Category Archives: Nurses

Jun 24 2014
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Nurse Leader Honored for Public Service Work

Kathy Apple, MS, RN, FAAN, is CEO of the National Council of State Boards of Nursing and an alumna of the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF) Executive Nurse Fellows program (2006-2009). She received the Ben Shimberg Public Service Award from the Citizen’s Advocacy Center.

Kathy Apple

Human Capital Blog: Congratulations on receiving the Ben Shimberg Public Service Award from the Citizen’s Advocacy Center! What does the award mean for you and for your work at the National Council of State Boards of Nursing (NCSBN)?

Kathy Apple: It is quite an honor for both NCSBN and myself, as this recognition comes from an independent, objective organization that advocates for the public interest, effectiveness, and accountability of health care licensing bodies. It confirms that NCSBN is on the right track in supporting its members, the nurse licensing boards in the United States.

HCB: The award is named for a man who is considered the “father” of accountability in professional and occupational licensing. How are you carrying out his mission at NCSBN?

Apple: Dr. Shimberg was an expert on competency testing and challenged all licensing boards to ensure competence assessments meet the highest psychometric and ethical standards. He urged licensing boards to continuously examine how to improve testing procedures. Dr. Shimberg challenged licensing boards to improve communication to applicants and consumers, to keep data and accurate records on all board business, and be accountable for their own performance.  He advocated for licensing boards to conduct research in all aspects of regulatory functions. He encouraged collaboration between and among licensing agencies. He challenged all regulators to have and follow their own code of ethics. Dr. Shimberg really was incredibly insightful and visionary regarding the role and work of licensing boards.

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Jun 23 2014
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RWJF Milestones, June 2014

The following are among the many honors received recently by Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF) leaders, scholars, fellows, grantees and alumni:

Emery Brown, MD, PhD, an alumnus of the Harold Amos Medical Faculty Development Program has been elected a member of the National Academy of Sciences.

RWJF Investigator Award in Health Policy Research recipient James Perrin, PhD, is the new president of the American Academy of Pediatrics. He took office on January 1, 2014, beginning a one-year term.

The American Association of Colleges of Nursing (AACN) has named Deborah E. Trautman, PhD, RN, as its new chief executive officer, effective June 16. Trautman, an RWJF Health Policy Fellows program alumna, currently serves as executive director of the Center for Health Policy and Healthcare Transformation at Johns Hopkins Hospital.

The American College of Physicians (ACP), the nation’s largest medical specialty organization, has voted Wayne Riley, MD, MPH, MBA, its president-elect. Riley is a former RWJF senior health policy associate.

Kenneth B. Chance, Sr., D.D.S. has been appointed dean of the Case Western Reserve University School of Dental Medicine and will begin his duties on July 1, 2014. He is an alumnus of the RWJF Health Policy Fellows program, and served on its national advisory committee. His is a current member of the national advisory committee of the RWJF Summer Medical and Dental Education Program.

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Jun 20 2014
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The DEU as a Response to the Nurse Faculty Shortage

Janet M. Banks, MSN, RNC, is an instructor and clinical faculty at the University of Portland, a recipient of the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Evaluating Innovations in Nursing Education grant. She is working on her Doctor of Nursing Practice degree at Case Western Reserve University, with a focus on nursing clinical education.

Janet Banks

It’s no secret that there’s a serious shortage of nursing faculty in the United States. This problem will result in schools of nursing educating too few nurses to meet the growing demand for these health care professionals. One solution to this vexing problem is to increase the number of Dedicated Education Units, or DEUs, to increase faculty capacity.

Chances are good that if you are reading this blog, you know what a DEU is. But, for the sake of being on the same page, it is a collaboration between a nursing unit and an academic institution such as a school of nursing. Often referred to as an academic-service partnership, the school of nursing provides students as well as faculty who are experts in teaching. The nursing unit provides a culture that supports learning, as well as expert nurses to act as teachers.

The students, nurses, and faculty usually work in a ratio of two students to each nurse, with the faculty supporting the nurse as teacher and supporting the student’s professional development.

