Category Archives: Nursing schools

Nov 8 2013
Comments

New Mexico Governor Martinez Announces New Common Nursing Curriculum

New Mexico Governor Susana Martinez New Mexico Governor Susana Martinez. [Photo by permission of the state of New Mexico via Wikimedia Commons.]

At a news conference yesterday in Albuquerque, New Mexico Governor Susana Martinez announced the establishment of a statewide common nursing curriculum, designed to increase the number of nurses with Bachelor of Science in Nursing (BSN) degrees in the state. She was joined at the event by leaders from the New Mexico Nursing Education Consortium (NMNEC), which led the effort to develop the curriculum and build partnerships between community colleges and universities.

NMNEC’s work is supported by the New Mexico Academic Progression in Nursing (APIN) initiative, a grantee of the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF).

Implementation of this curriculum in New Mexico will allow nursing students to more easily transfer credits from community colleges within the state, so they can pursue BSNs without having to physically attend large universities like the University of New Mexico in Albuquerque or New Mexico State University in Las Cruces. For the first time, state community colleges will be able to partner with one of these universities to offer bachelor’s degrees in nursing.

Read More

Sep 18 2013
Comments

Sharing Nursing’s Knowledge: The September 2013 Issue

Have you signed up to receive Sharing Nursing’s Knowledge? The monthly Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF) e-newsletter will keep you up to date on the work of RWJF’s nursing programs, and the latest news, research, and trends relating to academic progression, leadership, and other critically important nursing issues. These are some of the stories in the September issue:

Wanted: Young Nurse Faculty
Nearly three-quarters of full-time nurse faculty are 50 and older, and the nurse faculty workforce is on the brink of a mass retirement. Most young nurses have chosen to work in other settings, and the insufficient number of young nurse faculty threatens to exacerbate the looming nurse shortage. Read about what is stopping young nurses from entering academia, and how RWJF programs are encouraging faculty careers.

RWJF Fellow Tapped to Head New Diversity Initiative in California
RWJF Executive Nurse Fellows alumna Mary Lou de Leon Siantz was tapped in June to head up the Center for the Advancement of Multicultural Perspectives on Science (CAMPOS) at the University of California, Davis, which aims to increase the participation of women, and Latinas in particular, in the fields of science, technology, engineering, and math. The appointment of a Latina nurse to this high-profile position calls attention to the often overlooked fact that science undergirds the nursing profession, and to the valuable role that women, and Latinas, play in scientific endeavors.

Read More

Sep 3 2013
Comments

Lack of Nurse Faculty Creates a “Double Whammy,” NBC Reports

In the latest installment in its “Quest for Care” series that looks at the country’s shortage of health care providers, NBC News reported over the weekend on the nursing workforce.  As the nation struggles to train enough nurses to care for an aging population and the influx of patients who will be newly insured because of health care reform, one thing is holding them back: a shortage of nurse faculty.

“Just as the country needs nurses the most, a shortage of professors is curbing the capacity of nursing schools to crank out graduates with advanced degrees,” the story says, citing data from the American Association of Colleges of Nursing that nursing schools are turning away tens of thousands of qualified applicants because they lack the faculty to teach them.

The College of Nursing at the University of South Carolina is turning away a few hundred students each year for that very reason, its dean, Jeanette Andrews, told NBC. Andrews, PhD, RN, is an alumna of the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF) Executive Nurse Fellows program.

But nurse faculty are hard to find: they need advanced degrees, and leaving the field for the classroom often requires nurses to take a pay cut. Hospitals and other care settings are competing for the same skilled nurses that colleges need, experts say.

“I have five faculty positions open right now,” Andrews added. “It is really hard to find qualified, doctorally prepared faculty who are willing to relocate or to move out of a higher-paying salary in the field.”

See the story from NBC News.
Learn more about the RWJF Executive Nurse Fellows program.

Aug 20 2013
Comments

New ADN-to-BSN Scholar: 'Exhausted' and 'Grateful'

Ariel Eby is a scholar in the new ADN-to-BSN bridge program at California State University, Los Angeles, which is funded by the California Action Coalition through a grant from the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF) Academic Progression in Nursing (APIN) initiative. The California Action Coalition is a part of the Future of Nursing: Campaign for Action, a collaborative effort backed by RWJF and AARP to transform nursing and improve health and health care.

file

I never thought it was possible to be so exhausted and so grateful at the same time. These last few years have proven to be the most challenging of my life, but the most rewarding at the same time.

