Category Archives: Public and Community Health

Dec 10 2014
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We Are All Tuskegee

Collins O. Airhihenbuwa, PhD, MPH, is professor and head of the Department of Biobehavioral Health at Penn State University. The first RWJF Scholars Forum: Disparities, Resilience, and Building a Culture of Health was held last week. The conversation continues here on the RWJF Human Capital Blog.

Scholars Forum 2014 Logo

As we address disparities and inequities, the challenge is to think about solutions and not simply defining the problem. Most would agree that health is the most important part of who we are. It is the first thing we think about in the morning when we greet one another by asking, “How are you this morning?” It is the last thing we think about at night when we wish someone a restful night.

Collins Airhihenbuwa

What may be different is what health means to us and our families. This is why place and context are important. How we think about health and what we choose to do about it is very much influenced by where we reside. Our place and related cultural differences about health are less about right or wrong and more about ways of relating and meeting expectations our families and communities may have of us, whether expressed or perceived. More than that is the way we relate to what our place means in terms of how it is defined and subsequently how that definition shapes how we define it for ourselves. In other words the ‘gate’ through which we talk about our place and ourselves is very important in having a conversation about who we are and what that means for our health.

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Nov 28 2014
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Lessons from the Arabbers of Baltimore

Maya M. Rockeymoore, PhD, is president of the Center for Global Policy Solutions, a nonprofit dedicated to making policy work for people and their environments, and director of Leadership for Healthy Communities, a national program of the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF). On December 5, RWJF will hold its first Scholars Forum: Disparities, Resilience, and Building a Culture of Health. Learn more.

Scholars Forum 2014 Logo

When I think of the resilience of disadvantaged communities disproportionately affected by health disparities, I think of the Arabbers of Baltimore, Md. They are not Arabic speaking people from the Middle East or North Africa, but scrappy African American entrepreneurs who started selling fresh foods in Baltimore’s underserved communities in the aftermath of the Civil War.

Maya Rockeymoore

Their relevance continued into the modern era as supermarkets divested from low-income neighborhoods, leaving struggling residents with few options aside from unhealthy fast food and carry-out restaurants. Driving horses with carts laden with colorful fresh fruits and vegetables, Arabbers sold their produce to residents literally starving for nutritious food.

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Nov 18 2014
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Research by RWJF Clinical Scholars Explores Antibiotic Overuse, Weight-Loss Smartphone Apps, More

New studies conducted by Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF) Clinical Scholars and published as part of a special November supplement of the Annals of Internal Medicine offer fresh insights on a range of topics, including: How hospitals can improve antibiotic prescribing practices; how a simple change to the format of electronic health records can encourage the use of money-saving generic drugs; how a lottery-based incentive program for patients could increase participation in colon cancer screening; and whether a popular smartphone weight-loss app actually helps patients lose weight.

The supplement was published with the support of RWJF. Studies in the issue include:

Special Training for Physicians in Antibiotics Decreases Inappropriate Use and C. difficile Infections

With growing concerns about increasing antibiotic-resistant bacteria, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has been urging hospitals to adopt antibiotic “timeouts.” Nearly 50 percent of antibiotic use is unnecessary or inappropriate, according to the CDC, so what can hospitals and physicians do to ensure that antibiotics continue to be effective? The McGill University Health Centre (MUHC) in Montreal tested a simple approach: provide monthly in-person trainings for physicians and residents in appropriate antibiotic use and implement a weekly review of all patients receiving antibiotics. This approach decreased inappropriate antibiotic use and resulted in a mild decline in Clostridium difficile infections. “Our pilot program led to significant savings in the cost of antibiotics paid out of our hospital budget,” said RWJF Clinical Scholars alumna and Louise Pilote, MD, PhD, MPH, Chief of Internal Medicine at the MUHC and McGill University. “This is good news for anyone concerned about antibiotic effectiveness and reducing health care costs.”

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Nov 14 2014
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Are You Going to the American Public Health Association Meeting Next Week?

During this year’s American Public Health Association (APHA) Annual Meeting & Exposition, 10 Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF) grantees will give short talks at the first-ever RWJF Briefings @ the Booth on Monday, November 17 and Tuesday, November 18. Grantees from a variety of programs, representing numerous health and health care sectors, will share their insights on topics ranging from health literacy to obesity interventions to green building certification.

