Category Archives: Culture of Health

Nov 18 2014
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APHA 2014: A ReFreshing Collaboration is Building Better Health in New Orleans

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If we as a nation are to succeed in building a Culture of Health that benefits every individual, it will require collaboration across sectors, open communication among diverse organizations and a willingness to step out of traditional practices to find effective interventions.

On Monday, Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Vice President Michelle Larkin showcased one example of this innovative collaboration that is occurring on the edge of a low-income neighborhood in New Orleans, just a few miles away from this year’s American Public Health Association (APHA) annual meeting.

At the corner of North Broad Street and Bienville Avenue sits The ReFresh Project—an innovative fresh food hub located in a former warehouse that had been vacant since Hurricane Katrina struck the city nine years ago. Today the site is home to a Whole Foods Market, Liberty’s Kitchen, The Goldring Center for Culinary Medicine and an onsite farm.

The goal of the hub, according to project founder Jeffrey Schwartz, is to create new eating, working, exercise and community living cultures.

Each aspect of the Refresh Project is designed to realize these goals. 

WholeFoods The ReFresh Project in New Orleans, La.
  • At the Whole Foods market, which anchors the Refresh project development, products are specifically chosen to be both high quailty and affordable. Specifically, the store carries more store-line products and often has more sale items than other stores in the Whole Foods chain. Two healthy eating educators are also located on-site to answer questions, craft recipes, and host tours.
  • At Liberty’s Kitchen, a culinary work readiness and leadership program for at-risk youth, New Orleans youth ages 16-24 who are out of work and out of school are given an intensive and hands-on food service training, case management, job placement services and follow-up support. Ninety percent of Liberty’s Kitchen Youth Development Program participants are employed on graduation out of the program and 80 percent are still employed at the six-month benchmark, according to the organization.

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Nov 17 2014
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At APHA 2014 Opening Session, Key Leaders Talk Culture of Health

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Healthography—or the health of the place where you live—is the theme of this year’s American Public Health Association (APHA) annual meeting, which is taking place in New Orleans this week.

During the opening session, Georges Benjamin, MD, Executive Director of APHA, announced that APHA’s goal is to create the healthiest generation in American history within one generation. Benjamin’s announcement was coupled with announcements from local and national public health leaders that collectively took another step forward in that effort.

For example, the Partnership for a Healthier America announced a new Healthier Campus Initiative, which calls on colleges and universities to adopt recommended guidelines on food, nutrition and physical activity.

“We know that going to college is a time of change for many students—we also know that means it’s a time when new habits are formed,” said Peter Soler, the partnership’s CEO. “By creating healthier food and physical activity environments today, campuses and universities are encouraging healthier habits that will carry over into tomorrow.”

Guidelines being adopted by participating campuses include promoting the consumption of water instead of soda on campus, offering a bicycle sharing program for all students and providing certified personal trainers and registered dietitian nutritionists on campus.

In addition, Louisiana’s Secretary of Health and Hospitals, Kathy Kliebert, discussed the state’s “Well-Ahead” initiative, which promotes and recognizes smart choices that are made in the spaces and places where people live and work, and which make it easier to live healthier lives. Kliebert told the audience that Well-Ahead promotes voluntary changes without imposing new taxes or creating new rules.

Within the host city of New Orleans, a couple of initiatives to improve health within the Crescent City were also discussed at APHA’s opening session.

One such initiative to combat obesity—known as Fit Nola—now has 100 miles of bike lanes throughout the city. Also, next week legislation will be introduced to ban smoking in the city’s bars, casinos and public spaces.

APHA’s opening session ended with a talk by Pulitzer Prize winner Isabel Wilkerson, who spoke about her book “The Warmth of Other Suns.” A book 15 years in the making, “The Warm of Other Suns” describes the migration of African Americans in the 20th century from the South to the North for a better life for themselves and their children. For example, the parents of Olympian Jesse Owens worried their son would not have the strength to work in the fields, so they moved north to Cleveland, Ohio, where he started running track—a sport that would take him around the world and across the global stage.

Whether the generation of migrants profiled in Wilkerson’s book realized it, their stories epitomize the power of place, and the influence of geography on health, wellbeing and opportunity of every individual. 

>>Bonus Link: Also in attendance at yesterday’s opening session was Peter Salk, son of the world famous Jonas Salk, MD, who was on hand to accept a posthumous award from APHA for his father’s discovery of a vaccine for polio. Watch the trailer above for the film “The Shot Felt Round the World” to learn more about the elder Salk’s successful search for a cure.

