Category Archives: Workforce issues

Mar 6 2014
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An Unhealthy Sign for Health Care Workers? Survey Says They’re the Most Stressed

Health care may have some of the nation’s most promising career opportunities. But it also promises a lot of stress to go along with those jobs, according to a survey from CareerBuilder and its health-care-focused website.

Health care workers topped the list of most stressed workers in the United States, with 69 percent reporting that they feel stress in their current jobs. Next are workers in professional and business services, retail, financial services, information technology, leisure and hospitality, and manufacturing. Health care also had the highest percentage (17) of workers reporting that they are “highly stressed.”

“Stress is part of the environment in many health care settings, but high levels sustained over a long period of time can be a major detriment to employee health and ultimately stand in the way of providing quality care to patients,” CareerBuilder Healthcare President Jason Lovelace said in a news release.

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Feb 11 2014
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Health Care Programs Get Federal Funding Boost

Federal health care workforce and research programs will receive modest funding boosts in this fiscal year under a new omnibus spending bill cleared in January by Congress, according to a summary released by the American Association of Colleges of Nursing (AACN). The programs affect nursing and other health professions.

Under the Consolidated Appropriations Act of 2014, signed into law on Jan. 17, two health care workforce agencies are slated for increases in fiscal year 2014.

The Health Resources and Services Administration will receive $6.3 billion, an 8 percent increase over the last fiscal year, and the Bureau of Health Professions will get $469.2 million, a 7 percent increase, according to AACN. Nursing workforce development programs under Title VIII of the Public Health Service Act will get $223.8 million in fiscal year 2014, a 3 percent increase.

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Jan 29 2014
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Serious Illnesses Changed Our Perspectives for 2014 and Beyond

Taura Barr, PhD, RN, is an assistant professor at the West Virginia University School of Nursing. Timothy Landers, PhD, RN, CNP, is an assistant professor at The Ohio State University College of Nursing. Both are Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Nurse Faculty Scholars. This post is part of the “Health Care in 2014” series.

Taura Barr Taura Barr and her family.
Timothy Landers Timothy Landers and his family.

This is the time of year when people consider how they are doing with their new year’s resolutions. The three most common resolutions are lose weight, improve finances, and exercise more. Two out of three of those resolutions involve health.

Sadly, most of these resolutions will fail.

While we rate our physical, emotional, and spiritual health as a top priority, in practice we often fall short. This seems to be especially true for us as health care providers and our health care system.

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Jan 17 2014
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Accelerating Support for Nursing Education

Jane Kirschling, PhD, RN, FAAN, is president of the American Association of Colleges of Nursing and an alumna of the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Executive Nurse Fellows program. This post is part of the “Health Care in 2014” series, in which health leaders, as well as Robert Wood Johnson Foundation scholars, grantees, and alumni, share their New Year’s resolutions for our health care system and their priorities for action this year.

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2014 marks the 10th anniversary of the landmark study conducted by Linda Aiken, PhD, FAAN, FRCN, RN, and colleagues, which showed a strong connection between nursing education and patient outcomes. Published in the September 2004 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA), the study’s researchers found that patients experienced significantly lower mortality and failure to rescue rates in hospitals with higher proportions of baccalaureate-prepared nurses. In her analysis, Dr. Aiken stated that the study’s results “suggest that employers’ efforts to recruit and retain baccalaureate-prepared nurses in bedside care and their investments in further education for nurses may lead to substantial improvements in the quality of care.”

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Jan 16 2014
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Full Utilization of Nurse Practitioners: Helped by Laws, Hindered by Health Care Culture

Efforts to expand the role of nurse practitioners (NPs) to help address the country’s shortage of primary care providers have been bolstered by legislation in several states. But laws expanding scope of practice may not do all they could to relieve the nation’s primary care crisis, according to a new study by researchers at the Columbia University School of Nursing, which suggests that the culture in health care settings can impede full utilization of NPs.

The study, published in the Journal of Professional Nursing, was conducted in Massachusetts, where state health reform increased demand for primary care and legislation recognized NPs as primary care providers. Researchers found that gains made by government can be neutralized by formal and informal practices at health care organizations. For example, the study cited instances where NPs were not allowed to conduct physical assessments or see new patients.

“Organizational policies can often trump governmental policies, keeping the contribution of the nurse practitioner unrecognized and preventing them from making the fullest contribution possible to effective patient care,” lead researcher Lusine Poghosyan, PhD, RN, an assistant professor of nursing at Columbia and a Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Nurse Faculty Scholar, said in a news release.

