Category Archives: Culture of Health

Jul 23 2014
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TEDMED Great Challenges: A Candid Conversation About Childhood Obesity

A 2012 report from the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF) and Trust for America’s Health concluded that if the adult and childhood obesity rates in 2011 continued to increase at their steady paces, then by 2030 nearly two-thirds of U.S. adults would be obese and every single state would have obesity rates above 44 percent.

Data now show that childhood obesity rates have stabilized. In fact, for the first time in a decade the obesity rates among young children from low-income families in many states is trending down.

Helping lead the way in this important public health issue has been the city of Philadelphia, Penn., which has worked to improve access to healthy foods and opportunities for physical activity.

“We were very fortunate in Philadelphia to have colleagues...who have developed a better understanding of childhood obesity,” said Don Schwarz, former Health Commissioner and Deputy Mayor for Health and Opportunity, City of Philadelphia, and will also soon take on the role of director for RWJF’s Demand Team. “What that has meant is that Philadelphia was able to take a body of knowledge and bring it to scale. The partnership in Philadelphia that has allowed that to happen goes across government and between government and the private sector and community organizations—just everyday Philadelphians. So that kind of partnership, that wonderful knowledge base, has I believed turned the corner on childhood obesity, particularly for children who are of disadvantaged communities.”

Schwarz’s comments came during the Tuesday, July 22 Google Hangout TEDMED Great Challenges: A Candid Conversation About Childhood Obesity. The panel was moderated by Richard Besser, Chief Health and Medical Editor for ABC News.

Every member of the panel echoed the importance of partnerships, and Besser succinctly explained their critical role in not just obesity prevention but all public health efforts.

“The more creatively you can think and the wider variety of partners you can pull in, the more likely you are to be successful,” he said.

At the heart of Philadelphia’s success has been the important role that schools play in that community partnership. According to Schwarz, for the past decade the city’s schools have worked to reshape how they approach children’s health and wellbeing, including comprehensive nutrition policies, a new food environment that emphasizes healthy choices and more opportunities for kids to be physically active. One can’t be successful without the other.

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Jul 17 2014
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2014 RWJF Culture of Health Prizes — Celebrating Communities’ Innovative Public Health Efforts

Building a Culture of Health means building a society where getting healthy and staying healthy is a fundamental and guiding social value that helps define American culture...and it’s a mission that communities across the country are eagerly taking on. They include the six communities honored by this year’s Culture of Health prizes from the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF), who are coming together today and tomorrow at RWJF’s Princeton, N.J. campus to celebrate their efforts and share the lessons learned. Picked from more than 250 submissions, these six communities are leading some of the nation’s most innovative public health efforts. 

The RWJF Culture of Health Prize was launched to further the work of the County Healthy Rankings & Roadmaps program, which aims to educate the public and policy makers on the multiple factors that influence community health—such as education, economic conditions and the physical environment—and to provide solutions that will improve community health. The prizes honor communities that place a high priority on health and bring partners together to drive local change.

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Jun 27 2014
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Aspen Ideas Festival: Communities That Thrive

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This Thursday at Spotlight: Health, the two-and-a-half day extension of the Aspen Ideas Festival, a number of speakers discussed the many facets that are integral to building a community that thrives. Speakers included Kennedy Odede, the Co-Founder, President and CEO of Shining Hope for Communities; Belinda Reininger, Associate Professor of Health Promotion and Behavioral Science and the University of Texas School of Public Health; Gabe Klein, Senior Visiting Fellow at the Urban Land Institute; and Gina Murdock, Founder and Director of the Aspen Yoga Society.

Although the communities they serve and the work they do vary greatly, all four presenters agreed on four key themes:

  1. The importance of listening to the community
  2. Working with the residents, rather than over their heads, to create what they believe will be a thriving place to live
  3. Measuring outcomes
  4. Setting goals

To the first theme, Odede explained that “people in the community must be ready for change and we can’t import it.” Growing up in Kenya’s Kiberia Slum, Odede went on to found Shining Hope For Communities—an organization that combats gender inequality and extreme poverty in urban slums by linking free schools for girls to holistic community services for all. By connecting these services with a school for girls, Odede and Shining Hope for Communities show that benefiting women has a positive impact on the entire community. The organization’s model relies on community input and solutions.

