Category Archives: Blog - New Public Health

Dec 23 2013
Comments

Robocop: Drive Sober or Get Pulled Over

If you’re looking for a sneak preview of the movie Robocop, set for release next February, try the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA). NHTSA has paid for a proprietary video that has the cop reminding drivers to stay sober behind the wheel. NHTSA just released the public service announcement as part of its annual Drive Sober or Get Pulled Over campaign, which runs through January 1. 

Last year, according to NHTSA, deaths in crashes involving drunk drivers increased 4.6 percent — 10,322 lives were lost, compared to 9,865 in 2011. The majority of those crashes involved drivers with a blood alcohol concentration of .15 or higher — nearly double the legal limit. During last year’s holiday season alone, 830 lives were lost in drunk driving crashes.

The campaign also includes state model guidelines for ignition interlock devices. These devices can be added to the car of a driver with a history of drunk driving. Before starting the vehicle, the driver must breathe into the device and if the driver’s blood alcohol limit is too high, the ignition lock will not allow the car to start.

Previous NHTSA research of convicted drunk drivers show that those with ignition locks installed are 75 percent less likely to repeat the behavior compared to those who do not. The guidelines emphasize several programs to maximize effectiveness – including legislation, education, program administration, and implementation.

“It is unacceptable and downright offensive that anyone would get behind the wheel drunk, let alone at twice the legal limit,” said NHTSA Administrator David Strickland. “I urge the states to adopt our new guidelines to protect sober motorists and ensure that individuals convicted of drunk driving learn from their mistakes.”

According to NHTSA, over the past decade, almost two of every five (41 percent) deaths that occur around the New Year’s holiday and the Christmas holiday (37 percent) were alcohol-impaired.

>>Bonus Link: NHTSA has safety tips and information on sober driving during the holidays. View NHTSA's Safety 1n Numbers newsletter for safety tips and information on sober driving during the holidays.

Dec 19 2013
Comments

Public Health News Roundup: December 19

file

Severe Flu-Like Illness Under Investigation in Texas
Health officials in Montgomery County, Texas, are investigating an outbreak of an influenza-like illness that has so far resulted in eight hospitalizations, with four of those patients having since died. Recent tests on the other four show that one seems to have the 2009 H1N1 influenza virus, two were negative for all flu viruses and results are so far unknown on the fourth patient. Close to 2,000 cases of the illness have been reported. So far the investigation suggests that none of the patients who died had been vaccinated against flu, and county residents who have not yet had the flu shot are being urged to get one. According to the county’s health director, the hospitalized patients range in age from 41 to 65, which is not typical; severe flu symptoms more likely occur in very young or very old patients. The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) is assisting the health department in investigating the outbreak, and the county has established a telephone hotline and Facebook page to respond to questions from the public. According to news reports, the current outbreak resembles a cluster of severe respiratory infections in Dothan, Ala., in May; however tests showed that those hospitalized patients had a variety of common respiratory viruses and bacteria, with no unusual pathogens. Read more on flu.

CDC Issues Travel Advisory in Caribbean
The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has issued a travel health notice because of recent cases of chikungunya on the Caribbean island of St. Martin, which have been confirmed by the World Health Organization. According to the CDC, chikungunya is a very serious illness caused by a virus that spreads through mosquito bites. The most common symptoms are fever and joint pain. Other symptoms may include headache, muscle pain, joint swelling, or rash. The mosquito that carries chikungunya virus can bite during the day and night, both indoors and outdoors, and often lives around buildings in urban areas. There is currently no vaccine or medicine to prevent chikungunya. Travelers can protect themselves by following CDC recommendations on preventing mosquito bites. "Microbes know no boundaries, and the appearance of chikungunya virus in the Western hemisphere represents another threat to health security," said CDC Director Tom Frieden, MD, MPH, in the release. "CDC experts have predicted and prepared for its arrival for several years and there are surveillance systems in place to help us track it." Read more on infectious disease.

