Feb 26 2013
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Diversity in Medical Education

A report from the Association of American Medical Colleges (AAMC) documents an overall trend toward increased diversity among students applying to medical school.

AAMC’s Diversity in Medical Education: Facts and Figures 2012 finds that nearly half of the applicants to U.S. medical schools in 2011 were non-White. Whites were the largest group of applicants, followed by Asians. “Compared with 2010, in 2011 the percentage of Hispanic or Latino applicants increased by 5.7 percent and the number of Black or African American applicants grew by 5 percent,” the report says.

But only 2.5 percent of medical school applicants in 2011 were Black men. Twice as many Black women as men applied to medical school that year, creating the biggest gender gap in medical school applicants among all racial or ethnic groups.

“We have a major, major problem in this country,” Marc Nivet, EdD, AAMC’s chief diversity officer, told American Medical News. “There is just simply an enormous amount of indisputable evidence that we’re not intervening as effectively as we’d like as a society to increase the talent pool of African-Americans who are capable of taking advantage of the science curricula available up and down the pipeline.”

The shortage could worsen access to care in low-income communities, American Medical News reports, because many Black medical students intend to practice in underserved areas. Research also shows that patients report greater satisfaction with their care when they share racial or gender characteristics with their physicians.

The number of women applying to medical school also increased in 2011.

Read the AAMC report.
Read the American Medical News story.

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Tags: Diversity, Medical schools, Medical students and residents, Human Capital, Diversity, Physician Workforce, Research & Analysis