Nov 13 2014
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BUILD: Going Upstream to Improve Community Health

Yesterday saw the launch of the BUILD Health Challenge, a national award program to create and improve partnerships among health systems, community-based organizations and local health departments with an aim of addressing upstream problems that impact the health of local residents.

On a webinar to announce the challenge yesterday, representatives of the founding partners of the challenge said they were embracing the challenge because “transforming health outcomes requires a coordinated effort to tackle such contributing factors as socio-economic conditions, transportation, housing, environmental issues and access to healthy food.” The evidence base underpinning the new initiative shows that partnerships among health systems, public health agencies and community organizations are the most effective ways to work toward that transformation.

The BUILD Health Challenge will award up to $7.5 million in both financial awards and low-interest loans over two years to support up to 14 community-driven efforts that take Bold, Upstream, Integrated, Local and Data-driven approaches to improving community health and promoting health equity.

BUILD’s partners include the Advisory Company, the deBeaumont Foundation, the Kresge Foundation and the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation.

>> Bonus Link: Read an FAQ about the Build Health Challenge.

Oct 17 2014
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Recommended Reading: Culture of Health Prize Winner Brownsville on Health Affairs

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Earlier this year, Brownsville, Tex., was chosen by the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation as a Culture of Health Prize winner for its efforts to improve community health. As part of a new ongoing series, Health Affairs blog has featured a piece by local Brownsville leader Belinda Reininger on the community’s health successes.

Brownsville is a mostly Spanish-speaking town on the Texas border. The community, which is home to approximately 180,000 people, is also among the poorest metropolitan areas in the country. Approximately 48 percent of its children live in poverty, 80 percent of its population is obese or overweight, 30 percent have diabetes and about 67 percent have no health insurance.

However, over the last decade it has also become a “robust, bike-friendly city” that also promotes health through community gardens and the world’s largest Zumba class, according to Reininger. This is thanks in large part to the University of Texas’ decision to open its School of Public Health in Brownsville and the formation of Community Advisory Board that brings together 200 people and organizations, from private citizens and elected officials to business executives and nonprofits.

The board’s members “carry the message of wellness into their homes and businesses, and they’re able to affect policy and environmental changes by voting and leadership—and that’s how we have been able to include the community, by engaging them every single step of the way,” said Reininger, DrPh, to NewPublicHealth earlier this year.

Brownsville’s efforts include:

  • Using data to assess the community’s health issues and then to engage with community members in a way that is both informative and beneficial to their health.
  • Creating diverse programs — from Brownsville in Motion to promote physical activity through safe access to trails and bike lanes, to the Brownsville Farmers’ Market and Community Garden—to address the relationships between health, poverty, education and the economy.

To learn more about Brownsville’s prize-winning efforts to improve public health, read the Health Affairs blog post.

>>Bonus Links: Learn more about the 2014 RWJF Culture of Health Prize winners and read NewPublicHealth coverage of the prize announcement.

>>Bonus Content: Watch a NewPublicHealth video on Brownsville's efforts to build a Culture of Health.

Sep 23 2014
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Recommended Reading: Culture of Health Prize Winner Taos Pueblo on Health Affairs

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Earlier this year, Taos Pueblo, N.M., was chosen by the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF) as a Culture of Health Prize winner for its efforts to improve community health by declaring self-governance. As part of a new ongoing series, Health Affairs blog has featured a piece by local Taos Pueblo leader Ezra Bayles on the community’s health successes.

Taos Pueblo is a National Historic Landmark where Native Americans have continuously lived for more than 1,000 years. Approximately 1,350 people call it the sovereign nation home. Despite its concerted efforts to keep its ancient oral language, culture and traditions alive, the community faces serious public health issues that are rooted in high rates of poverty and unemployment. Approximately 47 percent of pueblo youth under age 20 are overweight or obese and 21 percent of its adults have diabetes.

As a means to address these troubling issues, in 2007 the Taos Pueblo Tribal Council took steps toward self-governance, which allowed them to reorganize and streamline community services.

“We’ve taken on even more responsibility and are taking on the programs, functions and services to serve our people,” said Shawn Duran, Tribal Programs Administrator for Taos Pueblo, to NewPublicHealth earlier this year. “We’re finding solutions that we’re familiar with and turning that into programs that work for our people.”

