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Nov 24 2014
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Reigniting the Push for Health Equity!

Daniel E. Dawes, JD, is a health care attorney and executive director of government relations, health policy and external affairs at Morehouse School of Medicine in Atlanta, Georgia; a lecturer of health law and policy at the Satcher Health Leadership Institute; and senior advisor for the Transdisciplinary Collaborative Center for Health Disparities Research. On December 5, the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF) will explore this topic further at its first Scholars Forum: Disparities, Resilience, and Building a Culture of Health. Learn more about it.

Scholars Forum 2014 Logo

With growing diversity relative to ethnicity and culture in our country, and with the failure to reduce or eliminate risk factors that can influence health and health outcomes, it is imperative that we identify, develop, promulgate, and implement health laws, policies, and programs that will advance health equity among vulnerable populations, including racial and ethnic minorities.

Daniel Dawes

Every year, the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality publishes its National Healthcare Quality and Disparities Report, which tracks inequities in health services in the United States. Since the report was first published in 2003, the findings have consistently shown that while we have made improvements in quality, we have not been as successful in reducing disparities in health care. This dichotomy has persisted, despite the fact that health care spending continues to rise. In fact, health care costs have been escalating at an unsustainable rate, reaching an estimated 17.3 percent of our gross domestic product in 2009, according to the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services. Despite these high costs, the delivery system remains fragmented and inequities in the quality of health care persist. The impact of disparities in health status and access for racial and ethnic minorities is quite alarming.

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Nov 24 2014
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Conference to Focus on Integrating Policy into Nursing Curricula

The Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF) Nursing and Health Policy Collaborative at the University of New Mexico is hosting a one-day conference this winter for PhD and DNP nurse faculty who seek to better integrate health policy into their curricula. It will be held on January 27 at the Hotel Del Coronado in San Diego.

Hotel Del Coronado The Hotel Del Coronado in San Diego

The conference will feature interprofessional panels of speakers who will discuss strategies to develop faculty and student expertise in policy analysis and research. Panel topics will include:

  • shaping health policy leadership through doctoral nurse education;
  • exercising health policy leadership through nursing and community organizations;
  • strategies for enriching doctoral health policy education; and
  • integrating health policy content into doctoral nursing programs.

The conference supports RWJF’s work to promote a Culture of Health across America. It aims to support faculty in preparing students to address health policy issues, developing programs of research that relate to health policy, and integrating an understanding of social determinants of health into policy analysis and research.

More information on the conference is here and registration is here.

Nov 21 2014
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Ebola as an Instrument of Discrimination

Jennifer Schroeder, Stephanie M. DeLong, Shannon Heintz, Maya Nadimpalli, Jennifer Yourkavitch, and Allison Aiello, PhD, MS, professor at the Gillings School of Global Public Health, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and an alumna of the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF) Health & Society Scholars program. This blog was developed under the guidance of Aiello’s social epidemiology seminar course.

Allison Aiello Allison Aiello

Ebola is an infectious disease that the world has seen before in more moderate outbreaks in Africa. As the devastating Ebola outbreak in West Africa has taken a global turn, fear, misinformation and long-standing stigma and discrimination have acted as major contributors to the epidemic and response. Stigma is a mark upon someone, whether visible or invisible, that society judgmentally acts upon. Ebola has become a significant source of stigma among West Africans and the Western world.

In many ways, the source of this discrimination can be traced back to the legacy of colonialism and the western approach to infectious disease response in Africa. The history of foreign humanitarian aid has sometimes dismissed cultural traditions and beliefs. As a consequence, trust in westerners has eroded and has been compounded by a disconnect between western humanitarian aid approaches and a lack of overall infrastructure investment on the part of African national health systems. This is apparent in the Ebola epidemic in West Africa. Some don’t actually think that Ebola exists; instead they believe that it is a hoax carried out by the Western world. All of these factors are facilitating the rapid spread of the disease.

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Nov 21 2014
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The Legacy of PIN: Strengthening Long-Term Care in Arkansas

Chris Love, MMin, MSLE, is the program director for the Arkansas Community Foundation, which served as the lead foundation for the Partners Investing in Nursing’s Future (PIN) project, Planning for Workforce Development in Geriatric and Long-Term Care.

PIN Logo

As PIN holds its final national meeting this week, the Human Capital Blog is featuring posts from PIN partners about the program’s legacy of encouraging innovative collaborative responses to challenges facing the nursing workforce in local communities. PIN is an initiative of the Northwest Health Foundation and the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF).

