Category Archives: Nurses

Oct 9 2014
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RWJF Scholars in the News: The nurse faculty shortage, teaching empathy, a link between overtime and diabetes, and more.

Around the country, print, broadcast and online media outlets are covering the groundbreaking work of Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF) leaders, scholars, fellows, alumni and grantees. Some recent examples:

ABC News explores the nation’s nursing workforce shortage, focusing specifically on the faculty shortage at nursing schools. “Suddenly, we turned around and realized we’re not attracting enough nurses to go into teaching,” said Kimberly Glassman, PhD, RN, chief nursing officer at NYU Langone Medical Center. “The fear is we will have to shrink the number of nurses we can prepare for the future at a time when we need to prepare more.” Glassman is an RWJF Executive Nurse Fellow. The article was republished by Yahoo News and ABC News Radio.

RWJF Health & Society Scholars program alumnus Allison Aiello, PhD, MS, is interviewed for an NBC News story on Enterovirus D-68. She recommends that parents consider getting flu shots for their children, noting that preventing children from getting the flu should help make Enterovirus less complicated to diagnose and treat. The video is available here.

RWJF Harold Amos Medical Faculty Development Program scholar Paloma Toledo, MD, co-authors a Huffington Post blog entry on the need for medical schools to teach students to be empathetic. Over the course of their training, they become less empathetic, as opposed to more empathetic, and the reasons for this are unclear,” Toledo writes, recommending lectures on active listening and communication skills, among other measures. 

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Oct 8 2014
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Proud to be ‘The Nurse on the Board’!

This week marks the 4th anniversary of the Institute of Medicine’s future of nursing report. Fran Roberts, PhD, RN, FAAN, is owner and executive leader of the Fran Roberts Group, a consulting and contracting practice providing expertise on health care leadership, higher education, governance, regulation and patient safety. The Kate Aurelius Visiting Professor for the University of Arizona College of Medicine–Phoenix, Roberts serves on the boards of directors of several health care organizations, including the Presbyterian Central New Mexico Health System. She is an alumna of the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF) Executive News Fellows program.

Fran Roberts

“Leadership from nurses is needed at every level and across all settings.” That’s what the Institute of Medicine’s (IOM) Future of Nursing panel wrote in its 2011 report—a message I’ve taken to heart. Here’s why the IOM was exactly right.

I’ve served (and still serve) on several health-related boards, in most cases as the only nurse in a group dominated by physicians, local business leaders, and administrators. My experience on the Presbyterian Central New Mexico Healthcare Services board, which I now chair, is both representative and instructive. I joined the board about eight years ago, recruited by one of my colleagues in the RWJF Executive Nurse Fellows program, Kathy Davis, RN, the senior vice president and chief nursing officer at Presbyterian.

It was an honor to be asked, doubly so because I live and work out of state. But Presbyterian had concluded that it needed a nurse with executive experience on its board, so I got the call.

I started my first term on the board determined not to pigeon-hole myself as “the nurse on the board.” I didn’t want my fellow board members to think I had tunnel vision, unable to see beyond the need to advocate for nurses. That’s not to say I didn’t intend to advocate for nurses when that was called for, but I didn’t want to be limited to that, either in my colleagues’ estimation or in reality.

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Oct 7 2014
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A Business Community Board Role Broadens a Nurse Leader’s Horizons

This week marks the 4th anniversary of the Institute of Medicine’s future of nursing report. Sandra McDermott, DNP, RN, NEA-BC, is an assistant professor of nursing and the director of health and service related professions at Tarleton State University in Fort Worth, Texas. A member of the Texas Team Action Coalition, which recently launched the Nurses On Board training program, she is a newly appointed member of the board of directors for the Fort Worth Chamber of Commerce South Area Council.

Sandra McDermott

I have been in my university director position for about six months now, and I knew that before I started teaching classes this fall, I had an opportunity to really get involved in the Fort Worth community. I wanted to get my name out there, because when I do that, I am getting my school’s name out there, too. I started attending Chamber events and enjoyed them, and I realized that the South Area Council is the one that encompasses the hospital district, which is where I want to have a lot of my connections.

If my role is to draw nursing students and build awareness for our nursing programs, then clearly, focusing on the hospital district makes a lot of sense. I had made a strong connection with a South Area Council board member, so I lobbied the Chamber to join the board, and they ultimately added a new spot and appointed me to it, which was very humbling. They did not have a university represented on the Council, and they saw value in having a nurse and an educator join them.

The main campus for my school is about 90 miles away. Everyone knows about our presence there, where there are around 8,600 students. But in Fort Worth, we have around 1,600 students, and the nursing programs are relatively new and very small. I knew I needed to be out in the community as we build up our programs, and what better way to do it than to be at multiple Chamber functions? And as a board member, I knew I could influence a lot more people. In the hospital district, I can go in as not only a nurse and an educator, but a Chamber leader as well. That is a great platform to advocate for my school programs and for wellness and health care as community priorities.