Taos Pueblo’s efforts include:

  • Forming the Red Willow Community Growers Cooperative and the Red Willow Farmers Market in order to revive and celebrate the tribe’s agricultural heritage while also providing healthier food options.
  • Serving children ages 1 to 5 with the Taos Pueblo Head Start and My First School, which incorporates healthy eating while also instilling a strong sense of community.
  • Creating the Public Health Nursing Department, which sends a Native American nurse and two trained Community Health Workers directly to people’s doors as a way to make accessing care easier.

To learn more about Taos Pueblo’s prize-winning efforts to improve health, read the Health Affairs blog post.

>>Bonus Links: Learn more about the 2014 RWJF Culture of Health Prize winners and read NewPublicHealth coverage of the prize announcement.

>>Bonus Content: Watch a NewPublicHealth video on Taos Pueblo’s efforts to build a Culture of Health. 

Sep 5 2014
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Recommended Reading: Culture of Health Prize Winner Durham County on Health Affairs Blog

Earlier this year, Durham County, N.C., was chosen by the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF) as a Culture of Health Prize winner for its efforts to ensure that its most vulnerable residents have access to the county’s repository of world-class health resources, high-skilled jobs and places to exercise. As part of an ongoing series, Health Affairs blog has featured a piece by local Durham leader Erika Samoff on the community’s health successes.

While Durham is home to a wealth of health care resources—so much so that it’s been dubbed “The City of Medicine”—a 2004 health assessment found high rates of cardiovascular disease and other chronic conditions; HIV/AIDS and other sexually transmitted diseases; and infant mortality. In addition, a 2007 evaluation found that nearly one in three of Durham’s adults were obese, with the rate especially high in its African-American population, at 42 percent. Half of the adults surveyed pointed to a lack of opportunities for physical activity as a contributing factor to their condition.

County leaders responded to these findings by creating the Partnership for a Healthy Durham. It is an alliance of more than 150 nonprofits, hospitals, faith-based organizations and businesses. The partnership’s efforts include:

  • Turning an empty, run-down junior high school into the Holton Career & Resource Center, which offers mentoring programs, internships and hands-on career training to high school students
  • Creating new bike lanes, bike racks and sidewalks to encourage physical activity and help combat chronic obesity
  • Creating Project Access of Durham County to provide access to specialty care for uninsured residents
  • Passing smoke-free legislation

To learn more about Durham’s prize-winning efforts to improve health, read the Health Affairs blog post.

>>Bonus Links:

>>Bonus Content: Watch a NewPublicHealth video on Durham’s efforts to build a Culture of Health. 

Aug 21 2014
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Workplace Wellness: Q&A with Catherine M. Baase, The Dow Chemical Company

We’ve written extensively on NewPublicHealth on the importance of building a Culture of Health—an environment where everyone has access to opportunities to make healthy choices. In June, the Washington Post held a live forum—sponsored by the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation—titled “Health Beyond Health Care,” which looked at how creative minds in traditionally non-health fields are working together to build a Culture of Health in the United States. As part of our continuing coverage of this issue we spoke with Catherine M. Baase, MD, Chief Health Officer at The Dow Chemical Company, about workplace wellness programs.

file Catherine M. Baase, MD, Chief Health Officer at The Dow Chemical Company

NewPublicHealth: Why do you think workplace wellness is important?

Catherine Baase: I guess it depends on “important” in what way. I’ll tell you two things. One is if you were asking me why it’s important to a business or a corporation, I think it brings critical value to many different corporate priorities—things such as safety, human capital priorities such as attracting and retaining talent, manufacturing reliability, the capacity to positively impact health care costs. So there’s a landscape of corporate priorities where the achievement of healthy people is important, even including drug satisfaction and employee engagement.

But on another lens, I would say that I think workplace wellness is important to society for the achievement of public health objectives. The fact that we’re not doing really well on the achievement of health outcomes for our population as a whole, and the achievement of improved health will depend on a variety of sectors of society getting involved, and one of them is workplaces. Others are schools and communities and things like that, but the achievement of public health objectives depends a bit on workplaces being involved, as well.

NPH: Who is it that benefits from workplace wellness?

Baase: Well I think the individuals, the employees and oftentimes their families, because a lot of workplace wellness programs either directly or indirectly impact the family. It’s the community within which folks live because the culture is impacted, and the company certainly.

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Aug 20 2014
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Recommended Reading: RWJF Culture of Health Prize Winner Spokane County on Health Affairs Blog

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Earlier this year, Spokane County, Wash.,was chosen by the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF) as a Culture of Health Prize winner for its efforts to improve community health by increasing graduation rates. As part of a new ongoing series, Health Affairs blog has featured a piece by local Spokane leader Ben Smith on the community’s health successes.