Chris Love

The PIN journey with Arkansas Community Foundation and University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences (UAMS), among other partners, has been one of both providence and progress. It was in the fall of 2008 that we were approached by leaders from UAMS with the idea for us to become partners with them in this endeavor.

At first, the idea seemed daunting. Then, after some consideration by our senior leadership, it became an open door for opportunity—an opportunity to leverage the structure and resources of our foundation to complement the expertise of our colleagues and friends at UAMS to address a major issue of mutual concern: the aging population in our state and the significant shortage of adequately prepared nurses to care for that population. Not long into the partnership, our organizations realized this would be a match made in heaven.

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Nov 20 2014
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The Legacy of PIN: Keeping the Pipeline Flowing

Bobbie D. Bagley, MS, RN, MPH, CPH, is director of public health and an instructor in the nursing program at Rivier University. She played a key role in the Partners Investing in Nursing’s Future (PIN) Pipeline Project. Paula Smith, MBA, is director of the Southern New Hampshire Area Health Education Center and is in the doctoral program in education, leadership and learning at Rivier University. She oversaw implementation of the Nursing Quest summer camps, the Diverse Nurse Network, and the Minority Nursing Student Support Program components of the Pipeline Project. 

PIN Logo

As PIN holds its final national meeting this week, the Human Capital Blog is featuring posts from PIN partners about the program’s legacy of encouraging innovative collaborative responses to challenges facing the nursing workforce in local communities. PIN is an initiative of the Northwest Health Foundation and the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF).

As New Hampshire becomes increasingly diverse, partners in the state have joined together to promote workforce diversity. These are exciting times. Support from RWJF and other funders provided the opportunity to implement the New Hampshire Nursing Diversity Pipeline Project—a partner-driven effort to increase diversity within the nursing workforce as well as nursing faculty. Lead partners included the Endowment for Health, the New Hampshire Office of Minority Health and Refugee Affairs, the BRINGIT!!! Program (Bringing Refugees, Immigrants and Neighbors, Gently Into Tomorrow—an after school enrichment program), and the Southern New Hampshire Area Health Education Center (AHEC). In addition, this Pipeline Program engaged partners from a variety of organizations in the state, including hospitals, medical practices, youth-serving organizations, middle and high schools, as well as nursing leaders in practice and academia.

In addition, this Pipeline Program engaged partners from a variety of organizations in the state, including hospitals, medical practices, youth-serving organizations, middle and high schools, as well as nursing leaders in practice and academia.

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Nov 20 2014
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The Legacy of PIN: An Urban-Rural Model to Increase the Number of Baccalaureate Nurses

Darlene Curley, MS, RN, FAAN, is executive director of the Jonas Center for Nursing and Veterans Healthcare, which served as the lead foundation for the Partners Investing in Nursing’s Future (PIN) project, Regionally Increasing Baccalaureate Nurses (RIBN).

As PIN holds its final national meeting this week, the Human Capital Blog is featuring posts from PIN partners about the program’s legacy of encouraging innovative collaborative responses to challenges facing the nursing workforce in local communities. PIN is an initiative of the Northwest Health Foundation and the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF).

PIN Logo
Darlene Curley

Human Capital Blog: Why did the Jonas Center decide to become a part of PIN? What were your goals for the project?

Darlene Curley: There were three things that were attractive about PIN. First, there was this project itself, which was developing a pathway for associate degree to baccalaureate nurses. That’s critical for building a highly educated workforce and a pipeline for preparing the next generation of faculty. The second reason was the partnership funding model. It related to the Jonas Center’s philosophy that we should be funding projects together with others in nursing, but also in interdisciplinary models for health. The third reason was the process of bringing stakeholders together in regions, which was critical. We knew that if we could bring nurse educators, students and other stakeholders together to work on the RIBN project, that group could stay together and work on other projects that were important to nursing and health care as they came along. The third reason was the process of bringing stakeholders together in regions, which was critical. We knew that if we could bring nurse educators, students and other stakeholders together to work on the RIBN project, that group could stay together and work on other projects that were important to nursing and health care as they came along.

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Nov 19 2014
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The Imperative to Improve Health Literacy

Joy P. Deupree, PhD, MSN, APRN-BC, is an assistant professor at the University of Alabama (UAB) School of Nursing and a Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF) Executive Nurse Fellow. She is engaged in community participatory research studies on health literacy. For 12 years, Deupree has taught a campus-wide elective on health literacy and has been a guest lecturer on the topic at the UAB schools of medicine, dentistry and public health. She founded the Alliance of International Nurses for Improved Health Literacy and established a nursing special interest group for the Health Literacy Annual Research Conference.

