Category Archives: Continuing education

Jul 16 2014
Comments

Fourteen Nursing Schools to Receive Grants

The Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF) has announced the first 14 schools of nursing selected to receive grants to support nurses as they pursue their PhDs. Each of the inaugural grantees of the Future of Nursing Scholars program will select one or more students to receive financial support, mentoring, and leadership development over the three years during which they pursue their PhDs.

The Future of Nursing Scholars program is a multi-funder initiative. In addition to RWJF, United Health Foundation, Independence Blue Cross Foundation, Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, and the Rhode Island Foundation are supporting grants this year.

The program plans to support up to 100 PhD nursing candidates over its first two years.

In its landmark future of nursing report, the Institute of Medicine recommended that the country double the number of nurses with doctorates in order to support more nurse leaders, promote nurse-led science and discovery, and address the nurse faculty shortage. Right now, fewer than 30,000 nurses in the United States have doctoral degrees in nursing or a related field. 

Read More

May 30 2014
Comments

Sharing Nursing’s Knowledge: The May 2014 Issue

Have you signed up to receive Sharing Nursing’s Knowledge? The monthly Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF) e-newsletter will keep you up to date on the work of the Foundation’s nursing programs, and the latest news, research, and trends relating to academic progression, leadership, and other essential nursing issues. Following are some of the stories in the May issue.

Nursing Job Outlook Sunny

Nursing graduates can take heart from long-term projections that show they have one of the hottest degrees around. The U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics projects that more than half a million positions for registered nurses (RNs) will open between 2012 and 2022. An additional 525,000 nurses will be needed to replace those leaving the field. However, experts say that regional variations in employment opportunities for nurses should be expected. The outlook is especially good for nurses with bachelor’s degrees in nursing (BSNs) and higher.

Study: Nursing School Diversity Initiatives Mostly Successful

Do “pipeline programs” aimed at increasing student diversity in nursing schools actually work? The answer is ‘Yes...but,’ according to a study led by J. Margo Brooks Carthon, PhD, APRN, an alumnus of the RWJF New Connections program and an RWJF Nurse Faculty Scholar. Her study found that significantly more Latino and Asian students enrolled in nursing schools with pipeline programs than without, but enrollment among Native American and Alaskan Indian students decreased at pipeline schools.

Read More

May 28 2014
Comments

My Greatest Reward: Watching High School Seniors Grow into University-Level Nursing Students

Kelly Andrews Cleaton, MAEd, is a Student Success Advocate (SSA) in eastern North Carolina for Regionally Increasing Baccalaureate Nurses (RIBN), which aims to improve the health and health outcomes of North Carolinians by increasing the educational preparation and diversity of the nursing workforce. RIBN is supported by Partners Investing in Nursing’s Future, a partnership of the Northwest Health Foundation and the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF) to support the capacity, involvement, and leadership of local foundations to advance the nursing profession in their own communities, and by Academic Progression in Nursing (APIN), an RWJF-supported initiative to advance state and regional strategies to create a more highly educated nursing workforce.

file

I began my career as a first grade teacher because I love working with students and watching them grow over time. The next stop in my career was at East Carolina University (ECU), where I worked with students who wanted to become teachers. During my work there, I decided that I really enjoyed watching older students develop into their professions.

Quite by accident one day, I saw an online advertisement for a position as an SSA for RIBN, and it seemed like the perfect fit for me. I absolutely love traveling to high schools in eastern North Carolina and being able to talk to students about the RIBN program. The excited look in their eyes when I tell them there is an affordable way to get their bachelor of science in nursing (BSN) degree is priceless. I enjoy working with five community colleges and putting everything together like the pieces of a puzzle.

Read More

May 27 2014
Comments

52 Schools of Nursing to Provide 400 Scholarships Through RWJF’s New Careers in Nursing Program

The Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF) today announced awards to 52 schools of nursing that will comprise the final cohort of its prestigious New Careers in Nursing Scholarship Program (NCIN). In the upcoming academic year, the schools will use these grants to support traditionally underrepresented students who are making a career switch to nursing through an accelerated baccalaureate or master’s degree program. NCIN is a program of RWJF and the American Association of Colleges of Nursing.

Each NCIN Scholar has already earned a bachelor’s degree in another field, and is making a transition to nursing through an accelerated nursing degree program, which prepares students to assume the role of  registered nurse in as little as 12-18 months.

In addition to a $10,000 scholarship, NCIN scholars receive other support to help them meet the demands of an accelerated degree program. All NCIN grantee schools maintain leadership and mentoring programs for their scholars, as well as a pre-entry immersion program to help them succeed.

Read More

May 15 2014
Comments

RWJF Scholars in the News: Budget cuts and babies’ health, nurse engineers, and more.

