Category Archives: Medical, dental and nursing workforce

Nov 11 2013
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Veterans Get Help Pursuing Nursing Careers

More than 1,000 veterans will obtain undergraduate degrees in nursing over the next four years with the help of a grant from the Health Resources and Services Administration. The grant was announced earlier this fall.

The multi-million-dollar effort, known as the Veterans’ Bachelor of Science in Nursing (VBSN) program, will allow veterans to build on their combat medical skills and experience and receive academic credit for prior military training and experience. The program provides funding to nine institutions to recruit veterans and prepare VBSN undergraduates for practice and employment in local communities, and also develop career ladders that include academic and social supports, career counseling, mentors, and linkages with veteran service organizations and community health systems.

Participating institutions include three in Florida: Jacksonville University, Florida International University, and the University of South Florida; two in Virginia: Hampton University and Shenandoah University; as well as the University of Texas at Arlington, the State University of New York at Stony Brook, Davenport University in Michigan, and the University of Alabama at Birmingham (UAB).

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Nov 5 2013
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In RN Survey, Younger Nurses Are Positive About Profession, Education

Staffing company AMN Healthcare has released the results of its 2013 Survey of Registered Nurses, highlighting generational differences that have implications for the imminent nursing shortage and the shape of the profession in years to come.

Among key findings, nearly 190,000 nurses may leave nursing or retire now that the economy is recovering, and nearly one in four nurses age 55 and older (23 percent) say they will change their work dramatically by retiring or pursuing work in another field.

Fewer than half the RNs with an associate degree or diploma who were surveyed say they will pursue additional education in nursing. However, younger and mid-career nurses are more likely to do so. The landmark Institute of Medicine report The Future of Nursing: Leading Change, Advancing Health, recommends that 80 percent of the nation’s nurses have BSN or higher degrees by the year 2020.

While nurses of all ages say they are very satisfied with their career choice, younger nurses (19-39) are much more positive than nurses 55 and older about the quality of nursing today. Sixty-six percent of nurses 55 and older say they believe that nursing care has generally declined.

“The younger generation is more optimistic about the profession and more receptive to the changes the industry is experiencing,” Marcia Faller, PhD, RN, chief financial officer of AMN Healthcare, told Advance for Nurses. “These are differences that health systems must understand as they work with multiple generations of nurses.”

This was the fourth annual RN survey conducted by AMN Healthcare, which emailed 101,431 surveys in April to opted-in members of NurseZone.com and RN.com. The company received 3,413 responses, reflecting a response rate of 3.36 percent. Statistical analyses were run with a 95 percent confidence threshold.

See the survey results from AMN Healthcare.
Read coverage of the survey in Advance for Nurses.

What do you think about the survey findings? Do they reflect your views about the future of nursing? Register below to leave a comment.

Nov 4 2013
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Stimulating Primary Care Transformation

Michael Hochman, MD, MPH, is medical director for Innovation at AltaMed Health Services, a 43-site federally qualified health center in Southern California.  He completed the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF) Clinical Scholars program at the University of California, Los Angeles, and the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs in 2012.  While a Clinical Scholar, Hochman co-led a primary care demonstration that was published last month in JAMA Internal Medicine.  He recently published, 50 Studies Every Doctor Should Know.

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Primary care in the United States is at a crossroads.  As health care becomes increasingly disjointed and costs continue to rise, primary care providers face increasing pressure to take charge of the health system.  Indeed, we know that health care systems with more developed primary care infrastructures are more efficient and of higher quality than those with a weaker primary care foundation.

But at the same time, more and more health care professionals are shying away from careers in primary care.  Not only is the work challenging (late-night phone calls, numerous tests and studies to follow up on, ever-increasing regulatory requirements), but the pay is lower than in other fields of medicine.

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Sep 18 2013
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Stay Up to Date with RWJF Human Capital!

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Aug 16 2013
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Stay Up to Date with RWJF Human Capital!

Want to stay on top of the latest news from RWJF? Check out all the ways you can get the latest news delivered to you:

Aug 8 2013
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Human Capital News Roundup: ‘The Machine Zone,’ the nation’s energy future, gender roles in after-school activities, and more.

Around the country, print, broadcast and online media outlets are covering the groundbreaking work of Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF) leaders, scholars, fellows, alumni and grantees. Some recent examples:

Natasha Dow Schüll, PhD, MA, an alumna of the RWJF Health & Society Scholars program who has studied ways the gambling industry has designed machines to encourage addiction, spoke to The Atlantic about “the machine zone… where the mind goes as the body loses itself in the task.” Those specific behavioral loops also arise when people use social media services like Facebook, The Atlantic reports. Read more about Schüll’s research.

The New York Times’ Dot Earth blog reports on an open letter co-authored by RWJF Investigator Award in Health Policy Research recipient Matthew C. Nisbet, PhD, to Google’s executive leadership about its decision to host a fundraising luncheon for Sen. James M. Inhofe, a longtime, outspoken critic of scientists who warn about climate change. Google has in recent years “gained a green reputation by investing aggressively in renewable energy projects,” the blog reports, so the decision to support Inhofe took many by surprise.