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Oct 6 2014
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Celebrating Four Years of Nurses Leading Change to Advance Health

Susan B. Hassmiller, PhD, RN, FAAN, directs the Future of Nursing: Campaign for Action, which is implementing recommendations from that report. Hassmiller also is senior adviser for nursing for the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation.

Susan Hassmiller

This week marks the fourth anniversary of The Future of Nursing: Leading Change, Advancing Health, the landmark Institute of Medicine (IOM) report that galvanized the nursing field and partners to participate in health system transformation. Nurses nationwide are heeding the report’s call to prepare for leadership roles at the national, state and community levels. Why?  Simply put, nurses coordinate and provide care across every setting, and they can represent the voices of patients, their families and communities. Nurses are the reality check on committees and in boardrooms.

The Future of Nursing: Campaign for Action, a national initiative led by the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF) and AARP to implement recommendations from the future of nursing report, is promoting nursing leadership—and I’m thrilled by our progress.

To date, Action Coalitions report that 268 nurses have been appointed to boards. Virginia has implemented an innovative program to recognize outstanding nurse leaders under age 40, and several other states including Arkansas, Nebraska and Tennessee are offering similar programs. New Jersey has set a goal of placing a nurse leader on every hospital board. Texas has partnered with the Texas Healthcare Trustees to provide its nurses with governance and leadership education to prepare them for board leadership. Even better, other states are fostering nursing leadership by adopting these best practices.

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Oct 3 2014
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Meeting the Needs of Children in Partnership with Nurses and Nurse Practitioners

Sunny G. Hallowell, PhD, APRN, is a postdoctoral fellow, and Danielle Altares Sarik, MSN, APRN, a predoctoral fellow, at the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation-funded Center for Health Outcomes and Policy Research at the School of Nursing at the University of Pennsylvania. Hallowell is also a Leonard Davis Institute Fellow. Both are pediatric nurse practitioners serving on the executive board of the National Association of Pediatric Nurse Practitioners, Pennsylvania Delaware Valley Chapter. Monday, October 6, is National Child Health Day.

Sunny G. Hallowell Sunny G. Hallowell

Many Americans may not know that children born in the United States are less likely to survive to their fifth birthday than children born in other high-income peer countries. The United States falls at the bottom of the Commonwealth Fund’s recently released “Mirror, Mirror” report, ranking last out of 11 countries for infant mortality.  

As children hold the greatest potential to achieve good health, high infant and child mortality may be particularly surprising.  Early lifestyle and health care decisions can set children on a trajectory that determines their health for a lifetime.  

Danielle Altares Sarik Danielle Altares Sarik

As a country, we can do more to ensure the health of our youngest and most vulnerable population. Using nurses and nurse practitioners (NP) to the highest level of their education and training is one strategy. Robust use of nurses and NPs can offer solutions to improve infant and child survival rates through prenatal, postnatal and early childhood health surveillance. 

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Oct 3 2014
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Recent Research About Nursing, October 2014

This is part of the October 2014 issue of Sharing Nursing’s Knowledge.

Study: California’s Mandatory Nurse-Patient Ratio Law Reduces Work-Related Injuries

A 2004 California law mandating specific nurse-to-patient staffing standards in acute care hospitals has significantly reduced job-related injuries and illnesses for nurses, according to a study published online by the International Archives of Occupational and Environmental Health.

A team of researchers from the Schools of Medicine and Nursing at the University of California, Davis used data from the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics to compare illness and injury rates in California and other states before and after the law’s implementation. The data documented a downward trend nationwide, but also found that California’s workplace injury and illness rate declined even faster than the national rate.

In California, the researchers estimated that the law resulted in an average decline from 176 to 120 injuries and illnesses per 10,000 registered nurses—a 32-percent reduction. For licensed practical nurses, the rate went from 244 injuries to 161 per 10,000—a 34-percent reduction.

Lead author J. Paul Leigh, PhD, speculated in a news release that having more nurses available to help with repositioning patients in bed could help prevent back and shoulder injuries. Similarly, needle-stick injuries could be less common because nurses now conduct blood draws and other procedures in a less time-pressured manner.

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Oct 2 2014
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In the Media: New Annual Event Honors Federal Nurses

This is part of the October 2014 issue of Sharing Nursing’s Knowledge.

Every May, the news media zooms in on nurses during National Nurses Week, held the second week of the month in honor of Florence Nightingale’s birthday.

Now, nurses are getting another turn in the media spotlight—but this time in September.

Or at least that’s the goal of Federal Nurses Week, a new annual event held in recognition of the nation’s 100,000 federally employed nurses. The event, held this year between Sept. 22 and Sept. 28, is sponsored by the American Federation of Government Employees (AFGE). J. David Cox, RN, national president of AFGE, is a nurse and also serves on the national executive board of the AFL-CIO.

