Category Archives: Washington (WA) P

Apr 22 2013
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Public Health Touches Everybody: Washington State's Mary Selecky on Accreditation

file Mary Selecky, director of the Washington State health department

NewPublicHealth is speaking with directors of several health departments who recently were accredited by the Public Health Accreditation Board. Eleven health departments received the credential so far. We recently spoke with Mary Selecky, director of the Washington State health department, one of the first two state health agencies receive national accreditation status. Ms. Selecky recently announced her plans to retire from the health department.

>>Also read our interview with Terry Cline, health commissioner of Oklahoma, which also was recently accredited by PHAB.

NPH: How do you think accreditation will improve delivery of public health services and care in Washington State? Now that the health department is accredited, do you feel as though you are leaving the department in even better shape than it was?

Mary Selecky: Accreditation is really a quality improvement tool, and the standards that have been set by the Public Health Accreditation Board force you to examine whether you have the right processes in place for continuous, sustained quality improvement. And if you have found that you are not quite up to par in an area, then the processes help you ask what you will do to improve your performance in that area? The process helps you increase your performance, your effectiveness, and your accountability.

Public health touches people every single day—everybody in the state, from the moment they get up until they go to bed at night and even while they’re sleeping. This credential shows us that we have effective programs and measures in place to meet the needs of our communities. Drinking water systems are a good example. We regulate 16,000 drinking water systems, and I have a lot of drinking water engineers who are out in communities checking on water systems. I have to know that they’ve got a common set of operating procedures to assure the public that we’re looking out for their interests and when they turn on their tap from a municipal water system, that the water’s safe to drink. You can only do that when you have some procedures in place and that goes for the engineers, for laboratories or programs to make sure they are operating well in the community. Accreditation touches every part of the department.

NPH: How will you be promoting and explaining accreditation to policymakers?  

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Nov 7 2012
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Transportation and Health: A Conversation With Seattle/King County Health Director

file On-street bike parking on 12th Avenue. Photo courtesy SDOT.

NewPublicHealth continues a series of conversations with local public health directors on the issues that impact their work and the health of their communities. Recently, we spoke with David Fleming, MD, MPH, public health director of Seattle and King County in Washington State. Dr. Fleming talked with us about how transportation innovation can impact the health and prosperity of a community.

>>Check out an INFOGRAPHIC on the connection between transportation and health.

>>Hear from Secretary of Transportation Ray LaHood on how transportation impacts public health.

NewPublicHealth: How is transportation innovation making a difference in the health of communities in Seattle/King County?

Dr. Fleming: We’ve started with transit-oriented development such as increasing bike and walking paths, which provides opportunities for physical exercise for many folks that want to do it, but haven’t been able to. It draws a larger number of people into activities and helps them exercise routinely. And in addition to increasing physical activity, you’re also increasing safety, reducing injuries, increasing the social capital in the community, getting better connections between community residents and from an economic development standpoint, you’re creating jobs and increasing property values, and therefore, improving one of the underlying social determinants of health.

NPH: What other examples of transit-oriented housing and community development can you tell us about in Seattle/ King County and what have you learned from them?

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Jul 11 2012
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NACCHO Q&A: John Wiesman

John Wiesman John Wiesman, NACCHO President and Director of Clark County Public Health Department in Washington State

On July 1, John Wiesman, Director of Clark County Public Health Department in Washington State became president of the National Association of County and City Health Officials (NACCHO), which is having its annual meeting in Los Angeles this week. NewPublicHealth spoke to Wiesman about his work in Clark County and his goals as president of NACCHO.

 >>Follow NewPublicHealth coverage of the NACCHO conference throughout the week.

NewPublicHealth: What are some health-related accomplishments in Clark County that might serve as models for other communities?

John Wiesman: I think we’ve done a number of important things in our county. We strategically transitioned out of clinical services and partnered with community organizations that could provide those services.

NPH: What were some of the advantages of that change?

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