"I want to spend the rest of my life eating, drinking, living, learning, and teaching nursing."

When I say I'm exhausted, I'm not exaggerating. When I first heard about the debut of the ADN-to-BSN bridge program at California State University-Los Angeles, I didn’t think there was any way I could make it work. I have three jobs. I’m already in a program getting my associate degree in nursing (ADN)—and am getting married later this summer, the day after the first quarter ends. “There's no way!” I thought. 

But where there's a will there’s a way, I'd soon find out.

Read More

Aug 19 2013
Comments

New ADN-to-BSN Program the 'Key to a Successful Future'

Robyn Williams is a scholar in the new ADN-to-BSN bridge program at California State University, Los Angeles, which is funded by the California Action Coalition through a grant from the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF) Academic Progression in Nursing (APIN) initiative. The California Action Coalition is a part of the Future of Nursing: Campaign for Action, a collaborative effort backed by RWJF and AARP to transform nursing and improve health and health care.

file

When I first heard about the accelerated ADN-to-BSN program at California State University, Los Angeles, my ears perked up and I was instantly very interested. Having the chance to pursue my bachelor’s degree in nursing (BSN) while finishing my associate degree in nursing (ADN) at Long Beach City College was ideal.

I had already planned to start working toward obtaining my bachelor’s soon after I graduated and had even looked into some programs. So, the option to join this accelerated program at Cal State LA, as we call it out here, was a no-brainer.

Read More

Jul 8 2013
Comments

Survey: Nursing Education Shortages Begin to Ease

In a hopeful sign, an annual survey from the National League for Nursing (NLN) finds that fewer qualified applicants were turned away from schools of nursing in the 2011-2012 school year than in recent years. The percentage of nursing programs that turned away qualified applicants dropped “substantially” for every program type except baccalaureate degree programs in the survey, and the percentage of students turned away also declined. The percentage of programs that could not fill available seats fell in 2012 as well.

In a news release, NLN President Judith Halstead, PhD, RN, FAAN, ANEF, called the trend “encouraging.” She noted that, “just two years ago the percentage of nursing programs that turned away qualified applicants was peaking across all types of nursing education programs, including almost two thirds of baccalaureate programs.”

The NLN Annual Survey of Schools of Nursing finds that the nurse faculty shortage continues to be the main obstacle to expansion for graduate programs, although that shortage is easing some as well. According to the new survey, 73 percent of responding schools reported hiring new nurse faculty in the past 12 months. More than two-thirds of those new hires have a master’s degree; 16 percent have PhDs; and 7 percent have DNPs.

Noting that doctoral nursing programs rejected 37 percent of qualified applicants in 2012, NLN CEO Beverly Malone, RN, PhD, FAAN, said in the news release: “With the importance of academic progression and a continuing need for doctorally prepared nurse faculty, we are pleased to note that this rejection rate has now dropped from 43 to 37 percent, though clearly we still have a long way to go.”

An increasing number of associate degree nurse and practical nurse programs cite a shortage of clinical sites as an obstacle to expansion, the survey reports.

Read a news release about the study.
See the study.
Read a 2012 blog post by Halstead on nurse education.

Jul 2 2013
Comments

Academic Progression in Nursing: Wyoming Style

Mary E. Burman, PhD, FAANP, is dean and professor of nursing at the University of Wyoming (UW). She was a Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF) Executive Nurse Fellow from 2007 to 2010 and coordinates a nurse education and leadership project that is supported by Partners Investing in Nursing’s Future (PIN), an initiative of RWJF and the Northwest Health Foundation.

file

Human Capital Blog: The Institute of Medicine (IOM) calls for a more highly educated nursing workforce and, in particular, for 80 percent of nurses to have bachelor’s degrees by 2020. What is the educational level of nurses in Wyoming? Do the state’s health care organizations prefer or require that nurses hold baccalaureate degrees?