During the week, supporters were encouraged to host an event to recognize a federal nurse or nurses and spread the word about the importance of federal nurses through posts to social media sites or letters to the editor of newspapers or other publications. AFGE is also urging Congress to pass a resolution recognizing the federal nurse workforce.

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Oct 1 2014
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Quotable Quotes About Nursing, October 2014

This is part of the October 2014 issue of Sharing Nursing’s Knowledge.

“I’ve learned over the last couple of years, as my mother came to rely more on nursing assistance at home for daily tasks, that health care is all about what happens between people. It’s the relationship of trust between the patient and family members and a universe of medical professionals. Nowhere is the relationship more vital than between patient and nurse.

Nurses are the front line of care. Doctors parachute into our world and we into theirs, but nurses stay on the ground from crucial moment to moment.”
--Marsha Mercer, independent journalist, They Put the ‘Care’ in Health Care, The (Lynchburg, Va.) News & Advance, Sept. 28, 2014

“Unfortunately, due to the culture of the health care industry, nurses have usually taken a back seat to physicians and administrators when it comes to changing the policies and practices of optimizing care. However, there is a wealth of evidence that points to the vital and increasing leadership role nurses are taking in health care practices around the country.  ... The message to hospital administrators should be clear—if you’re looking to improve the quality of care and reduce costs, try talking to the people working on the front lines every day—talk to a nurse.”
--Rob Szczerba, PhD, MS, CEO of X Tech Ventures, Looking to Transform Healthcare? Ask a Nurse, Forbes, September 23, 2014

“I’ve been a nurse for 25 years and love what I do. But when we are forced to work overtime, it adds unnecessary stress, frustration and fatigue that can impair your ability to function at your best. You can’t think straight when you’ve been working 16 hours.”
--Terri Menichelli, Nurse., State Auditor Will Look into Health Care Overtime Law, The Citizen’s Voice (Wilkes-Barre, Pennsylvania), Sept. 19, 2014 

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Sep 30 2014
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Building the Optimal Primary Care Team

The Robert Wood Johnson Foundation’s (RWJF) LEAP National Program is working to create a culture of health by discovering, documenting and sharing innovations in the primary care workforce. To advance this goal, the program is holding a series of six webinars that highlight best practices. Summaries of the first two webinars in the series are available here and here. The third webinar in the series focused on building an effective primary care team. Speakers included leaders from three primary care sites around the country that the LEAP program has deemed exemplars.

LEAP Director Ed Wagner, MD, MPH, began the webinar by framing the question for participants: Patients need multiple forms of contact across a primary care team, he observed. Given that, how does an organization build an effective team? How does an organization go from a collection of employees to a coherent, high-functioning team?

Charles Burger, MD, Medical Director Emeritus at Martin’s Point Health Care in Bangor, Maine, discussed the importance of recruitment and training.

He began by describing the members of Martin’s Point’s teams:  a medical provider, practice administrator, collaborative care nurses, medical assistants, and care team patient service representatives.

The recruiting process is quite rigorous, he explained. “We invite the whole team in reviewing and selecting new team members,” he said. “Really what we are looking for are certain behavioral characteristics.” He said training is similarly rigorous: a six- to eight-week competency-based training period for each new team member, working one-on-one with a trainer and moving steadily through a number of modules. Each new team member moves through each module at his or her own pace, and move on when they demonstrate competence with the material in each module. 

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Sep 30 2014
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Sharing Nursing’s Knowledge: The September 2014 Issue

Have you signed up to receive Sharing Nursing’s Knowledge? The monthly Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF) e-newsletter will keep you up to date on the work of the Foundation’s nursing programs, and the latest news, research and trends relating to academic progression, leadership and other essential nursing issues. Following are some of the stories in the September issue.

Advocates Work to Recruit Latinos to Nursing
Latinos comprised only 3 percent of the nation’s nursing workforce in 2013, according to a survey by the National Council of State Boards of Nursing and the National Forum of State Workforce Centers, and 17 percent of the nation’s population, according to the U.S. Census Bureau. More Latino nurses can help narrow health disparities, experts say. “Having a culturally competent nurse really makes a difference in terms of compliance and patient outcomes,” said Elias Provencio-Vasquez, PhD, RN, FAAN, FAANP, an RWJF Executive Nurse Fellows program alumnus. “Patients really respond when they have a provider who understands their culture.”

New Careers in Nursing Program Helps Minnesota College Expand and Diversify While Improving Care in Rural Communities
Since its 2008 launch, the RWJF New Careers in Nursing program (NCIN) has kept a tight focus on attracting a diverse group of “second-career” students to nursing. Along the way, NCIN has had a profound effect on many of the institutions themselves. One such school, the College of St. Scholastica (CSS), saw its overall program change and grow substantially, in great measure because of its participation. NCIN has supported scholarships to 40 CSS accelerated-degree nursing students over the last seven years.

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