Around the country, print, broadcast, and online media outlets are covering the groundbreaking work of Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF) leaders, scholars, fellows, alumni, and grantees. Some recent examples:

New research led by RWJF Clinical Scholar Nicole Brown, MD, MPH, suggests that children with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) are more likely to be from families affected by such stressors as poverty, divorce, neighborhood violence, or substance abuse, HealthDay reports. Researchers analyzed survey responses from parents of more than 65,000 children. Approximately 12 percent of the children had been diagnosed with ADHD, and their parents reported higher rates of those stressors than other respondents. “Knowledge about the prevalence and types of adverse experiences among children diagnosed with ADHD may guide efforts to address trauma in this population and improve ADHD screening, diagnostic accuracy and management," Brown said. The HealthDay article was republished in Philly.com, U.S. News & World Report, and WebMD.

RWJF Nurse Faculty Scholar Betty Bekemeier, PhD, MPH, RN, examined 11 years of data on budget cuts at 100 county health departments in Washington state and Florida in order to understand and quantify how the cuts affected children’s health, My Northwest (Washington) reports. She focused on the impact of funding reductions to such services as the Women, Infants and Children program and nutrition advice for mothers. Bekemeier found a direct correlation between budget cuts for such programs and the number of low birthweight babies. Children born with low birthweight, she notes, often have greater health care needs that may end up costing counties as much or more than the money saved by the original budget cuts.

Duquesne University is pioneering the nation’s first dual degree in nursing and biomedical engineering this fall, according to the Tribune-Review (Pittsburgh). Mary Ellen Glasgow, PhD, RN, ACNS-BC, dean and professor of the Duquesne University School of Nursing, said the dual major will provide engineers with hands-on clinical experience in patient care that will give them a better perspective on the practical applications of solutions to health care problems. “We aren’t going to be putting out millions of nurse engineers,” Glasgow, an RWJF Executive Nurse Fellow, said, predicting that nurse engineers will help pioneer advances and efficiencies in health care through their direct experience with patient care.

Read More

May 13 2014
Comments

An RWJF New Jersey Nursing Scholar on Why She Wants to Be a Nurse Leader

National Nurses Week just ended, but several nurses are continuing the conversation, blogging about the reasons they aspire to leadership. Jenee Skinner-Hamler, DNP, RN, FNP, completed her master of science degree at the Rutgers School of Nursing as a Robert Wood Johnson Foundation New Jersey Nursing Initiative (NJNI) New Jersey Nursing Scholar, and received additional support from NJNI to pursue her doctor of nursing practice (DNP) degree at Wilkes University.

file

Becoming a nurse leader permits me to give voice to help bridge theory and practice by reflecting on educational and practical learning. Nurse leaders help to shape the next generation of nurses. With that being said, why wouldn’t I desire to become a nurse leader? Having a voice helps not just myself, but others to overcome setbacks while constantly thinking of solutions in nursing.

Throughout my nursing career, I have had the opportunity to function as a team leader on a critical care unit. Functioning in such a capacity requires that I engage my co-workers, while at the same time balancing my own ambitions and competence. Nurse leaders broadcast their knowledge and skills, and then share their knowledge with their co-workers, to improve patient outcomes. To become a nurse leader, one must possess a passion for learning.

Read More

May 5 2014
Comments

Sharing Nursing’s Knowledge: The April 2014 Issue

Have you signed up to receive Sharing Nursing’s Knowledge? The monthly Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF) e-newsletter will keep you up to date on the work of the Foundation’s nursing programs, and the latest news, research, and trends relating to academic progression, leadership, and other essential nursing issues. Following are some of the stories in the April issue.

Consumers Benefit from Expanded APRN Practice, FTC Says
In March, the Federal Trade Commission (FTC)—the government agency that works to protect consumers and prevent anti-competitive business practices—released Policy Perspectives: Competition and the Regulation of Advanced Practice Nurses. It warns that barriers to advanced practice registered nurse (APRN) practice could reduce the kind of free-market competition in the health care industry that benefits consumers. The report also says APRNs play a “critical role” in alleviating shortages of primary care providers.

Building a Community of Nurse Scientists
Ann Cashion, PhD, RN, FAAN, has been hooked on the promise and potential of genetics and genomics in nursing since the first survey of the human genome was completed in 2000. She participated in the inaugural cohort of the Summer Genetics Institute at the National Institute of Nursing Research (NINR), and it changed the trajectory of her career. Now, 14 years later, Cashion is NINR’s newly appointed scientific director. She is also an alumna of the RWJF Executive Nurse Fellows program.

