Category Archives: Supportive housing

Nov 7 2013
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Human Capital News Roundup: Cost of care, cash for clunkers, secure housing, and more.

Around the country, print, broadcast, and online media outlets are covering the groundbreaking work of Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF) leaders, scholars, fellows, alumni, and grantees. Some recent examples:

In a New York Times op-ed, Peter Ubel, MD, examines the need for physicians to incorporate the cost of care into treatment conversations with patients. Ubel is an RWJF Generalist Physician Faculty Scholar and an RWJF Investigator Award in Health Policy Research recipient. “[T]he financial burden of paying for medical care can cause more distress in patients’ lives than many medical side effects,” he writes. Read more about Ubel’s views.

In lieu of expanding Medicaid under the Affordable Care Act, Pennsylvania Governor Tom Corbett proposes to direct low-income residents to insurance marketplaces to purchase state-subsidized private plans. In a Philly.com op-ed, David Grande, MD, MPA, discusses whether the plan will cost more than traditional Medicaid. Grande is the associate director of the RWJF Clinical Scholars program and an alumnus of the RWJF Health & Society Scholars program.

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Jan 2 2013
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Housing is Health Care

Kelly Doran, MD, is an emergency physician and a Robert Wood Johnson Foundation/U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs Clinical Scholar at Yale University. This post is part of the "Health Care in 2013" series.

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Around this time of year I think a lot about my friend Hank.  He is one of only two people to whom I reliably send a Christmas card each year, and just as reliably I receive a holiday package from him containing thoughtfully chosen gifts.

When I first met Hank he was homeless, living out of a van he parked near Golden Gate Park in San Francisco.  Hank had multiple serious chronic medical conditions, and the homelessness certainly did not help any.  He was very sick and, sadly, though he was barely 50 years old I thought he had maybe five years left, tops. Well, 10 years have passed and Hank is still ringing in the New Year… in his own apartment.  This is no Christmas miracle, but rather a predictable result of supportive housing.

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