Category Archives: Health Care Education and Training

Dec 9 2014
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Rare Mettle

For the 25th anniversary of the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation’s (RWJF) Summer Medical and Dental Education Program (SMDEP), the Human Capital Blog is publishing scholar profiles, some reprinted from the program’s website. SMDEP is a six-week academic enrichment program that has created a pathway for more than 22,000 participants, opening the doors to life-changing opportunities. Following is a profile of Rachel Torrez, MD, a member of the Class of 1990.

Rachel Torrez

The year was 1992. Rachel Torrez, a second-year medical student, was in line waiting for coffee at the University of Washington when a White male student confronted her.

“You took my best friend’s spot because of quotas,” he sneered.

The granddaughter of Mexican migrant workers, Torrez enrolled at a time when students of color were few and some people—especially in Washington state—were questioning the fairness of affirmative action. Clarence Thomas, an outspoken opponent of affirmation action, had recently joined the Supreme Court.

“We don’t have quotas,” Torrez shot back. “I took your best friend’s spot because I was smarter.”

That mix of brains and backbone is characteristic of Torrez, who conquered severe dyslexia and cultural constraints on her way to an MD. Now a family-practice physician in the Ballard neighborhood of Seattle, Torrez gives as good as she gets.

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Nov 26 2014
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Sharing Nursing’s Knowledge: The November 2014 Issue

Have you signed up to receive Sharing Nursing’s Knowledge? The monthly Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF) e-newsletter will keep you up to date on the work of the Foundation’s nursing programs, and the latest news, research and trends relating to academic progression, leadership and other essential nursing issues. Following are some of the stories in the November issue.

RWJF Grantees Help Veterans Become Nurses
With unemployment a problem for many veterans, nurse educators are launching innovative programs to turn veterans into nurses—a “win-win” solution for the military, the health care system and patients, proponents say. The programs address both the looming nurse shortage and the fact that veterans cannot get academic credit for health care experiences that took place in the battlefield.

‘Ebola Care is Nursing Care’
The Ebola outbreak is shining a spotlight on the critical—but often unseen—work of nursing in the United States and abroad, nurse leaders say. Nurses are mounting the main caregiving response to the deadly virus, according to Sheila Davis, DNP, ANP-BC, FAAN, an RWJF Executive Nurse Fellow who recently returned from Liberia and Sierra Leone. Nurses also are educating the public about how the disease is transmitted and dispelling sometimes-unfounded fears.

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Nov 24 2014
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Conference to Focus on Integrating Policy into Nursing Curricula

The Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF) Nursing and Health Policy Collaborative at the University of New Mexico is hosting a one-day conference this winter for PhD and DNP nurse faculty who seek to better integrate health policy into their curricula. It will be held on January 27 at the Hotel Del Coronado in San Diego.

Hotel Del Coronado The Hotel Del Coronado in San Diego

The conference will feature interprofessional panels of speakers who will discuss strategies to develop faculty and student expertise in policy analysis and research. Panel topics will include:

  • shaping health policy leadership through doctoral nurse education;
  • exercising health policy leadership through nursing and community organizations;
  • strategies for enriching doctoral health policy education; and
  • integrating health policy content into doctoral nursing programs.

The conference supports RWJF’s work to promote a Culture of Health across America. It aims to support faculty in preparing students to address health policy issues, developing programs of research that relate to health policy, and integrating an understanding of social determinants of health into policy analysis and research.

More information on the conference is here and registration is here.

Nov 21 2014
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The Legacy of PIN: Strengthening Long-Term Care in Arkansas

Chris Love, MMin, MSLE, is the program director for the Arkansas Community Foundation, which served as the lead foundation for the Partners Investing in Nursing’s Future (PIN) project, Planning for Workforce Development in Geriatric and Long-Term Care.

PIN Logo

As PIN holds its final national meeting this week, the Human Capital Blog is featuring posts from PIN partners about the program’s legacy of encouraging innovative collaborative responses to challenges facing the nursing workforce in local communities. PIN is an initiative of the Northwest Health Foundation and the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF).