Read More

Apr 11 2014
Comments

Academic Progression is Focus of Meeting with Community College, University Nursing Leaders

A year ago this week, the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF) convened an unprecedented meeting that brought together diverse leaders from community colleges around the country, the Tri-Council for Nursing, and RWJF’s Academic Progression in Nursing (APIN) initiative, which is fostering collaboration between community colleges and four-year university nursing programs to promote seamless academic progression for nurses. The meeting was organized to address concerns in the community college community about the recommendation in the Institute of Medicine’s (IOM) report, The Future of Nursing: Leading Change, Advancing Health, that 80 percent of the nation’s nurses attain bachelor of science in nursing or higher degrees by the year 2020.

A paper, released today, reports on the proceedings of that meeting, including participants’ shared goal to ensure that community colleges continue their invaluable work to educate a new generation of nurses and diversify the nursing workforce; and to give all nurses opportunities to be lifelong learners who are well-prepared to provide high-quality care and promote health.

The paper includes an addendum that provides news and information about how nursing, health, education, government, business, and other leaders in nine states have made exciting progress in the last year in support of seamless progression for nursing students, as well as for nurses already in the workforce who wish to continue their education.

“While we did not solve every concern, the meeting was tremendously constructive, opening a dialogue, identifying numerous areas of strong agreement, and illuminating issues yet to be resolved,” said John Lumpkin, MD, MPH, senior vice president at RWJF. The Foundation “is determined that last year’s meeting be a beginning for a continuing, constructive dialogue that will advance the goals we all share.”

Read More

Mar 31 2014
Comments

Developing New Partners: The Future of Nursing Scholars Program

Susan B. Hassmiller, PhD, RN, FAAN, is co-director of the Future of Nursing Scholars Program and senior adviser for nursing for the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF). The Future of Nursing Scholars program’s call for proposals will close on April 15. It is open to schools of nursing with research-focused PhD programs. The schools that receive awards will select the scholars to support.

file

I started my nursing career at a community college. It was a terrific experience that left me as prepared as I could be for my beginning staff nurse role. I quickly discovered that I wanted and needed to know more, however, so I returned to school. Over the next several years, I earned a PhD in nursing administration and health policy. It was difficult but incredibly rewarding and has led to a career I could never have imagined when I started out, including serving as a faculty member at the University of Nebraska and George Mason University. That experience has made me want to “pay it forward”—to pay homage to the nurses who mentored and encouraged me on my journey.

Serving as co-director of the Future of Nursing Scholars program is part of my personal mission to help other nurses who want to follow the same path. It also is a big part of RWJF’s extraordinary, long-term support for the nursing profession, which advances the Foundation’s mission to improve health and health care, and build a culture of health in this country.   

Supporting nurses seeking PhD degrees is tremendously important. Because nurses have vast experience working directly with patients and families, we are positioned to help make care safer, more accessible, and higher quality. In particular, PhD-prepared nurse scientists and researchers are in a unique position to identify solutions that make a real difference to patients and families. But, as the Institute of Medicine (IOM) noted in its landmark report, The Future of Nursing: Leading Change, Advancing Health, the country will need many more PhD-prepared nurses in coming years.

Read More

Mar 19 2014
Comments

New Charting Nursing’s Future Brief: Patient Safety Through Workplace Transformation

Ten years ago, a report from the Institute of Medicine (IOM) proposed a transformation of nurses’ workplaces, warning that “The typical work environment of nurses is characterized by many serious threats to patient safety.” The latest issue of the Charting Nursing’s Future policy brief series from the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF) focuses on how much has changed in the intervening years, and how much remains to be done.

The new brief identifies a series of initiatives designed by and for nurses that have “spurred the creation of work environments that foster health care quality and patient safety.” Among them:

  • The RWJF-backed Transforming Care at the Bedside (TCAB) initiative, developed in collaboration with the Institute for Healthcare Improvement, which seeks to empower frontline nurses to address quality and safety issues on their units, in contrast with more common, top-down improvement efforts. TCAB is now integrated with Aligning Forces for Quality (AF4Q), RWJF’s signature effort to improve the quality of health care and reduce disparities in targeted communities.

  • Another RWJF-backed project, Quality and Safety Education for Nurses (QSEN), focuses on nursing school faculty, and has helped prepare thousands teaching in graduate and undergraduate programs to integrate quality and safety competencies into nursing school curricula.

  • On the policy side, efforts have been made to further examine and improve the adequacy of nurse staffing. For example, a number of jurisdictions, including California, Illinois, Washington state, and Minnesota, have adopted standards that either require or encourage limits on how many patients a given nurse may be assigned to care for in acute care hospitals. Subsequent research has demonstrated an impact on hospital policies, but evidence of improvements in cost, quality, and safety is mixed so far.

  • A number of institutions, including Vanderbilt University Medical Center in Nashville and The Johns Hopkins Hospital in Baltimore, have taken aim at disruptive behavior and professional discourtesy in the workplace, noting that, given the growing importance of teamwork and collaboration, the consequences of such misbehavior can be “monumental when patients’ lives are at stake.”

Read More