Life Expectancy Increases among Treated HIV-Positive People in North America
A new study in the journal PLOS ONE finds that a 20-year-old HIV-positive adult on antiretroviral therapy (ART) in the U.S. or Canada may be expected to live into their early 70's, a life expectancy approaching that of the general population. Researchers calculated the life expectancies of nearly 23,000 individuals on ART based on mortality rates in the early to mid-2000s. Changes in life expectancy from 2000-2007 among HIV-positive individuals were then evaluated using sociodemographic and clinical characteristics, such as drug use history and immune cell counts. The researchers found that life expectancy at age 20 increased from 36.1 to 51.4 years from 2000-2002 to 2006-2007. Men and women had comparable life expectancies in all periods except the last (2006-2007). Life expectancy was lower for individuals with a history of injection drug use, those who were non-white, and those who initiated ART with low CD4 count (a count of cells that activate the immune response) compared to those who started at a higher count. Read more on HIV.

Oct 18 2013
Comments

Meme's the Word in Public Health

Public health professionals have very serious and important work to do—but that doesn’t mean they can’t poke a little fun at themselves in the process. Memes—essentially shared cultural statements—are all the internet rage these days, and the field of public health is not immune to their widespread appeal. A few collections of health-related memes have crossed our desks recently.

The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has launched an online campaign to build a community of public health “nerds” that uses social media graphics to spread the word. The campaign, as reported by Public Health Newswire, aims to mobilize the public health community and generate interest in the field’s careers. Since August, the CDC has posted four graphics to its Facebook page that acknowledge the important role of people in public health in a humorous way.

Jim Garrow, of The Face of the Matter, has created a Tumblr of public health memes so that you can get your daily dose of health puns and jokes. In addition, a recent post from Upworthy features 14 memes that use images of everything from Beyonce to Captain Jack Sparrow to depict an “unhealthy” love for public health. The memes on these pages cover a wide range of topics from the Affordable Care Act, to disease outbreaks, to mental health issues by incorporating images from popular television series, movies and internet GIFs.       

A few of our favorites are included below.

file From publichealthmemes.tumblr.com

Read more

Jan 9 2013
Comments

Gun Violence: Teens Demand a Plan

Shortly after the shooting of 20 children and six adults in Newtown, Ct., a large group of Hollywood stars released a video  asking viewers to “demand a plan” on action to be taken to prevent future mass shootings.  Since then several videos have popped up on YouTube that show almost all of the actors in the video wielding weapons in films and television shows.

Another video also demands a plan on gun violence, with a compelling set of spokespeople. This one stars and was developed with minority teens in California and produced by the California Endowment, a private health foundation. At last check, the teens’ video had gotten close to 750,000 hits on YouTube.

NewPublicHealth spoke with Barbara Raymond, director of youth opportunity at the California Endowment about how the video came to be and what the next steps are for taking action on gun violence.

NewPublicHealth: How did this video come to be?

Barbara Raymond: The Endowment looks at health very broadly, including things that happen in our schools and happen in our neighborhoods. We started work a couple of years ago in 14 communities across California, and through the process we’ve worked with  over 20,000 residents and they came back so strongly saying safety and my own health prevention are our number one issues. And they drilled down further to issues including school safety and school climate and the epidemic of suspensions and extreme school discipline policies.  

We have been able to engage a whole set of young people and they have really identified these issues as well. It’s especially the young people saying that working on these issues is urgent, including violence in the community and on the streets of our neighborhoods, fixing issues in our schools and what the kids call the school-to-prison pipeline. These issues have just come up so strongly so when the Newtown tragedy happened, young people wanted to say something and react to that.  

As staff, we talked about how the tragedy would open up a whole public conversation around mental health and school safety practices and staff members suggested we reach out to the kids with the video idea.  

NPH: How were the kids involved in the development of the video?

Read more