Mary Burman: Wyoming, like many other states, and especially like many rural states, faces significant challenges in obtaining the IOM goal that 80 percent of nurses hold bachelor’s degrees by 2020. The Wyoming Center for Nursing and Health Care Partnerships (WCNHCP), home of the state’s nursing workforce center and Action Coalition, has developed estimates for the current number of nurses with baccalaureate degrees (BSN) and has made projections over the next four years.

We estimate that 36.9 percent of registered nurses (RNs) in Wyoming currently have baccalaureate or higher degrees. However, that percentage will not increase significantly over the next four years; in fact it may actually drop, given the number of new RNs with associate degrees in nursing (ADNs) and the number of nurses who are preparing to retire.

Read More

Jun 26 2013
Comments

NCIN Announces Support for 400 New Nurses

Vernell DeWitty, PhD, RN, is deputy program director for New Careers in Nursing, a program of the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF) and the American Association of Colleges of Nursing.

file

Luis Sanchez has come a long way in life from his humble beginnings as the son of Mexican migrants. He was recently named New York University’s  (NYU) Distinguished Accelerated Nursing Student for the Class of 2013 and will soon be published in a respected nursing journal. Sanchez has been accepted into NYU’s adult primary care nurse practitioner dual-degree program, and plans to work in an acute care setting before returning to school to complete his master’s degree.

He is just one of more than 3,000 nursing students who have been supported by New Careers in Nursing (NCIN), and a program of the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation and the American Association of Colleges of Nursing.

Luis and his peers are exactly what we hope the future of the nursing workforce will look like: capable, culturally-competent nurses who bring diverse and valuable perspectives to the field, and are prepared to meet the challenges of a changing health care system and patient population.

Read More

Jun 25 2013
Comments

Sharing Nursing’s Knowledge: The June 2013 Issue

Have you signed up to receive Sharing Nursing’s Knowledge? The monthly Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF) e-newsletter will keep you up to date on the work of RWJF’s nursing programs, and the latest news, research, and trends relating to academic progression, leadership, and other critically important nursing issues.  These are some of the stories in the June issue:

Treating Depression in Single Black Mothers
After seeing firsthand the impact of depression on single Black mothers, New Jersey Nursing Scholar Rahshida Atkins, PhD, FNP-BC, wanted to know more about the cultural and psychosocial factors that contribute to this problem. Her research led her to conclude that anger, stress, perceived racism, and low self-esteem are linked to the development of depressive symptoms among participants in her study. Atkins used the findings to develop a theory to guide nursing research and practice in the area. Health care providers, she hopes, will be able to use her theory to better understand the causes of depression in this population and make more informed recommendations for treatment and prevention.

Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Announces $20 Million Grant to Support Nurse PhD Scientists
RWJF recently announced an ambitious new program designed to dramatically increase the number of PhD-prepared nurses in the United States. The Foundation is investing $20 million in the new Future of Nursing Scholars program to support some of the country’s best and brightest nurses as they pursue their PhDs and become scientists, leaders, and faculty. RWJF is also working to identify and cultivate other philanthropies to join the effort, and the Independence Blue Cross Foundation announced that it is the first to sign on.

Read More

Jun 17 2013
Comments

Life-Changing Fellowship Spurred Me to Pursue Advanced Nursing Degree

Imani Baker is an alumna of Project L/EARN, a graduate education preparation program supported by the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF). She recently earned her bachelor’s degree in public health from Rutgers, the State University of New Jersey, and plans to become a nurse practitioner.

file

The two words that I can use to describe my journey through Project L/EARN are: life changing. 

I learned about the RWJF-funded program from an advisor who referred me to its faculty program director, Jane Miller, PhD. Dr. Miller warned me that the program would be “intense” and “much more work than you are used to.”

However, there are no words that could have ever prepared me for what I was about to experience that summer. Before I was admitted to Project L/EARN, I was not confident in my abilities to compete outside of my comfort zone, which included subjects specifically related to the health sciences.

This program forced me to face many of my weaknesses and confront my worst fears head on. Each day, I was overwhelmed with self-doubt. I was not the best public speaker; I struggled in statistics; and there were times when I questioned why I was picked for the program.

I said to myself, “I want to be a nurse. I don’t want to sit behind a computer and look at numbers all day. What did I get myself into?” However, my mentor, Dr. Judith Lucas, EdD, RN, GCNS-BC, taught me why it was so important for nurses to be involved in research and to have advanced graduate degrees.

Read More