American Public Health Association Meeting & Expo

The briefings will take place at the RWJF exhibit space in the Ernest N. Morial Convention Center.

Grab a cup of coffee at the RWJF café and join a briefing! The schedule follows.

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Nov 13 2014
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RWJF Scholars in the News: EpiPens in schools, suicide prevention, financial incentives for wellness, and more.

Around the country, print, broadcast and online media outlets are covering the groundbreaking work of Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF) leaders, scholars, fellows, alumni and grantees. Some recent examples:

A study by RWJF Physician Faculty Scholars alumna Ruchi Gupta, MD, MPH, shows that keeping supplies of epinephrine, commonly known as EpiPens, in schools saves lives, Health Day reports. Epinephrine injections are given in response to life-threatening allergic reactions to food or to insect stings. Gupta’s study found that epinephrine was administered to 35 children and three adults in Chicago public schools during the 2012-13 school year. “We were surprised to see that of those who received the epinephrine, more than half of the reactions were first-time incidents,” Gupta said. “Many children are trying foods for the first time at school, and therefore it is critical that schools are prepared for a possible anaphylactic reaction.”  Forty-one states have laws recommending schools stock epinephrine, according to the article.

Matt Wray, PhD, MA, an RWJF Health & Society Scholars program alumnus, writes in Medical Xpress that when it comes to preventing suicides, it’s important to focus some attention on how a person seeks to end his or her life. According to the article, suicide-prevention research has shown that when people who have begun to act on suicidal impulses find that access to their chosen method is blocked, many do not seek out other means. “Most people don’t have a backup plan,” Wray writes. “So when their initial attempt is stalled, the destructive impulse often passes. Moreover, contrary to what many believe, people who attempt suicide more than once are rare. Less than 10 percent of those who survive an attempt ever end up dying by suicide.”

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Nov 12 2014
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Connected Health Approaches to Improve the Health of Veterans

Mitesh S. Patel, MD, MBA, MS, is an assistant professor of medicine and health care management at the Perelman School of Medicine and the Wharton School at the University of Pennsylvania. He is a staff physician and core investigator at the Center for Health Equity Research and Promotion at the Philadelphia Veterans Administration (VA) Medical Center. Patel is an alumnus of the VA/Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF) Clinical Scholars Program at the University of Pennsylvania (2012-2014).

Mitesh Patel

Cardiovascular disease is the number one cause of hospitalizations, morbidity and mortality among the veteran population. Building a Culture of Health could address this issue by focusing on individual health behaviors that contribute to risk factors associated with cardiovascular disease such as physical inactivity, diet, obesity, smoking, hyperlipidemia and hypertension.

The current health system is reactive and visit-based. However, veterans spend most of their lives outside of the doctor’s office. They make everyday choices that affect their health such as how often to exercise, what types of food to eat, and whether or not to take their medications.

Connected health is a model for using technology to coordinate care and monitor outcomes remotely. By leveraging connected health approaches, care providers have the opportunity to improve the health of veterans at broader scale and within the setting in which veterans spend most of their time (outside of the health care system). The Veteran’s Health Administration (VHA) is a leader in launching connected health technologies. VHA efforts began in 2003 and included technologies such as My HealtheVet (serving approximately 2 million veterans) and telemedicine (serving about 600,000 veterans).

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Nov 11 2014
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Let’s Put Veterans in Charge of Their Pain Care

Erin Krebs, MD, MPH, is the women’s health medical director at the Minneapolis VA Health Care System and associate professor of medicine at the University of Minnesota Medical School. She is an alumna of the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF) Physician Faculty Scholars program and the RWJF Clinical Scholars program.

Erin Krebs (Veterans Day)

How can we create a Culture of Health that effectively serves veterans? We can put veterans in charge of their pain care.

Chronic pain is an enormous public health problem and a leading cause of disability in the United States. Although 2000-2010 was the “decade of pain control and research” in the United States, plenty of evidence suggests that our usual approaches to managing chronic pain aren’t working. Veterans and other people with chronic pain see many health care providers, yet often describe feeling unheard, poorly understood, and disempowered by their interactions with the health care system.