In Brownsville, Texas, a family-oriented town requires a family-oriented approach to improving health. Sitting in one of the poorest metro areas in the nation, the town is known for its low graduation rates and high prevalence of obesity and diabetes. However, the community had a goal of being one of the healthiest areas in the state and began chipping away at the obstacles by including all residents.

“Everything we do is driven by families,” said Reininger. “We wanted to be the healthiest area in the state, and to get there we all had to be part of it.”

Brownsville is beginning to see improvements across the community in physical activity and food choice. In fact, the thriving and changing community has been selected by the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF) as one of this year’s Culture of Health prize winners. 

Gabe Klein, who in addition to his work with the Urban Land Institute is a former Vice President of Zipcar, spoke about the importance of communication in affecting community change. “In Chicago, we never talked about bike lanes for the sake of bike lanes, we talked about opportunities for better health and ways to get where you’re going,” said Klein. “You have to communicate the larger vision.”

The session moderator, RWJF President and CEO Risa Lavizzo-Mourey, stressed the importance of goal setting and metrics. According to Lavizzo-Mourey, defining a vision is critical to success and measurements lead you to the outcomes you are trying to reach.

Jun 26 2014
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RWJF Honors Six Communities with the 2014 Culture of Health Prizes

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Building a Culture of Health—one where health is a part of everything we do—will not be an easy task. In fact, it will be very hard, admitted Risa Lavizzo-Mourey, MD, MBA, president and CEO of the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation.

It’s a “call to action for all of us,” said Bill Frist, “but these six communities show it can be done.” The six communities in question are the 2014 winners of the RWJF Culture of Health Prize, announced yesterday at the Aspen Ideas Festival. Each community, while different in its own way, thinks about health in a whole new way, as being impacted by all aspects of daily life—from food production to urban design.

Why were these communities chosen from more than 250 applicants from across the country? They’re harnessing the power of partnerships; focusing on lasting solutions; working on the social and economic factors that impact health, such as education and poverty; creating equal opportunities for health for everyone in the community; making the most of resources; and measuring and sharing results.

But what really sets the Prize communities apart, said Lavizzo-Mourey—the “magic ingredient” and the “secret sauce”—are passion, purpose and even joy.

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Jun 25 2014
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Building a Culture of Health in America

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“What we mean by ‘building a Culture of Health’ is shifting the values—and the actions—of this country so that health becomes a part of everything we do,” said Risa Lavizzo-Mourey, MD, MBA, president and CEO of theRobert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF), during her keynote address at Spotlight: Health. RWJF is a founding underwriter of the two-and-a-half day expansion of the annual Aspen Ideas Festival.

“With health, each one of us can make the most of life’s opportunities,” she said. “That’s why we at the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation have made building a Culture of Health our North Star—the central aim of everything we do.”

Risa 22666 Risa Lavizzo-Mourey, RWJF President and CEO

Lavizzo-Mourey explained that the Foundation brought the Culture of Health concept to the Festival because of this year’s theme of “Imagining 2024.”

“When it comes to building a Culture of Health, I believe a decade from now we will have a powerful story of how we resolved to no longer accept that our nation spends more than $2.7 trillion dollars on health care, and yet continues to lose $227 billion dollars in productivity each year because of poor health,” she said.

Lavizzo-Mourey told the audience—which included health thought leaders from around the country—that building a true Culture of Health means changing our current understanding of health and creating a society where everyone has the opportunity to lead a healthy life. She gave the example of the Metro system in Washington, D.C., where babies born in the region of the Red Line—which intersects some of the wealthiest counties in the country—can expect to live to be 84 years old. However, babies born just a few stops away will have lives that are up to seven years shorter.

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According to Lavizzo-Mourey, there are multiple ideas being practiced around the country that contribute to the emerging Culture of Health,  including:

  • Helping patients with things such as housing and food assistance at every medical visit.
  • Changing the workplace culture to be a healthier one, including using stairs instead of elevators and holding standing or walking meetings.

She also enumerated several key ways that RWJF is working to build a sustainable Culture of Health, including committing $500 million toward reversing the U.S. childhood obesity epidemic; helping to ensure that everyone who is eligible for health care coverage knows about the benefits available to them; encouraging businesses to take the lead in investing in the wellbeing of the communities they serve; and addressing community violence.