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Jan 15 2014
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Nurses: Leading with Purpose, Power, and Passion to Advance the Nation’s Health

A High Priority for Action in 2014

Marsha Howell Adams, PhD, RN, CNE, ANEF, is president of the National League for Nursing (NLN), and senior associate dean of academic programs and professor at The University of Alabama Capstone College of Nursing.  This post is part of the “Health Care in 2014” series, in which health leaders, as well as Robert Wood Johnson Foundation scholars, grantees, and alumni, share their New Year’s resolutions for our health care system and their priorities for action this year.

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This past December, I was lucky to attend a holiday reception at the White House with Judith Halstead, PhD, RN, FAAN, ANEF, my immediate predecessor as president of the NLN. It’s one of the nice benefits of being president.

I have experienced the White House via public tours many times throughout the years, but this visit was very different. We were able to explore rooms that those on White House tours can only glimpse from the hallways. We could study the art on the walls and absorb a sense of the purpose, power, and passion of past and present leaders. The prospect of meeting the president and first lady created such an excitement in me that it almost took my breath away. No matter one’s political point of view, meeting our nation’s president, especially in the White House, is truly an honor and a privilege.

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Jan 14 2014
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Healthy Caregivers Are Important to Your Health Care

Karen A. Daley, PhD, RN, FAAN, is president of the American Nurses Association. This post kicks off the “Health Care in 2014” series, in which health leaders, as well as Robert Wood Johnson Foundation scholars, grantees, and alumni share their New Year’s resolutions for our health care system and their priorities for action this year.

Karen Daley

With so much attention focused these days on our health care system, it may not have occurred to you that the health of your own caregivers could also help determine the quality and safety of the care you receive.

Paying attention to things like getting enough rest, managing fatigue and work/life stress, living tobacco-free, taking advantage of preventive immunizations and exams, eating nutritionally and maintaining an active lifestyle and healthy weight are important for everyone. Unfortunately, nurses are often so busy caring for others that they fail to care for themselves. It is for this reason the American Nurses Association, which represents the interests of the nation's 3.1 million registered nurses (RNs), recently launched a Healthy Nurse™ program to promote healthier lifestyles and behaviors among nurses.

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Jan 13 2014
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Feds Set Aside $45 Million to Strengthen Nursing

The federal government announced late last year it would deliver $55.5 million in fiscal 2013 to programs designed to strengthen, diversify, and grow the health care workforce.

The bulk of the funds—82 percent, or $45.4 million—are targeted at nurses, the largest segment of the health care workforce.

The announcement came as welcome news to supporters of a national campaign backed by the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF) and AARP that is working to transform the nursing profession to improve health and health care.

Many of the grants support the Future of Nursing: Campaign for Action’s call for a more highly educated and more diverse nursing workforce and for more interprofessional collaboration among nurses and other health care professionals, according to Winifred Quinn, PhD, co-director of the Center to Champion Nursing in America, an initiative of AARP, the AARP Foundation, and RWJF.

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Jan 7 2014
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On the Job and Facing Bias: Study Looks at Foreign-Educated Nurses

Historically, the United States has relied on the recruitment of foreign-educated nurses (FENs) to fill gaps caused by widespread nursing shortages. Yet many FENs face unequal treatment on the job, according to a new study by researchers at the George Washington University School of Public Health and Health Services (SPHHS).

Forty percent of FENs, defined in the study as immigrants who are in the United States to work in hospitals and other health care facilities, say their wages, benefits, or shift assignments are inferior to those of their U.S.-born colleagues. The findings, which appear in the January issue of the American Journal of Nursing, suggest that FENs recruited by staffing agencies and from impoverished countries are especially vulnerable to potentially discriminatory treatment.

Lead author Patricia Pittman, PhD, an associate professor of health policy at SPHHS, called the findings “alarming” in a news release. Pittman added that “if confirmed by additional research, this survey raises a host of troubling ethical and practical concerns for health care facilities working to retain nursing staff and provide high-quality care to patients.”

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Dec 3 2013
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Job Growth in Health Care Looks Healthy, Indeed

More than half of the 50 jobs projected to be the nation's fastest-growing occupations over the next several years are in the health care industry, according to a new report from the human resources company CareerBuilder and its research affiliate, Economic Modeling Specialists International.

Among the 26 health care jobs in the top 50, the ones with growth rates of 15 percent or greater include biomedical engineers, personal care and home health aides, physical therapy and occupational therapy assistants, physical therapy aides, diagnostic medical sonographers, and medical scientists (except epidemiologists).

Read the report, America's Job Outlook: Occupational Projections 2013-2017.
Read coverage of it in Becker's Hospital Review.