Evidence supports the effectiveness of a variety of “low tech-high touch” non-pharmacological approaches to pain management, but these approaches are not well aligned with the structure of the U.S. health care system and are often too difficult for people with pain to access. Studies demonstrate that patients with chronic pain are subjected to too many unnecessary diagnostic tests, too many ineffective procedures, and too many high-risk medications.

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Oct 30 2014
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RWJF Scholars in the News: Scapegoating EHRs, Ebola fears, children fighting cancer, and more.

Around the country, print, broadcast and online media outlets are covering the groundbreaking work of Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF) leaders, scholars, fellows, alumni and grantees. Some recent examples:

In an article published in Healthcare IT News, David Blumenthal, MD, MPP, writes that health care providers may be too quick to blame Electronic Health Records (EHR) for medical errors. Blumenthal notes that EHRs are still imperfect and that improvements will take time, but argues: “There is no going back in the electronic health information revolution. No physician or hospital, however loud their complaints, has ever thrown out their EHR and returned to paper. The dissatisfaction with the technology will recede as EHRs improve, and as a new generation of young clinicians, raised in the electronic world, populates our health care system.”  Blumenthal is president of The Commonwealth Fund, former National Coordinator for Health Information Technology, and an RWJF Investigator Award in Health Policy Research recipient.

In a blog published by the Washington Post’s “Monkey Cage,” Shana Gadarian, PhD, and her co-author write that Ebola anxiety, while potentially misplaced and harmful, is likely to have an impact on whom Americans trust to handle the disease and what kinds of policies they will support to fight it. The authors have studies society’s reactions to small pox and H1N1 flu. “In general we find that anxiety makes people more supportive of government playing an expansive role in protecting them during a health crisis ... we think our study and the current Ebola outbreak both emphasize that people will rally around experts and increase their support for policies that fight the contagion, even if they hurt civil liberties. Let us hope that the U.S. health system is ultimately worthy of the confidence the public has in it.” Gadarian is an RWJF Scholars in Health Policy Research alumna.

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Oct 24 2014
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Working Together to Draw More Nurses to Public Health

Patricia Drehobl, MPH, RN, is associate director for program development at the Centers for Disease Control & Prevention (CDC). She is an alumna of the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF) Executive Nurse Fellows program (2007-2010).

Patricia Drehobl

Human Capital Blog: CDC is engaging in new partnerships with the American Association of Colleges of Nursing (AACN) to promote public health nursing. How did the new collaboration come about?

Pat Drehobl: CDC has funded some national academic associations for many years, including the Association of Schools of Public Health, the Association of Prevention Teaching and Research, and the Association of American Medical Colleges. We recognized the need to include nursing representation because nursing is the largest discipline in the public health workforce. We added AACN as a partner in 2012 when we developed our funding opportunity announcement to work with academic partners.

HCB: Why did CDC decide to reach out to the nursing community in 2012?

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Oct 9 2014
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RWJF Scholars in the News: The nurse faculty shortage, teaching empathy, a link between overtime and diabetes, and more.

Around the country, print, broadcast and online media outlets are covering the groundbreaking work of Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF) leaders, scholars, fellows, alumni and grantees. Some recent examples:

ABC News explores the nation’s nursing workforce shortage, focusing specifically on the faculty shortage at nursing schools. “Suddenly, we turned around and realized we’re not attracting enough nurses to go into teaching,” said Kimberly Glassman, PhD, RN, chief nursing officer at NYU Langone Medical Center. “The fear is we will have to shrink the number of nurses we can prepare for the future at a time when we need to prepare more.” Glassman is an RWJF Executive Nurse Fellow. The article was republished by Yahoo News and ABC News Radio.

RWJF Health & Society Scholars program alumnus Allison Aiello, PhD, MS, is interviewed for an NBC News story on Enterovirus D-68. She recommends that parents consider getting flu shots for their children, noting that preventing children from getting the flu should help make Enterovirus less complicated to diagnose and treat. The video is available here.

RWJF Harold Amos Medical Faculty Development Program scholar Paloma Toledo, MD, co-authors a Huffington Post blog entry on the need for medical schools to teach students to be empathetic. Over the course of their training, they become less empathetic, as opposed to more empathetic, and the reasons for this are unclear,” Toledo writes, recommending lectures on active listening and communication skills, among other measures. 

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