RWJF Executive Nurse Fellow Loraine Frank-Lightfoot, DNP, MBA, RN, NEA-BC, chief nursing officer of Wooster Community Hospital, spoke to the Akron Beacon Journal about an agreement that will allow pediatricians at Akron Children’s Hospital to oversee the care of all pediatric patients hospitalized at Wooster.

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Aug 1 2013
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The Role of Health Care in Economic Recovery

The growth of the health care industry—which far outpaced growth in other sectors of the economy over the last decade—helped fuel the nation’s economy recovery, according to a report released last month by the Brookings Institution.

Health care has added 2.6 million jobs nationwide over the last decade, and its employment growth rate (22.7%) significantly outpaced the 2.1 percent growth rate in all other industries.

In the nation’s 100 largest metropolitan areas, health care represents a higher share of jobs today than before the recession struck (2007-2009), the report finds. Thirteen percent of total job growth in those metropolitan areas during the economic recovery can be attributed to health care.

Today, health care accounts for more than one in every 10 jobs in the 100 largest metro areas, ranging from 7 to 20 percent of total employment.

Read a summary of the report or download the full report.

Jul 29 2013
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RWJF Milestones, July 2013

The following are among the many honors received recently by Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF) leaders, scholars, fellows, grantees and alumni.

Arthur L. Kellermann, MD, MPH, has been named dean of the F. Edward Hébert School of Medicine at the Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences. He comes to the U.S. Military Medical School from the RAND Corporation, where he was the Paul O’Neill-Alcoa Chair in Health Policy Analysis.  Before that, Kellermann was at the Emory School of Medicine.  Kellermann is an alumnus of both the RWJF Health Policy Fellows program and the RWJF Clinical Scholars program.

The American Academy of Nursing will induct 12 RWJF Executive Nurse Fellows and four RWJF Nurse Faculty Scholars into its 2013 “Class of Fellows,” which is among the most prestigious honors in the nursing profession. The Executive Nurse Fellows are: Margaret Baker, PhD, RN; Susan Bakewell-Sachs, PhD, RN; Gaurdia Banister, PhD, RN; Suzanne Boyle, DNSc, RN; Janie Canty-Mitchell, PhD, RN; Stephen J. Cavanagh, PhD, MS, MPA, RN; Margaret Flinter, PhD, APRN; Mary Ellen Glasgow,  PhD, RN, ACNS-BC; Mary Lou Manning, PhD, RN, CPNP; Sandra Festa Ryan, MSN, CPNP, FCPP, FAANP; Sharon A. R. Stanley, PhD, RN; and Danuta M. Wojnar, PhD, RN. The Nurse Faculty Scholars are: Robert Atkins, PhD, RN; Jason Farley, PhD, MPH, CRNP; Joachim Voss, PhD, RN; and Shannon Zenk, PhD, MPH, RN.

The American Red Cross awarded two RWJF Executive Nurse Fellows its Florence Nightingale Medal: fellow Sharon Stanley, PhD, RN, and alumna Tener Goodwin Veenema, PhD, MPH, RN, CPNP, FNAP, FAAN. The award is the highest international distinction given to those in nursing and is given to “nurses who distinguish themselves in time of peace or war by their exceptional courage and devotion to victims of a conflict or disaster or exemplary service in the areas of public health or nursing education.”

Harold Amos Medical Faculty Development Program alumna Deidra Crews, MD, ScM, was named the 2013-2015 Gilbert S. Omenn Anniversary Fellow at the prestigious Institute of Medicine. Among her previous research is a study examining the association between unhealthy diet and kidney disease among low-income individuals.

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Jul 15 2013
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Stay Up to Date with RWJF Human Capital!

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Jul 11 2013
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Human Capital News Roundup: Emergency room use, immigration, helping youth think about the way they think, and more.

Around the country, print, broadcast and online media outlets are covering the groundbreaking work of Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF) leaders, scholars, fellows, alumni and grantees. Some recent examples:

A new report that provides the first comprehensive assessment of the nation’s public health nurse workforce finds public health nurses have very high levels of job satisfaction, but concerns about job stability and compensation. The report also finds that public health departments struggle to hire nurses and fill vacancies. Among the outlets to report on the findings: Nurse.com, Fierce Healthcare, and HealthLeaders Media. Read more about the report here and here.

Patients with low socioeconomic status use emergency rooms (ERs) more often than primary care because they perceive ERs to be more convenient, less costly and of better quality, according to a study led by RWJF/U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs Clinical Scholars program alumna Shreya Kangovi, MD. Among the outlets to report on the findings: Kaiser Health NewsCapsules blog, Health Day, and Health Canal. Read more about the study.

The U.S. Supreme Court’s recent decision to overturn a 2003 federal law that prohibited government-funded clinics from serving sex workers was also a smart public health decision, Celeste Watkins-Hayes, PhD, recipient of an RWJF Investigator Award in Health Policy Research, writes in a blog post for The Atlantic. “These providers grapple with how to keep all populations safe, not just those engaging in legal and socially desirable behavior,” Watkins-Hayes writes. “As a result, the very people who need the most access to HIV preventive and treatment measures may not receive them … [not] allowing them to take a neutral stance that allows them to focus first and foremost on risk reduction … is counterproductive in the fight against HIV/AIDS and other sexually transmitted diseases.”

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