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Jun 19 2014
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RWJF Scholars in the News: Debt and health, tax exemption controversy, peer influence on adolescent smokers, and more

Around the country, print, broadcast, and online media outlets are covering the groundbreaking work of Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF) leaders, scholars, fellows, alumni, and grantees. Some recent examples:

In the context of the Obama administration’s efforts to ease student loan debt, TIME reports on a study by RWJF Health & Society Scholars program alumna Elizabeth Sweet, PhD, that explores the toll debt takes on the borrower’s physical health. Past studies have focused on mental health issues, TIME writes, but Sweet’s research links debt not just to mental health, but also to high blood pressure and general health problems. Sweet says the problem has long-term implications. “These health issues are a warning for more health problems down the road,” she says, “so we have to think about this as a long-term phenomenon.” Forbes also highlights her research.

A Medscape story about a study that shows a direct correlation between vaccinating health care personnel against influenza and reducing cases of flu in the community quotes Mary Lou Manning, PhD, RN, CPNP, an RWJF Executive Nurse Fellows alumna. “We now actually have evidence indicating that higher health care worker vaccination rates in hospitals are having a community effect; they’re actually resulting in lower rates of influenza in the community. That’s remarkably exciting,” says Manning, who is president-elect of the Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology. The article is available here (free login required).

Modern Healthcare reports on federal efforts to address concerns about tax exemption for certain nonprofit hospitals, citing research by Gary Young, JD, PhD, recipient of an RWJF Investigator Award in Health Policy Research. In order to obtain tax-exempt status, the Affordable Care Act requires nonprofit hospitals to track and report the charity care and community benefits they provide. Young found wide variation in the contributions of nonprofit hospitals. “The current standards and approach to tax exemption for hospitals is raising concerns about a lack of accountability for hospitals,” he says, and creating problems because “hospitals don’t really know what’s expected of them.” The Internal Revenue Service has proposed a rule to address the issue. (Free registration is required to view the article.)

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Jun 18 2014
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Quotable Quotes About Nursing, June 2014

This is part of the June 2014 issue of Sharing Nursing’s Knowledge.

“A registered professional school nurse is the only person [who] has the education, the training, and the skill level to meet the needs of kids in the schools. It’s all about what the kids need and how can they attend schools, be healthy, and learn. Health and education go together: If a child is not healthy, he can’t learn.”
--Sue Buswell, RN, director, Montana Association of School Nurses, Philadelphia Tragedy Highlights Role of School Nurses, Education Week, June 2, 2014

“I quite frankly don’t understand how a school can function without a school nurse. They really are one of the most cost-effective, unrecognized resources in our country.”
--Anne Sheetz, MPH, RN, NEA-BC, director, school health services, Massachusetts Department of Public Health, School Nurses Save, Not Cost Money, New Study Says, Philadelphia Inquirer, May 29, 2014

“And lest we forget: a heartfelt thanks to all nurses, present and past, who are or have served in the military in any capacity, in some cases losing their lives as they tried to save other lives and heal the wounded. And to their families.”
--Jacob Molyneux, BA, MFA, senior editor and blog editor, American Journal of Nursing, Memorial Day Weekend: Thanks to the Nurses Who Served, May 23, 2014

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Jun 18 2014
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Stay Up to Date with RWJF!

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Jun 17 2014
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In the Media: Summer Reading

This is part of the June 2014 issue of Sharing Nursing’s Knowledge.

Nurse history buffs have two new titles to choose from this summer reading season.

In Nurses and Midwives in Nazi Germany: The“Euthanasia Programs,” Susan C. Benedict, CRNA, PhD, FAAN, professor of nursing and ethics at the University of Texas Health Science Center in Houston, tells the harrowing tale of how ethics in nursing and midwifery were abrogated during the Nazi era. Edited by Benedict and Linda Shields, MD, PhD, BSN, professor of nursing at James Cook University in Australia, the book was published in April.

Another new history book, by author Mary Cronk Farrell, tells a heroic story of nursing during World War II. Released in February and targeted at young readers, Pure Grit: How American World War II Nurses Survived Battle and Prison Camp in the Pacific, tells the inspiring story of American Army and Navy nurses serving in the Philippines who survived three years as prisoners of war.

The bookshelves are also offering a host of new nursing memoirs, including Duty Shoes: A Nurse’s Memoir, by Camille Foshee-Mason, RN; The Last Visit: Reflections of a Hospice Nurse, by Margaret Pecoraro Dodson, RN; and Whose Death Is It, Anyway?: A Hospice Nurse Remembers, by Sharon White, RN, BSN. 

