Category Archives: Advanced practice nurses

Mar 20 2014
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Oncologist Shortage Could Put Cancer Care in Critical Condition by 2025

Nearly 450,000 new cancer patients are likely to have difficulty accessing oncology care in just over a decade, according to a report, “The State of Cancer Care in America: 2014,” released this month by the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO).

The report is described by ASCO as the first-ever comprehensive assessment of challenges facing the U.S. cancer care system. It projects that new cancer cases could increase by 42 percent by 2025, but the number of oncologists will likely grow by only 28 percent, creating a deficit of nearly 1,500 physicians.

“We’re facing a collection of challenges, each one of which could keep cancer treatment advances out of reach for some individuals,” ASCO President Clifford A. Hudis, MD, FACP, said in a news release. “Collectively, they are a serious threat to the nation’s cancer care system, which already is straining to keep up with the needs of an aging population.”

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Feb 21 2014
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Quotable Quotes About Nursing, February 2014

This is part of the February 2014 issue of Sharing Nursing’s Knowledge.

“As an ADN-prepared nurse returning to school, I have been confronted with the formidable gap between the current reality of professional nursing and the push to elevate the level and scope of practice in the face of a projected nursing shortage. I have no doubt that higher levels of education, certification, and experience have the potential to create better nurses and in turn safer environments for our patients, but I do have to question whether the infrastructure necessary to support these changes is in place.”
--Eric Deane, RN, Charlottesville, Va., Thoughts on Entry to Practice, Nurse.com, February 10, 2014

“As medical professionals we are recognizing that on a national level, advanced practice nurses [APNs] are part of the solution to the health care access crisis. The only way that patients are going to get the care they need is if all parts of the medical team, including APNs, midwives, physician’s assistants, physicians, and others, come together as partners. It’s not that nurse practitioners are going to replace any other clinicians. That’s not our goal. But advanced practice nurses are extraordinarily well prepared to provide primary care. They are trained in managing multiple types of health problems and in promoting a healthy lifestyle. With the current challenges in patient care, I can only see the role of the nurse practitioner increasing.”
--Ivy Alexander, PhD, APRN, FAAN, clinical professor and director of advanced practice programs, University of Connecticut School of Nursing, An Expanding Role for Nurse Practitioners, Medical Xpress, February 5, 2014

“More needs to be done to help spread awareness [about the Affordable Care Act]. This is one of the things nurses do best. They educate.”
--Mary Wakefield, PhD, RN, FAAN, administrator, Health Resources & Services Administration, Nurses Step Out to Help with ACA Enrollment, Nursezone.com, January 31, 2014

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Feb 20 2014
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Kentucky Removes APRN Practice Barrier

Kentucky Gov. Steve Beshear signed legislation last week that lifts a key limitation on advanced practice registered nurses (APRNs) and increases consumer access to health care.

The new law “allows more flexibility for nurse practitioners to provide accessible health care to Kentuckians,” Beshear said. “Nurse practitioners are a critical part of helping more Kentuckians get the medical care they need quickly and efficiently, and I am proud of the bipartisan effort to serve Kentucky’s health needs.”

In the past, APRNs were only allowed to prescribe medication with a physician’s written consent. The new law removes that requirement for APRNs who have four or more years of experience prescribing medication under a collaborative agreement with a physician or as an independent practitioner in another state, according to the Future of Nursing: Campaign for Action.

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Jan 28 2014
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Sharing Nursing’s Knowledge: The January 2014 Issue

Have you signed up to receive Sharing Nursing’s Knowledge? The monthly Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF) e-newsletter will keep you up to date on the work of the foundation’s nursing programs, and the latest news, research, and trends relating to academic progression, leadership, and other essential nursing issues. These are some of the stories in the January issue:

Patients Slowly Gaining Access to Care Provided by Advanced Practice Registered Nurses
In recent years, several states have taken steps to ease restrictions on advanced practice registered nurses (APRNs), indicating that efforts to empower them and improve patient access to care are picking up steam. However, many consumers still lack unfettered access to care provided by APRNs because two-thirds of states do not allow them to practice without physician supervision—and even in states that do, APRNs aren’t always able to practice independently.

Stronger Primary Care System Is Goal of RWJF Scholar
RWJF Executive Nurse Fellow Margaret Flinter, PhD, APRN, has been at the center of three movements: community-oriented primary care, the growth of the community health center movement, and the growth of nurse practitioners as primary care providers. She founded the country’s first formal post-graduate residency training program for new nurse practitioners, and co-directs The Primary Care Team: Learning from Effective Ambulatory Practices, a national project supported by RWJF that is working to help health care organizations develop and accelerate innovations.  

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Dec 26 2013
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Reshaping Today’s Bedside Care Team to Meet Tomorrow’s Challenges

The traditional bedside care team must evolve over the next five years in response to significant changes facing the U.S. health care system, according to the American Hospital Association (AHA), which recently convened a roundtable devoted to the issue.

“Reconfiguring the Bedside Care Team of the Future,” a white paper summarizing the discussion, points to several factors driving changes, including 25 million new patients entering the system as a result of the Affordable Care Act, an aging and increasingly diverse population, and more patients experiencing multiple conditions and acute episodes.

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Oct 5 2013
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Consumer Preferences Toward Non-Physician Providers

Linda H. Aiken, PhD, FAAN, FRCN, RN, is the Claire M. Fagin Leadership Professor in Nursing, a professor of sociology, and director of the Center for Health Outcomes and Policy Research at the University of Pennsylvania School of Nursing. Aiken is a research manager supporting the Future of Nursing: Campaign for Action and a National Advisory Committee member for the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Interdisciplinary Nursing Quality Research Initiative. This is cross-posted on the Leonard Davis Institute Voices blog.

