Category Archives: Advanced practice nurses

Jul 16 2014
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Fourteen Nursing Schools to Receive Grants

The Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF) has announced the first 14 schools of nursing selected to receive grants to support nurses as they pursue their PhDs. Each of the inaugural grantees of the Future of Nursing Scholars program will select one or more students to receive financial support, mentoring, and leadership development over the three years during which they pursue their PhDs.

The Future of Nursing Scholars program is a multi-funder initiative. In addition to RWJF, United Health Foundation, Independence Blue Cross Foundation, Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, and the Rhode Island Foundation are supporting grants this year.

The program plans to support up to 100 PhD nursing candidates over its first two years.

In its landmark future of nursing report, the Institute of Medicine recommended that the country double the number of nurses with doctorates in order to support more nurse leaders, promote nurse-led science and discovery, and address the nurse faculty shortage. Right now, fewer than 30,000 nurses in the United States have doctoral degrees in nursing or a related field. 

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May 10 2014
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National Nurses Week Online

In addition to the National Nurses Week carnival on this blog, there is a lot of other information available online this year. Following are just a few examples:

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May 5 2014
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Sharing Nursing’s Knowledge: The April 2014 Issue

Have you signed up to receive Sharing Nursing’s Knowledge? The monthly Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF) e-newsletter will keep you up to date on the work of the Foundation’s nursing programs, and the latest news, research, and trends relating to academic progression, leadership, and other essential nursing issues. Following are some of the stories in the April issue.

Consumers Benefit from Expanded APRN Practice, FTC Says
In March, the Federal Trade Commission (FTC)—the government agency that works to protect consumers and prevent anti-competitive business practices—released Policy Perspectives: Competition and the Regulation of Advanced Practice Nurses. It warns that barriers to advanced practice registered nurse (APRN) practice could reduce the kind of free-market competition in the health care industry that benefits consumers. The report also says APRNs play a “critical role” in alleviating shortages of primary care providers.

Building a Community of Nurse Scientists
Ann Cashion, PhD, RN, FAAN, has been hooked on the promise and potential of genetics and genomics in nursing since the first survey of the human genome was completed in 2000. She participated in the inaugural cohort of the Summer Genetics Institute at the National Institute of Nursing Research (NINR), and it changed the trajectory of her career. Now, 14 years later, Cashion is NINR’s newly appointed scientific director. She is also an alumna of the RWJF Executive Nurse Fellows program.

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May 2 2014
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FTC Report on APRN Practice Demands Our Attention

Margo Brooks Carthon, PhD, APRN, is an assistant professor in the School of Nursing at the University of Pennsylvania and a Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF) Nurse Faculty Scholar.

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The Federal Trade Commission (FTC) created quite a stir when it released a recent report in support of expanded scope-of-practice (SOP) regulations for advanced practice registered nurses (APRNs)1. Why after all, would the FTC—an agency charged with protecting consumers—take an interest in the regulatory woes of nurses?

Because unnecessary restrictions on APRN practice have the potential to undermine competition in the health care market and impede consumer access to care. That, at least, is the conclusion of the FTC, which released a policy paper making that argument in March entitled Competition and the Regulation of Advanced Practice Nurses.

The FTC aims to prevent unfair methods of competition and unfair, deceptive acts or practices in (or affecting) commerce. Overly restrictive SOP regulations on APRNs may be an example of anti-competitive conduct, the FTC argues, because they may prevent nurse practitioners (NPs) and other APRNs from entering the health care market as providers of care that patients need.

The report also argues that while SOP policies may be intended as a form of consumer protection, they may have the opposite effect. Decades of research link APRNs to safe, high-quality, and cost-effective care. That extensive body of evidence makes it difficult to support the many restrictive SOP regulations that are in place in many states.

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Apr 21 2014
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Quotable Quotes About Nursing, April 2014

“It is a truism that healthy children are in a better position to learn in the classroom.

Unfortunately, it’s also a sad fact of life that the role of a school nurse—who is on campus to help insure students’ well-being—often goes overlooked or underestimated.”

--Editorial, Board Should Work to Remedy Nursing Shortage, Burbank Leader, April 11, 2014

“Our goal is not just to be at the table [of policy-making discussions]. We need practiced, experienced nurses to vote at that table, and when our voices are heard, the patient’s voices are heard, and this means we must invest more time, attention, and resources to develop nurse leaders.”

--Karen Daley, PhD, RN, FAAN, president, American Nursing Association, Nursing Leaders Essential in Providing Quality Health Care, Houston Chronicle, April 4, 2014

“I have watched the industry grow over the years as nurses become more involved than just taking vital signs, giving medications and bathing patients. There is a more team-oriented approach, which has developed in hospitals, and this naturally makes it a more rewarding career option. As a result, more and more nursing programs are in demand.”

--Brenda McAllister, MSN, EdD, director of nursing, EDMC-Brown Mackie College, Health Care Industry Experiencing New Demands for Nurses, (Milwaukee) Journal Sentinel, April 3, 2014

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Mar 20 2014
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Oncologist Shortage Could Put Cancer Care in Critical Condition by 2025

Nearly 450,000 new cancer patients are likely to have difficulty accessing oncology care in just over a decade, according to a report, “The State of Cancer Care in America: 2014,” released this month by the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO).

