Nov 5 2013
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In RN Survey, Younger Nurses Are Positive About Profession, Education

Staffing company AMN Healthcare has released the results of its 2013 Survey of Registered Nurses, highlighting generational differences that have implications for the imminent nursing shortage and the shape of the profession in years to come.

Among key findings, nearly 190,000 nurses may leave nursing or retire now that the economy is recovering, and nearly one in four nurses age 55 and older (23 percent) say they will change their work dramatically by retiring or pursuing work in another field.

Fewer than half the RNs with an associate degree or diploma who were surveyed say they will pursue additional education in nursing. However, younger and mid-career nurses are more likely to do so. The landmark Institute of Medicine report The Future of Nursing: Leading Change, Advancing Health, recommends that 80 percent of the nation’s nurses have BSN or higher degrees by the year 2020.

While nurses of all ages say they are very satisfied with their career choice, younger nurses (19-39) are much more positive than nurses 55 and older about the quality of nursing today. Sixty-six percent of nurses 55 and older say they believe that nursing care has generally declined.

“The younger generation is more optimistic about the profession and more receptive to the changes the industry is experiencing,” Marcia Faller, PhD, RN, chief financial officer of AMN Healthcare, told Advance for Nurses. “These are differences that health systems must understand as they work with multiple generations of nurses.”

This was the fourth annual RN survey conducted by AMN Healthcare, which emailed 101,431 surveys in April to opted-in members of NurseZone.com and RN.com. The company received 3,413 responses, reflecting a response rate of 3.36 percent. Statistical analyses were run with a 95 percent confidence threshold.

See the survey results from AMN Healthcare.
Read coverage of the survey in Advance for Nurses.

What do you think about the survey findings? Do they reflect your views about the future of nursing? Register below to leave a comment.

Tags: Campaign for Action, Health Care Workforce, Medical, Nursing & Dental Workforce, Nurses and Nursing, Nursing