Category Archives: Workforce issues

Oct 10 2014
Comments

BSN Qualifications Recommended for the Nation’s Nurses: Four Years of Progress

Linda H. Aiken, PhD, RN, FAAN, is the Claire Fagin Professor of Nursing, professor of sociology, director of the Center for Health Outcomes and Policy Research, and senior fellow of the Leonard Davis Institute for Health Economics at the University of Pennsylvania. Olga Yakusheva, PhD, is an associate professor at the University of Michigan School of Nursing.

Linda Aiken Linda H. Aiken

Four years ago the Institute of Medicine’s (IOM) landmark report on the future of nursing was released. The study was remarkable in multiple respects including the interdisciplinary perspectives of national experts comprising the study committee, the breadth and scope of the study, its actionable recommendations, and the commitment of the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF) to provide philanthropic funds to help implement the study’s recommendations—a rarity. One net result of the IOM Report, as viewed on the 4th anniversary of its release, is its notable impact on the commitment of stakeholders to finally make the transition of the nation’s nurse workforce to BSN qualifications, after many decades of limited progress.

Olga Yakusheva - medium enlarge Olga Yakusheva

Changing trends in nurse employment and education: The IOM recommended that 80 percent of nurses in the United States hold at least a baccalaureate in nursing (BSN) by the year 2020. The recommendation was quite bold considering that two-thirds of new nurses still graduated with less than a BSN, despite numerous previous reports and commissions over decades recommending the BSN as the entry qualification for professional nurses.  

While the percentage of nurses with bachelor’s and graduate education had been slowly increasing over time, when the IOM report was issued only about 49 percent of nurses held a BSN. However, the IOM’s recommendation, based upon a growing research base documenting that patient outcomes were better in settings that employed more BSN-qualified nurses, acted as a tipping point to mobilize responses from many stakeholders that together are impacting changes in nurses’ qualifications.

Read more

Oct 9 2014
Comments

RWJF Scholars in the News: The nurse faculty shortage, teaching empathy, a link between overtime and diabetes, and more.

Around the country, print, broadcast and online media outlets are covering the groundbreaking work of Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF) leaders, scholars, fellows, alumni and grantees. Some recent examples:

ABC News explores the nation’s nursing workforce shortage, focusing specifically on the faculty shortage at nursing schools. “Suddenly, we turned around and realized we’re not attracting enough nurses to go into teaching,” said Kimberly Glassman, PhD, RN, chief nursing officer at NYU Langone Medical Center. “The fear is we will have to shrink the number of nurses we can prepare for the future at a time when we need to prepare more.” Glassman is an RWJF Executive Nurse Fellow. The article was republished by Yahoo News and ABC News Radio.

RWJF Health & Society Scholars program alumnus Allison Aiello, PhD, MS, is interviewed for an NBC News story on Enterovirus D-68. She recommends that parents consider getting flu shots for their children, noting that preventing children from getting the flu should help make Enterovirus less complicated to diagnose and treat. The video is available here.

RWJF Harold Amos Medical Faculty Development Program scholar Paloma Toledo, MD, co-authors a Huffington Post blog entry on the need for medical schools to teach students to be empathetic. Over the course of their training, they become less empathetic, as opposed to more empathetic, and the reasons for this are unclear,” Toledo writes, recommending lectures on active listening and communication skills, among other measures. 

Read more

Sep 11 2014
Comments

RWJF Scholars in the News: Mental health and returning service members, children of incarcerated parents, nurse turnover, more.

Around the country, print, broadcast and online media outlets are covering the groundbreaking work of Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF) leaders, scholars, fellows, alumni and grantees. Some recent examples:

When reserve service members return to civilian life, such stresses as marriage and health care problems are more likely to trigger drinking problems than traumatic events that occurred during deployment, according to a study reported by Fox News. When it comes to the “long-term mental health for National Guard members, what matters is what happens after they come home,” said lead author Magdalena Cerdá, PhD, MPH, an RWJF Health & Society Scholars program alumna. “Financial difficulties, re-integrating, difficulties accessing quality health care, all of those seem to matter.” But deployment stress also has an impact. “[T]he more traumatic events they are exposed to during or after combat, the more problems they have in daily life when they come home,” she said. RWJF Investigator Award in Health Policy Research recipient Sandro Galea, MD, MPH, DrPH, co-authored the study. Health Canal also reported on it.

