of the most important predictors of whether a patient gets the HPV vaccine.” Read more on cancer.

Jan 10 2014
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Public Health News Roundup: January 10

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U.S. Lung Cancer Rates Dropping for Both Men and Women
The rate of new lung cancer cases decreased among men and women in the United States from 2005 to 2009, according to a new report from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), with the fastest drop among adults aged 35-44 years. The rate of decrease has been 6.5 percent per year among men and 5.8 percent per year among women. Lung cancer incidence rates decreased more rapidly among men than among women in all age groups. “These dramatic declines in the number of young adults with lung cancer show that tobacco prevention and control programs work—when they are applied,” said CDC Director Tom Frieden, MD, MPH. Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer death and the second most commonly diagnosed cancer among both men and women in the United States, with most lung cancers attributable to cigarette smoking and secondhand smoke. Because smoking behaviors among women are now similar to those among men, women are now experiencing the same risk of lung cancer as men, according to the CDC. Read more on tobacco.

DOT to Fund New Low or No Emission Buses
The U.S. Department of Transportation (DOT) has announced funding of close to $25 million to help fund non-polluting buses in communities across the country. The funds will be awarded competitively to transit agencies and state transportation departments working either independently or jointly with bus manufacturers already making low- and zero-emission buses. According to the DOT, in addition to the environmental benefits, the new buses will also save money for transportation agencies because they can more than double the fuel economy of buses that run on diesel and other fuels. Read more on transportation.

Assistance for Paying Heat Costs
The polar vortex deep freeze much of the country experienced this past week is ending, but there are still many more weeks left of winter. People having trouble paying for heating costs can contact the National Energy Assistance Referral project at: 1-866-674-6327, e-mail energy@ncat.org or access the LIHEAP website to find out where to apply for help to pay for heating costs. Read more on community health.

Jan 8 2014
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Public Health News Roundup: January 8

Survey: Half of U.S. Adult Smokers Plan to Quit for New Year
More than half of adult smokers in the United States made quitting tobacco a New Year’s resolution for 2014, according to a new survey from Legacy, a national public health nonprofit. These findings are especially significant today, on the eighth day of the new year, as the eighth day of a quit attempt is when a smoker is most vulnerable to a relapse. This month also marks the 50th anniversary of the first Surgeon General’s report on tobacco. Among the survey’s other findings:

  • 41 percent planned to quit smoking "cold turkey" for New Years, which is largely ineffective for the majority of smokers
  • 12 percent planned to switch to electronic cigarettes, an unregulated product whose safety risks remain unknown
  • 37 percent plan to quit to save money
  • 31.7 percent want to quit because they don’t want their clothes and hair to smell

Read more on tobacco.

ACS: Cancer Death Rates Fell 20 Percent Over Two Decades
The combined cancer death rate for men and women fell 20 percent in the two decades from 1991 to 2010, with better prevention, screening and treatment critical to continuing this positive trend, according to a new report from the American Cancer Society. The drop translates to approximately 1,350,400 fewer deaths. The report estimates that the United States will see a total of 1,665,540 new cancer cases and 585,720 deaths from cancer in 2014. From 2006 to 2010, cancer death rates decreased by 1.8 percent annually in men and by 1.4 percent in women. Lung, colon, prostate and breast cancers are the most common causes of cancer death, with lung cancer accounting for approximately one in four deaths. Read more on cancer.

‘Green’ Labels for Healthy, ‘Red’ for Unhealthy Foods Improve Nutritional Selections
The “stop” and “go” colors of traffic signals may be able to improve healthy eating choices in cafeterias, according to a new study in the American Journal of Preventive Medicine. A redesign of the cafeteria at Massachusetts General Hospital combined better locations for health food items with red, yellow and green labels marking the nutritional quality of different foods, with junk foods being red. Over two years, green-labeled items sold at a 12 percent higher rate and sales of red-labeled items dropped by 20 percent. "Our current results show that the significant changes in the purchase patterns...did not fade away as cafeteria patrons became used to them," said study lead author Anne Thorndike, MD, of the division of general medicine at the Boston hospital. "This is good evidence that these changes in healthy choices persist over time." To learn more about the study and concept, go to "Traffic-Light Labels and Choice Architecture: Promoting Healthy Food Choices" at RWJF.org. Read more on nutrition.

Dec 4 2013
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Public Health News Roundup: December 4

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NHTSA: Motorcoaches, Large Buses to Require Seatbelts for All Passengers and Driver
New motorcoaches and large buses will be required to provide lap and shoulder seatbelts for all passengers and driver, under a new rule issued by the U.S. Department of Transportation's National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA). While the buses are an overall safe way to travel, the large numbers of people they carry and the high speeds at which they travel mean a single collision can lead to a significant number of injuries, according to NHTSA. An average of 7,934 riders are injured each year in motorcoaches, and an average of 21 passengers are killed. "Buckling up is the most effective way to prevent deaths and injuries in all vehicular crashes, including motorcoaches," said Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administrator Anne S. Ferro, in a release. "Requiring seat belts in new models is another strong step we are taking to reach an even higher level of safety for bus passengers." The rule will apply to buses with a gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) greater than 26,000 pounds,) excluding transit buses and school buses. Read more on transportation.

Study: Women With Breast Cancer Should Get Mammograms Every 12 to 18 Months
Breast cancer patients should undergo mammograms every 12 to 18 months to determine whether their cancer has spread to the lymph nodes, according to a new study to be presented today at the annual meeting of the Radiological Society of North America. Study researcher Lilian Wang, MD, evaluated more than 300 women who were diagnosed with breast cancer because of a routine mammogram, dividing them into three groups based on their treatment history. She found that only 9 percent of the women who had 12- to 18-month intervals between mammograms saw their cancer spread to their lymph nodes; the rates were 21 percent for those who waited one-and-a-half to three years and 15 percent for those who waited three or more years. "If you catch someone with early stage cancer, they are going to need less extensive surgery, and maybe no chemo," said Laura Kruper, MD, director of the Cooper-Finkel Women's Health Center at the City of Hope Cancer Center, in Duarte, Calif., who was not a part of the study. "[The new study] adds more power behind the fact that we do need screening mammograms starting at age 40 and every year.” Read more on cancer.

FDA: Certain HeartStart AEDs May Not Work During Cardiac Emergencies
The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) announced yesterday that certain automated external defibrillator (AED) devices made by Philips Medical Systems may not function properly when needed. In a new safety communication, FDA revealed that the devices may not deliver the needed shock to restore normal heart rhythm during a cardiac emergency. “The FDA advises keeping all recalled HeartStart AEDs in service until you obtain a replacement from Philips Healthcare or another AED manufacturer, even if the device indicates it has detected an error during a self-test,” said Steve Silverman, director of the Office of Compliance in the FDA’s Center for Devices and Radiological Health. “Despite current manufacturing and performance problems, the FDA considers the benefits of attempting to use an AED in a cardiac arrest emergency greater than the risk of not attempting to use the defibrillator.” Read more on heart health.