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Jun 17 2014
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Recent Research About Nursing, June 2014

This is part of the June 2014 issue of Sharing Nursing’s Knowledge.

Research Compares Nurse and Physician Prescription Practices

A newly published systematic review of more than four decades of research on nurse prescribing finds that in the U.S. states and foreign countries in which nurses are allowed to prescribe, their prescription practices are similar to those of physicians, but their patients report higher satisfaction with their care and are more likely to return for follow-up visits.

The review was conducted by a team of researchers in the Netherlands—one of several countries in which nurses may prescribe. The team screened all studies they could find on the subject dating back to 1974, finally identifying 35 studies that met their criteria, including 13 from the United States, 12 from the United Kingdom, five from the Netherlands, two from Canada, two from Norway, and one from Colombia. The studies’ methods and specific topics varied, but the team conducting the review identified a number of trends in the research. They wrote:

  • “Our findings suggest that nurses prescribe for a wide range of patients and in comparable ways to physicians. Overall, nurses appear to prescribe for just as many patients as physicians do, nurses prescribe comparable numbers of medicines per patient visit and there appear to be few differences between nurses and physicians in the type and dose of medication prescribed and in clinical outcomes.

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Jun 13 2014
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Neonatal Nurse Practitioner Advocates for Culturally and Linguistically Appropriate Services

Yolanda Ogbolu, Ph.D., CRNP, is an assistant professor of family and community health and deputy director at the Office of Global Health at the University of Maryland-Baltimore. She is a Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF) Nurse Faculty Scholar (2013-2016).

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Human Capital Blog: Congratulations on your recent Outstanding Faculty Award from the University of Maryland-Baltimore! What does it mean for you and for your career?

Yolanda Ogbolu: It was an honor to be recognized by the University of Maryland-Baltimore (UMB) and by my colleagues in the school of nursing who nominated me for this award. It specifically identifies a faculty member on campus who has demonstrated achievements in the area of diversity and inclusiveness. It is presented in the annual Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., and Black History Month celebration.

Having my colleagues share and honor my passion for addressing health inequities using the social determinants of health model locally and globally was particularly rewarding, as I reflected on the work of Dr. King and others before me. At the same time, I acknowledge that most of my work benefitted from my passion for collaboration. Therefore, I wholeheartedly shared the award with many people who have assisted me along this path. Receiving the award has strengthened my career and enthusiasm for actively engaging in efforts that move forward the ideals of social justice and health equity in a way that transforms practice and patient outcomes in my local and global communities.

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Jun 12 2014
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RWJF Scholars in the News: Alzheimer’s disease, violence against women, drug marketing, and more.

Around the country, print, broadcast, and online media outlets are covering the groundbreaking work of Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF) leaders, scholars, fellows, alumni, and grantees. Some recent examples:

Jason Karlawish, MD, participated in the design of new research that offers “an opportunity to study the future of the way we’re going to think about, talk about and live with the risks of Alzheimer’s disease,” he tells the Associated Press. The study is aimed at testing an experimental drug to see if it can protect seniors who are healthy but whose brains “harbor silent signs” of risk, such as a sticky build-up of proteins that can be a precursor to Alzheimer’s. Karlawish is an RWJF Investigator Award in Health Policy Research recipient. Read more about his work on Alzheimer’s disease here and here.

The work of RWJF Scholars in Health Policy Research alumni Ted Gayer, PhD, and Michael Greenstone, PhD, is featured in an Economist article about incorporating into federal cost-benefit analyses the global benefits of regulation to reduce carbon emissions, rather than benefits that accrue only to the United States. Agencies conduct such analyses before promulgating regulations to test whether the estimated benefits of a regulation exceed the estimated costs. Typically, estimated benefits include only those that accrue to the United States, but because global warming reaches far beyond U.S. borders, the Obama Administration’s calculations include global benefits. Greenstone was also recently cited in the New York Times.

Chris Uggen, PhD, an RWJF Investigator Award recipient, writes about the decline in the incidence of sexual violence and intimate partner violence against women since 1993 in a Pacific Standard article. Rates of sexual violence and intimate partner violence decreased from almost 10 per 1,000 in 1994 to 3.2 per 1,000 in 2012, Uggen writes. While those numbers are encouraging, “misogyny and violence against women remain enormous social problems—on our college campuses and in the larger society,” he says. Uggen’s post also appeared on Sociological Images, a Pacific Standard partner site.

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