An estimated 17.5 percent of newly licensed RNs leave their first nursing job within the first year, and one in three leave within two years, according to research conducted by RWJF’s RN Work Project. Advance for Nurses quotes co-directors Christine T. Kovner, PhD, RN, FAAN, and Carol Brewer, PhD, RN, FAAN. “One of the biggest problems we face in trying to assess the impact of nurse turnover on our health care system as a whole is that there’s not a single, agreed-upon definition of turnover,” Kovner said. “A high rate of turnover at a hospital, if it's voluntary, could be problematic,” Brewer added, “but if it’s involuntary or if nurses are moving within the hospital to another unit or position, that tells a very different story.” Nurse.com also covered the study.

Having incarcerated parents is associated with significant health problems and behavioral issues, and may be more harmful to children’s health than divorce or the death of a parent, USA Today reports. “These kids are saddled with disadvantages,” said Kristin Turney, PhD, author of the study that reached those conclusions. She is an RWJF Health & Society Scholars program alumna. “They’re not only dealing with parental incarceration, but also mental health issues.” The study found that having a parent in prison was associated with such conditions as attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, learning disabilities, speech or language problems, and developmental delays. Turney’s study was also covered by US News and World Report, Salon, Psych Central, Healthline and Mother Jones, among other outlets. 

Read more

Jul 24 2014
Comments

Sharing Nursing’s Knowledge: The July 2014 Issue

Have you signed up to receive Sharing Nursing’s Knowledge? The monthly Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF) e-newsletter will keep you up to date on the work of the Foundation’s nursing programs, and the latest news, research, and trends relating to academic progression, leadership, and other essential nursing issues. Following are some of the stories in the July issue.

Nurses Lead Innovations in Geriatrics and Gerontology
As the nation becomes older and more diverse, and more people are living with chronic health problems, nurses are developing innovations in geriatric care. They are finding new ways to improve the quality of care for older adults; increase access to highly skilled health care providers with training in geriatrics; narrow disparities that disproportionately affect older minorities; avoid preventable hospital readmissions; and more. Nurse-led innovations are underway across the nation to improve care for older Americans.

Improving Care for the Growing Number of Americans with Dementia
By 2050, 16 million Americans—more than triple the current number—will have Alzheimer’s disease. RWJF Nurse Faculty Scholars are working now to get ahead of the problem. “We’re all well aware of our aging population and how we’re going to see more individuals with Alzheimer’s disease or some other form of dementia,” says alumna Elizabeth Galik, PhD, CRNP, who is researching ways to improve functional and physical activity among older adults with dementia.

Read more

Jun 6 2014
Comments

The Role of Primary Care Providers in Changing the Culture of Care in Communities

The Robert Wood Johnson Foundation’s (RWJF) LEAP National Program is working to create a culture of health by discovering, documenting, and sharing innovations in the primary care workforce. To advance this goal, the program is holding a series of six webinars that highlight best practices. The first webinar addressed the responsibility of health delivery organizations to strengthen community health and the ways primary care providers can address social determinants of health.  It featured leaders from four primary care sites around the country that the LEAP program has deemed exemplars.

Bringing Change to a Low-Income Community in Philadelphia

Patricia Gerrity, PhD, RN, associate dean for community programs at Drexel University and director of 11th Street Family Health Services at Drexel University, discussed the origins and work of her clinic, which is a partnership with the Philadelphia Housing Authority (PHA) that began in 1996. In response to a letter between the University and the PHA, Gerrity worked to gain mutual trust with the aim of improving the residents’ health status.

Getting started wasn’t easy, Gerrity noted.  To achieve some wins, she assigned a public health nursing faculty member from Drexel to each public housing development. The nurse faculty members asked residents about pressing problems—and then became partners in solving them. For instance, residents said car accidents were an issue, so stop signs were put up. Residents wanted to learn CPR, so training was offered. Residents expressed concerns about dog bites, so they worked with Animal Control to remove stray dogs. “We had to have some short term wins to gain trust,” Gerrity said. 

Read more

May 27 2014
Comments

52 Schools of Nursing to Provide 400 Scholarships Through RWJF’s New Careers in Nursing Program

The Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF) today announced awards to 52 schools of nursing that will comprise the final cohort of its prestigious New Careers in Nursing Scholarship Program (NCIN). In the upcoming academic year, the schools will use these grants to support traditionally underrepresented students who are making a career switch to nursing through an accelerated baccalaureate or master’s degree program. NCIN is a program of RWJF and the American Association of Colleges of Nursing.