Joy Deupree

Health literacy is extremely important to building a culture of health. Basic understanding of health care information is essential if people are to live healthy lives, but an alarming number of American adults report poor understanding of health care instructions. 

This year marks the 10-year anniversary of the Institute of Medicine (IOM) report, Health Literacy: A Prescription to End Confusion.While progress has been made, the work has really just begun. We can no longer blame the patient for poor health literacy, and we should keep in mind that limited health literacy affects us as all and contributes to increased health care costs. 

American Public Health Association Meeting & Expo

The IOM report defines health literacy as “the degree to which individuals have the capacity to obtain, process and understand basic health information and services needed to make appropriate health decisions.” These skills involve not only reading ability but also numeracy. Failure to develop the necessary skills to manage health care can cost millions of dollars as well as add to human suffering and even cause death.

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Nov 19 2014
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Population Sickness and Population Health: How Geographic Determinants Differ

Tamara G.J. Leech, PhD, is an associate professor in the Department of Social and Behavioral Sciences at the Indiana University Richard M. Fairbanks School of Public Health, and a former Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF) New Connections program grantee. She is principal investigator of a William T. Grant Scholar Award, “Pockets of Peace: Investigating Urban Neighborhoods Resilient to Adolescent Violence.”  

Tamara G. Leech

I am particularly excited about the American Public Health Association’s (APHA) Annual Meeting theme this year—Healthography! My research team has spent the past two years examining “cold spots” of urban youth violence. In other words, we have been analyzing areas where—regardless of the increased risk for violence—violence is not occurring or is rarely occurring. This is a departure from the dominant form of research on “hot spots” of violence, or any disease for that matter.  

American Public Health Association Meeting & Expo

For some, this approach has been puzzling. It’s not immediately obvious that the determinants of cold spots are not simply the opposite of the determinants of hot spots.  However, our evidence clearly suggests that the things that help to make a location healthy go well beyond the things that protect a location from high rates of illness.

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Nov 18 2014
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The Stuff That Is Killing Us

Ronald M. Wyatt, MD, MHA, is medical director in the Division of Healthcare Improvement at The Joint Commission. In this role, he promotes quality improvement and patient safety to internal and external audiences, works to influence public policy and legislation for patient safety improvements, and serves as the lead patient safety information and education resource within The Joint Commission. On December 5, RWJF will explore this topic further at its first Scholars Forum: Disparities, Resilience, and Building a Culture of Health. Learn more about it.

Ron Wyatt

I first met Don Erwin, MD, in 2010. He was CEO of the St. Thomas Clinic in New Orleans. I sought him out on the recommendation of the CEO of the Institute for Health Care Improvement (IHI), Donald Berwick, MD. I was a fellow of the IHI, and Berwick and I had conversed about inequities in the U.S. health care system. He advised me to travel to New Orleans to speak with Erwin, who would give me insight that would be important to the project that I was working on: “Disparity in the Deep South.”

Scholars Forum 2014 Logo

Erwin was very welcoming and asked why I was there.  In a very academic tone, I told him that I was there to better understand the non-medical determinants of health. With a semi-puzzled look on his face, Erwin asked what I meant. Now I became puzzled and a bit uncomfortable. My response was that I was interested in learning more about the role of social determinants on health.  Erwin said, “Ron, I am not sure what you are talking about.” 

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Nov 18 2014
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On Balance and Contrast

For the 25th anniversary of the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation’s Summer Medical and Dental Education Program (SMDEP), the Human Capital Blog is publishing scholar profiles, some reprinted from the program’s website. SMDEP is a six-week academic enrichment program that has created a pathway for more than 22,000 participants, opening the doors to life-changing opportunities. Following is a profile of Nicole Stern, MD, member of the class of 1991.

Nicole Stern, MD Nicole Stern, MD

First, there’s her heritage: her father is Jewish, her mother full-blooded Mescalero Apache. Then there’s her training: Stern is board certified in internal medicine and sports medicine. And as a woman practicing sports medicine, she is an uncommon presence in a male-dominated profession.

“I certainly have a lot of dual things in my life,” she muses.

Stern’s cultural background gives her a unique vantage point on health care, particularly the disproportionate number of Native versus non-Native practitioners. According to the Association of American Medical Colleges, American Indians represent less than 1 percent of physicians.

As president of the Association of American Indian Physicians (AAIP) from 2012 to 2013, Stern pushed to increase the pipeline of American Indian and Alaska Native medical students. She continues to support AAIP in reversing what she calls a “flatline” in applicants and matriculants from Native populations.

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