Just eight years ago, the high school graduation rate for Spokane Public Schools was below 60 percent and 18 percent of the county’s students lived in poverty. In addition, the students who did attend college or technical school often failed to earn their degree, leaving them unprepared to fill available positions in the county’s more technical fields.

To address these issues, Priority Spokane emerged from a collaboration of local businesses, educators, health organizations and community nonprofits—all committed to improving the future of Spokane County residents by improving education. A report linking lack of education to poorer health helped spur a dramatic change. Over the next several years, the county emphasized increased collaboration and a clear vision to improve the high school graduation rate to 79.5 percent overall.

Spokane County’s efforts include:

  • Training teachers and childcare workers to mentor children who experience traumatic home events.
  • Developing an early warning system for at-risk students.
  • Establishing community attendance support teams that reengage truant students in school.
  • Starting Spokane Valley Tech, a high school designed to help students build careers in science, technology, engineering and math.

To learn more about Spokane’s prize-winning efforts to improve health, read the Health Affairs blog post.

>>Bonus Links: Learn more about the 2014 RWJF Culture of Health Prize winners and read NewPublicHealth coverage of the prize announcement.

>>Bonus Content: Watch a NewPublicHealth video on Spokane's efforts to build a Culture of Health.

 

Aug 19 2014
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Google Hangout Convenes Culture of Health Prize Winners to Discuss Lessons Learned in Creating Healthy Communities

This past June, the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF) announced the six winners of its 2014 Culture of Health Prize, which honors communities that place a high priority on health and bring partners together to drive local change. Each community, selected from more than 250 across the nation, received a no-strings-attached $25,000 cash prize in recognition of their accomplishments.  

Last week, RWJF brought together representatives from two of this year’s winners and one from last year in an online discussion, “Building a Culture of Health: What Does it Take?” Each community representative spoke about the barriers they’ve faced, how they overcame them and the role partnerships play in their ongoing success.

The discussion was moderated by Julie Willems Van Dijk, co-director of the RWJF County Health Rankings & Roadmaps and director of the RWJF Culture of Health Prize.

Alisa May, executive director of Priority Spokane and representing 2014 winner Spokane County, Wash., said that as a largely rural community of 210,000 people they’ve placed an emphasis on improving education at all levels. And they took a data-centric approach.

“Priority Spokane—which is a collaboration of community leaders—looked at the data, pulled community members together to talk about the issues that were most important to them, and educational attainment rose to the surface,” said May.

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Aug 13 2014
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The Mission of Public Health: Q&A with David Fleming, Seattle and King County in Washington State

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This week, David Fleming, MD, MPH, stepped down as public health director of Seattle and King County in Washington State after seven years leading the public health agency. Over that period, among many other accomplishments, he led the department’s efforts to sign up more than 165,000 residents under the Affordable Care Act and oversaw a 17 percent drop in obesity rates in partnering schools.

NewPublicHealth spoke with Fleming about his views on the mission of public health.

NPH: How has public health changed since you began your career?

David Fleming: The mission of public health has not changed—and that's to prevent unnecessary illness and death—but what has been changing is what the nature of that prevention is. Increasingly, it is in chronic diseases, injuries and, importantly, the driving force of underlying social determinants of health. So public health has changed from being more of a direct service agency where we have frontline public health workers who are out there providing treatment to people and preventing infectious diseases, to really more of a collaborative kind of agency where we need to be working with a wide range of partners outside of the traditional domains of public health to help them implement the changes that need to happen. It's a fundamental shift, I think, in the business model of public health that we're in the process of witnessing today.

NPH: When you point to some of the achievements that you've had, whether they're specific changes in the state or specific models of examples that you've given to other states, what would you point to?

Fleming: First off, I think it's important to say that public health is a team sport, and so when I talk about accomplishments, I'm talking about accomplishments of the department in which I work on this and the staff that work here. I think that we have been successful at pivoting to that future that we were talking about a moment ago, at looking at how health departments can attack the underlying social determinants of health.

Increasingly, it is health disparities that are driving poor health in this country. We have been successful here in beginning to figure out how to partner with other sectors—the education sector to reduce obesity in our poorest school districts, for example. We’ve also worked with the community development sector to begin making investments in our poorest neighborhoods to increase the healthiness of our communities, so that people who live in them can be healthy, as well. At the end of the day, I think that we have been trying to lead this new path where public health is a partner in communities with all of the other entities that are capable of influencing health and figuring out how to make that happen.

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