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All too often, the debate about expanding the role of nurse practitioners (NPs) and physician’s assistants (PAs) takes place in a vacuum, as though these practitioners do not already deliver significant amounts of primary care. But they do, and existing evidence indicates that quality of care and patient satisfaction are good as a result.

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Even before the passage of the Affordable Care Act, the nation had a shortage of primary care providers. The shortage is likely to intensify when the demand for primary care increases as millions become insured. The numbers of and roles assumed by NPs and PAs have been growing steadily, and allowing these providers to take on an even greater role could address the increased demand for primary care.

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Sep 9 2013
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Community Linkages Increase Access to Diabetes Prevention Education

Robin Whittemore, PhD, APRN, FAAN, is an associate professor at Yale School of Nursing. Whittemore has received national and international recognition for her work in behavioral interventions for type 1 and type 2 diabetes. One focus of her work has been to examine ways to improve access to health programs for vulnerable high-risk populations. She is the primary investigator on a study funded by the RWJF Interdisciplinary Nursing Quality Research Initiative to prevent diabetes among at-risk adults in public housing. This post originally appeared on the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services’ National Partnership for Action blog.

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Minority adults are at a disproportionate risk for developing type 2 diabetes, a challenging illness to manage that is a leading cause of morbidity and mortality in the U.S. Evidence indicates that lifestyle change programs, which incorporate healthy eating, physical activity and modest weight loss, can prevent or delay the development of type 2 diabetes. Yet, access to diabetes prevention programs is limited, particularly among minority and low-income adults.

To help address the issues with access to diabetes prevention programs, we designed a study to link existing community resources—public housing communities and a homecare agency— to minority and low-income adults at-risk for type 2 diabetes. Public housing communities provide housing at reduced rental costs for families of low socioeconomic status. We chose this setting because these communities often have the space and personnel to support a community-based program. The homecare agency consists of nurses who monitor and implement healthcare in a home environment, and are trusted health professionals in public housing communities.

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Jun 6 2013
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Gains in Iowa and Nevada for Patients, Nurses

The Iowa Supreme Court ruled last week that advanced registered nurse practitioners (ARNPs) can supervise fluoroscopy, a high-tech X-ray and imaging procedure. The high court ruling was in response to a challenge by three nursing organizations to an earlier decision from a district court.

“We believe the district court erred in second-guessing the department of public health and nursing board on the adequacy of ARNP training to supervise fluoroscopy,” the Iowa Supreme Court wrote. “The record affirmatively shows ARNPs have been safely supervising fluoroscopy and are adequately trained to do so… Allowing ARNP supervision of fluoroscopy improves access to healthcare for rural Iowans and helps lower costs.”

Experts say the ruling has implications for patients, especially those living in rural areas with limited access to doctors, who will be able to get test results more quickly. That can alleviate fears if the fluoroscopy shows that a patient does not have a serious health problem or, conversely, it can facilitate quicker treatment if a patient needs it.

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Apr 23 2013
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Obama’s Budget Proposal and Nursing

President Obama’s Fiscal Year 2014 budget proposal recommends a $20 million increase over previous budget proposals for the Title VIII Nursing Workforce Development Programs, the primary source of federal funding for nursing education.

“With the proposed increase to Title VIII funding, the Obama administration continues to recognize the invaluable contribution that nurses make in the delivery of care and the need to strengthen our primary care system,” American Nurses Association (ANA) President Karen A. Daley, PhD, RN, FAAN, said in a statement.

According to the Center to Champion Nursing in America (CCNA), the $20 million increase will expand the pool of primary care Advanced Practice Registered Nurses through the Advanced Education Nursing Traineeship Program.  If enacted, and if the funding is sustained, the increase will produce an additional 1,800 primary care nurses over five years.

“The President's proposal to train 1,800 more primary care nurse practitioners would provide a much needed shot in the arm to our health care workforce,” said Winifred Quinn, MA, PhD, director of legislation and field operations at CCNA. “These new health professionals are key to boosting consumer access to primary and preventive care, and other innovative delivery system reforms we are counting on to improve quality and hold down costs.”

The ANA also applauded other health care investments in the budget, including funding for community health centers, new mental health programs, health reform implementation, medical research, and more.

Read ANA’s statement about the budget.
Learn more about Title VIII Nursing Workforce Development Programs.

Mar 13 2013
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Recent Research About Nursing, March 2013

This is part of the March 2013 issue of Sharing Nursing's Knowledge.

Study: APRN-Staffed Clinic Produces Shorter Wait for Diagnoses at Lower Cost for Women with Benign Breast Conditions

A nurse-based approach to diagnosing women with breast conditions is saving money and producing shorter wait times for diagnoses, according to an article in the January issue of Health Affairs.

In 2008, the Virginia Mason Medical Center, a Seattle-based multidisciplinary health care network that logs 800,000 outpatient and 17,000 hospital visits per year, opened a new breast care clinic, with the goal of streamlining the diagnosis and care for women with breast conditions. These include such benign conditions as cysts and fibrocystic breast disease, as well as breast cancer. As part of the clinic’s model, Advanced Practice Registered Nurses (APRNs) take the lead role in diagnosing patients, working with on-site equipment to perform mammography, ultrasound, and magnetic resonance imaging. Patients whose conditions cannot promptly be confirmed as benign meet with breast surgeons for diagnosis and care, if appropriate.

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