Chris Love

The PIN journey with Arkansas Community Foundation and University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences (UAMS), among other partners, has been one of both providence and progress. It was in the fall of 2008 that we were approached by leaders from UAMS with the idea for us to become partners with them in this endeavor.

At first, the idea seemed daunting. Then, after some consideration by our senior leadership, it became an open door for opportunity—an opportunity to leverage the structure and resources of our foundation to complement the expertise of our colleagues and friends at UAMS to address a major issue of mutual concern: the aging population in our state and the significant shortage of adequately prepared nurses to care for that population. Not long into the partnership, our organizations realized this would be a match made in heaven.

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Nov 11 2014
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Stony Brook Helps Veterans Become Nurses

Lori Escallier, PhD, RN, CPNP, is a professor and associate dean for evaluation and outcomes at the State University of New York at Stony Brook School of Nursing. She is her university’s project director for a program that helps veterans earn baccalaureate degrees in nursing (VBSN) and for New Careers in Nursing, a program supported by the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF) and the American Association of Colleges of Nursing (AACN) that supports second-career nurses in accelerated master’s and baccalaureate nursing programs.

Lori Escallier

Human Capital Blog: Please tell us about your university’s program for nursing students who are veterans.

Lori Escallier: The project is entitled Enhancing the Nursing Workforce: Career Ladder Opportunities for Veterans. The purpose is to increase the enrollment, retention and educational success of veterans in the baccalaureate nursing program at Stony Brook. Our program operationalizes the collaborative efforts of the Health Resources and Services Administration, the Department of Defense, and the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) by providing opportunities for veterans to transition into nursing careers.

HCB: How is the VBSN program helping to build a Culture of Health that more effectively serves veterans?

Escallier: One of the project’s aims is to enhance the nursing workforce with veterans. Veterans certainly have a good understanding of the needs of other veterans and their families. Who better to promote a Culture of Health for veterans than those who have “walked the walk?”

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Nov 7 2014
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Recent Research About Nursing, November 2014

This is part of the November 2014 issue of Sharing Nursing’s Knowledge.

DNP Programs Increasing

New research by the RAND Corporation, conducted for the American Association of Colleges of Nursing (AACN), finds that the percentage and number of nursing schools offering doctorates in nursing practice (DNPs) has increased dramatically in recent years, but that some schools still face barriers to adopting programs that confer the degree.

Ten years ago, AACN member schools endorsed a call for moving the level of preparation necessary for advanced nursing practice from the masters to doctoral level, establishing a target of 2015. More recently, the Institute of Medicine’s landmark report on the future of nursing called for doubling the number of doctorally prepared nurses in order to help meet the demands of an ever more complex health care system.

According to RAND’s data, nursing schools are following through. Since 2006, the number of schools offering DNP degrees has grown by more than 1,000 percent, from 20 schools in 2006 to 251 in 2013.

The report finds that approximately 30 percent of nursing schools with Advanced Practice Registered Nursing (APRN) programs now offer degree paths in which baccalaureate-prepared nurses move directly to DNP programs, and that such BSN-DNP programs will likely be in another fifth of nursing schools with APRN programs in a few years.

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Nov 3 2014
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Achieving Impossible Dreams

For the 25th anniversary of the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation’s Summer Medical and Dental Education Program (SMDEP), the Human Capital Blog is publishing scholar profiles, some reprinted from the program’s website. SMDEP is a six-week academic enrichment program that has created a pathway for more than 22,000 participants, opening the doors to life-changing opportunities. Following is a profile of Gloria Sanchez, MD, a member of the 1993 class.

Gloria Sanchez, MD Gloria Sanchez, MD

Can a person thrive in a community ravaged by poverty? Are seemingly impossible dreams attainable?

Gloria Sanchez, MD, grapples with these questions every day, both in her medical practice and while teaching aspiring physicians.

Sanchez is associate program director of the Department of Family Medicine at Harbor–UCLA Medical Center, a publicly funded hospital in Los Angeles. She also oversees UCLA’s PRIME MSIII Primary Care Longitudinal course, which trains medical students to be medical leaders in underserved communities.

The lives of patients Sanchez treats are shaped by social determinants of health—forces that dictate poor health outcomes based on ZIP code more than genetic code. Where you live, work, and play has a profound effect on individual, family, and community health, she says.