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Jun 24 2014
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Follow NewPublicHealth this Week for News from ‘Spotlight: Health’ at the Aspen Ideas Festival and the Winners of the RWJF Culture of Health Prize

The Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF) is a lead sponsor for this week’s Spotlight: Health meeting, a two-and-a-half day expansion of the Aspen Ideas Festival, convened annually by the Aspen Institute in Colorado.

Spotlight: Health will bring together world leaders, corporate executives, innovators, entrepreneurs, policy experts, media, philanthropists and thought leaders from many sectors to showcase what health and health care can look like a decade from now.

On Wednesday, RWJF CEO Risa Lavizzo-Mourey will deliver a keynote address: “We Will Have A Powerful Story to Tell: Building a Culture of Health in America,” which will be live-streamed at 10 a.m. (EDT). She will also announce the six winners of the RWJF Culture of Health Prize, which honors communities working at the forefront of health improvement.

NewPublicHealth will live tweet and live blog from the event, as well as post interviews with key thought leaders presenting at the conference. They will include investor/entrepreneur Esther Dyson on “The Way to Wellville,” a wellness competition that’s looking for the key metrics to help improve population health; Cleveland Clinic CEO Toby Cosgrove, MD, on bringing business best practices to health care; and Michael Murphy, of the Boston-based MASS Design Group, on better design ideas for hospitals and health systems.

Follow RWJF and NewPublicHealth coverage of Spotlight: Health using the hashtag #AspenIdeas.

Jun 18 2014
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Health Beyond Health Care: RWJF-Sponsored Washington Post Live Event Sparks Conversation on Creating a Culture of Health

“Health Beyond Health Care” was the focus of a Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF)-sponsored  Washington Post Live Forum today that looked at how creative minds in traditionally non-health fields—such as bankers, architects, designers and educators—are working together to build a Culture of Health in the United States.

“No matter where you live and how much money you have, you should have the opportunity to live a Culture of Health,” said RWJF President and CEO Risa Lavizzo-Mourey, MD, MBA.

>>View the full archived live stream of the forum.

Lavizzo-Mourey said RWJF began its work on the concept of a U.S. Culture of Health in 2009, when the foundation’s Commission to Build a Healthier America released a report recommending the concept. Last year, the Commission came together to see what progress had been made. Among the sites embracing the concept is Marvin Gaye Park in Washington, D.C. Once known as “Needle Park,” the community has transformed itself through lighting and landscaping. This was possible “because the community embraced the principles of a Culture of Health and demonstrated how, from the ground up, people partnering can change the nature of their community and make it healthier,” she said.

Pointing to the most recent Commission report, Lavizzo-Mourey said that looking at communities undergoing changes pushed the Commission to conclude that in order to improve health as a nation, we have to change communities—especially low-income communities—so that people can make healthy choices every day. That also means that health care has to connect with non-health care.

“Each of you,” she told the audience of thought leaders and policy makers, “is uniquely positioned to make changes that can get us to a nationwide Culture of Health.”

The day’s speakers spoke about innovations in their fields that are helping to create local changes in health, and which are often scalable for communities across the country.

“The most successful projects are those that start with bringing communities together to first assess the need, and then prioritize them and move forward with a particular project,” said Sister Susan Vickers, RSM, Vice President of Community Health, Dignity Health, who added that just about all the loans that Dignity Health has made to nonprofits in the community have been repaid.

Why a focus on health? “Health summarized all [of the other factors],” said David J. Erickson, PhD, Director, Center for Community Development Investments, Federal Reserve Bank of San Francisco. “The best predictor for future health for a third grader is whether they are reading on a grade level. Community development is big, but not big enough, and the medical system is not big enough either. We need to start aligning all of these sectors so we’re all working in the same direction to turn these neighborhoods around.” [Editor’s Note: Read a previous NewPublicHealth Q&A with Erickson.]

“We have to treat health as a national treasure—a natural resource—and put it up on the level of the seriousness of the economy,” said Rear Adm. Boris D. Lushniak, Acting U.S. Surgeon General. “The economy doesn’t do anything without a healthy people.”