Each NCIN Scholar has already earned a bachelor’s degree in another field, and is making a transition to nursing through an accelerated nursing degree program, which prepares students to assume the role of  registered nurse in as little as 12-18 months.

In addition to a $10,000 scholarship, NCIN scholars receive other support to help them meet the demands of an accelerated degree program. All NCIN grantee schools maintain leadership and mentoring programs for their scholars, as well as a pre-entry immersion program to help them succeed.

Read more

May 27 2014
Comments

When It Comes to Cost and Quality of Hospital Care, Nurse Tenure and Teamwork Count

The largest study to examine the relationship between nurse staffing and patient care reveals that patients get the best care when they are treated in hospital units staffed by teams of nurses who have extensive experience in their current jobs. The study, conducted by an interdisciplinary team including Patricia Stone, PhD, RN, FAAN, Centennial Professor of Health Policy at the Columbia University School of Nursing and Ciaran Phibbs, PhD, research economist at the Health Economics Resource Center at the Palo Alto Veterans Administration Health Care System, was funded by the Interdisciplinary Nursing Quality Research Initiative (INQRI).

The research team reviewed more than 900,000 patient admissions over four years (from 2003 through 2006) at hospitals in the Veterans Administration Health Care System. They analyzed nurses’ payroll records and patients’ medical records to see how nurse staffing affected patients’ length of stay. Longer hospital stays tend to be associated with delays and errors in care delivery, so shorter stays indicate better care. Shorter stays also reduce the cost of care.

Researchers found that a one-year increase in the average tenure of registered nurses (RNs) on a hospital unit was associated with a 1.3 percent decrease in the average length of stay.

Read more

Apr 27 2014
Comments

How to Advance Minority Health? Further Develop the Pipeline of Minority Physicians.

To mark National Minority Health Month, the Human Capital Blog asked several Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF) scholars to respond to questions about improving health care for all. In this post, Paloma Toledo, MD, MPH, an assistant professor of anesthesiology at Northwestern University, responds to the question, “Minority health is advanced by combating disparities and promoting diversity. How do these two goals overlap?” Toledo is a Harold Amos Medical Faculty Development Program scholar.

file

Addressing racial and ethnic disparities has been a part of the national public health agenda for decades. The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services establishes national objectives to improve the health of Americans through the Healthy People program. In Healthy People 2000, one goal was to reduce racial and ethnic disparities. A decade later, the goal was revised. Currently, the goal for Healthy People 2020 is to establish health equity, eliminating disparities. Despite these goals, disparities persist, and minorities continue to suffer worse health than non-minority whites. Much work has focused on raising awareness of disparities and improving the quality of care for minority patients; however, increasing the number of minority physicians is equally important in combating health care disparities. 

Read more

Mar 6 2014
Comments

An Unhealthy Sign for Health Care Workers? Survey Says They’re the Most Stressed

Health care may have some of the nation’s most promising career opportunities. But it also promises a lot of stress to go along with those jobs, according to a survey from CareerBuilder and its health-care-focused website.

Health care workers topped the list of most stressed workers in the United States, with 69 percent reporting that they feel stress in their current jobs. Next are workers in professional and business services, retail, financial services, information technology, leisure and hospitality, and manufacturing. Health care also had the highest percentage (17) of workers reporting that they are “highly stressed.”

“Stress is part of the environment in many health care settings, but high levels sustained over a long period of time can be a major detriment to employee health and ultimately stand in the way of providing quality care to patients,” CareerBuilder Healthcare President Jason Lovelace said in a news release.

Read more

Feb 11 2014
Comments

Health Care Programs Get Federal Funding Boost

Federal health care workforce and research programs will receive modest funding boosts in this fiscal year under a new omnibus spending bill cleared in January by Congress, according to a summary released by the American Association of Colleges of Nursing (AACN). The programs affect nursing and other health professions.

Under the Consolidated Appropriations Act of 2014, signed into law on Jan. 17, two health care workforce agencies are slated for increases in fiscal year 2014.

The Health Resources and Services Administration will receive $6.3 billion, an 8 percent increase over the last fiscal year, and the Bureau of Health Professions will get $469.2 million, a 7 percent increase, according to AACN. Nursing workforce development programs under Title VIII of the Public Health Service Act will get $223.8 million in fiscal year 2014, a 3 percent increase.

Read more