“How can someone who doesn’t have a level playing field still attain their goals?” she asks, citing research showing that the stress of social and economic disadvantage contributes to chronic disease. “Poverty can literally change your brain, and your health.”

Noting that Harbor–UCLA Family Medicine’s mission is to advocate for disenfranchised populations, Sanchez says, “That’s why I entered medicine. It may sound impossible, but I’m here to help people attain good health so they can achieve their dreams.”

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Oct 31 2014
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An Anthropological Approach to Medicine

Theresa Yera is a senior at the State University of New York (SUNY) at Buffalo. A project of the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF), the Institute for Health, Health Care Policy and Aging Research, and Rutgers University, Project L/EARN is a 10-week summer internship that provides training, experience and mentoring to undergraduate college students from socioeconomic, ethnic and cultural groups that traditionally have been underrepresented in graduate education.

Theresa Yera

When I applied to the 2014 Project L/EARN cohort, I was seeking exposure to anthropological research that would lead me into a career of public health service. I wanted to pursue L/EARN because of my strong interest in anthropology and medicine. My previous experience in health care included studying for the Emergency Medical Technician (EMT) examinations, volunteering as a Campus Health Educator (CHE), and participating in qualitative and quantitative research projects for almost three years.

The training as an EMT introduced me to patient and health care provider interaction and raised questions on streamlining the process. It also trained me to think critically and quickly, sharpen my leadership skills, and develop interview questions. Patients complained of many chronic and acute health problems that stemmed from their health behaviors and environment. The CHE initiative led me to value a community approach for health problems. In CHE, I worked to end racial disparities in organ donation and increase awareness of the need for organ donation and a healthy lifestyle. I met many individuals with personal stories that explained why they either did or did not want to donate.

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Oct 31 2014
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RWJF Milestones, October 2014

The following are among the many honors received recently by Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF) leaders, scholars, fellows, grantees and alumni:

Linda Aiken, PhD, FAAN, FRCN, RN, has won the Institute of Medicine’s Leinhard Award in recognition of her “rigorous research demonstrating the importance of nursing care and work environments in achieving safe, effective, patient-centered, and affordable health care.” The director of the Center for Health Outcomes and Policy Research at the University of Pennsylvania School of Nursing, Aiken serves on the National Advisory Committee of the RWJF Interdisciplinary Nursing Quality Research Initiative and is a research manager for the Future of Nursing National Research Agenda.

A number of RWJF Scholars and Fellows were recently elected to membership in the Institute of Medicine:

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Oct 30 2014
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RWJF Scholars in the News: Scapegoating EHRs, Ebola fears, children fighting cancer, and more.

Around the country, print, broadcast and online media outlets are covering the groundbreaking work of Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF) leaders, scholars, fellows, alumni and grantees. Some recent examples:

In an article published in Healthcare IT News, David Blumenthal, MD, MPP, writes that health care providers may be too quick to blame Electronic Health Records (EHR) for medical errors. Blumenthal notes that EHRs are still imperfect and that improvements will take time, but argues: “There is no going back in the electronic health information revolution. No physician or hospital, however loud their complaints, has ever thrown out their EHR and returned to paper. The dissatisfaction with the technology will recede as EHRs improve, and as a new generation of young clinicians, raised in the electronic world, populates our health care system.”  Blumenthal is president of The Commonwealth Fund, former National Coordinator for Health Information Technology, and an RWJF Investigator Award in Health Policy Research recipient.

In a blog published by the Washington Post’s “Monkey Cage,” Shana Gadarian, PhD, and her co-author write that Ebola anxiety, while potentially misplaced and harmful, is likely to have an impact on whom Americans trust to handle the disease and what kinds of policies they will support to fight it. The authors have studies society’s reactions to small pox and H1N1 flu. “In general we find that anxiety makes people more supportive of government playing an expansive role in protecting them during a health crisis ... we think our study and the current Ebola outbreak both emphasize that people will rally around experts and increase their support for policies that fight the contagion, even if they hurt civil liberties. Let us hope that the U.S. health system is ultimately worthy of the confidence the public has in it.” Gadarian is an RWJF Scholars in Health Policy Research alumna.

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