The report is described by ASCO as the first-ever comprehensive assessment of challenges facing the U.S. cancer care system. It projects that new cancer cases could increase by 42 percent by 2025, but the number of oncologists will likely grow by only 28 percent, creating a deficit of nearly 1,500 physicians.

“We’re facing a collection of challenges, each one of which could keep cancer treatment advances out of reach for some individuals,” ASCO President Clifford A. Hudis, MD, FACP, said in a news release. “Collectively, they are a serious threat to the nation’s cancer care system, which already is straining to keep up with the needs of an aging population.”

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Feb 21 2014
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Quotable Quotes About Nursing, February 2014

This is part of the February 2014 issue of Sharing Nursing’s Knowledge.

“As an ADN-prepared nurse returning to school, I have been confronted with the formidable gap between the current reality of professional nursing and the push to elevate the level and scope of practice in the face of a projected nursing shortage. I have no doubt that higher levels of education, certification, and experience have the potential to create better nurses and in turn safer environments for our patients, but I do have to question whether the infrastructure necessary to support these changes is in place.”
--Eric Deane, RN, Charlottesville, Va., Thoughts on Entry to Practice, Nurse.com, February 10, 2014

“As medical professionals we are recognizing that on a national level, advanced practice nurses [APNs] are part of the solution to the health care access crisis. The only way that patients are going to get the care they need is if all parts of the medical team, including APNs, midwives, physician’s assistants, physicians, and others, come together as partners. It’s not that nurse practitioners are going to replace any other clinicians. That’s not our goal. But advanced practice nurses are extraordinarily well prepared to provide primary care. They are trained in managing multiple types of health problems and in promoting a healthy lifestyle. With the current challenges in patient care, I can only see the role of the nurse practitioner increasing.”
--Ivy Alexander, PhD, APRN, FAAN, clinical professor and director of advanced practice programs, University of Connecticut School of Nursing, An Expanding Role for Nurse Practitioners, Medical Xpress, February 5, 2014

“More needs to be done to help spread awareness [about the Affordable Care Act]. This is one of the things nurses do best. They educate.”
--Mary Wakefield, PhD, RN, FAAN, administrator, Health Resources & Services Administration, Nurses Step Out to Help with ACA Enrollment, Nursezone.com, January 31, 2014

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Feb 20 2014
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Kentucky Removes APRN Practice Barrier

Kentucky Gov. Steve Beshear signed legislation last week that lifts a key limitation on advanced practice registered nurses (APRNs) and increases consumer access to health care.

The new law “allows more flexibility for nurse practitioners to provide accessible health care to Kentuckians,” Beshear said. “Nurse practitioners are a critical part of helping more Kentuckians get the medical care they need quickly and efficiently, and I am proud of the bipartisan effort to serve Kentucky’s health needs.”

In the past, APRNs were only allowed to prescribe medication with a physician’s written consent. The new law removes that requirement for APRNs who have four or more years of experience prescribing medication under a collaborative agreement with a physician or as an independent practitioner in another state, according to the Future of Nursing: Campaign for Action.

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Jan 28 2014
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Sharing Nursing’s Knowledge: The January 2014 Issue

Have you signed up to receive Sharing Nursing’s Knowledge? The monthly Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF) e-newsletter will keep you up to date on the work of the foundation’s nursing programs, and the latest news, research, and trends relating to academic progression, leadership, and other essential nursing issues. These are some of the stories in the January issue:

Patients Slowly Gaining Access to Care Provided by Advanced Practice Registered Nurses
In recent years, several states have taken steps to ease restrictions on advanced practice registered nurses (APRNs), indicating that efforts to empower them and improve patient access to care are picking up steam. However, many consumers still lack unfettered access to care provided by APRNs because two-thirds of states do not allow them to practice without physician supervision—and even in states that do, APRNs aren’t always able to practice independently.

Stronger Primary Care System Is Goal of RWJF Scholar
RWJF Executive Nurse Fellow Margaret Flinter, PhD, APRN, has been at the center of three movements: community-oriented primary care, the growth of the community health center movement, and the growth of nurse practitioners as primary care providers. She founded the country’s first formal post-graduate residency training program for new nurse practitioners, and co-directs The Primary Care Team: Learning from Effective Ambulatory Practices, a national project supported by RWJF that is working to help health care organizations develop and accelerate innovations.  

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Dec 26 2013
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Reshaping Today’s Bedside Care Team to Meet Tomorrow’s Challenges

The traditional bedside care team must evolve over the next five years in response to significant changes facing the U.S. health care system, according to the American Hospital Association (AHA), which recently convened a roundtable devoted to the issue.

“Reconfiguring the Bedside Care Team of the Future,” a white paper summarizing the discussion, points to several factors driving changes, including 25 million new patients entering the system as a result of the Affordable Care Act, an aging and increasingly diverse population, and more patients experiencing multiple conditions and acute episodes.

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